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Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. There are many causes for shaking/panting. The shaking and panting are both signs of stress, and your dog may be dealing with anxiety, or stress, related to an event that happened, or is happening. I realize you cannot answer questions on this, however, I will ask some questions that you can ask yourself. Have you recently moved? Have you ever hit or yelled at your dog? Has the weather been bad lately (storms)? Have you had any new guests stay over recently? Have you had any dogs come to your home recently? Have you had any dogs or cats in your yard recently? Was your dog frightened by something initially (a falling pot/pan; a loud bang from the washing machine; a gunshot; a backfiring car/truck; someone screaming in your home/a fight)?

If you answered yes to any of those questions, it could definitely be that. Dogs don’t typically hang on to something for very long, but if it really frightened your pup, then she/he could be feeling serious anxiety related to that specific event, and relating other events to that one.

Do not yell, or hit your dog. I’m not assuming you do, but if you do, please stop doing that right away. It could be that your dog is afraid of you specifically, and you notice the shaking/panting when you are near, because that is the only time your dog is doing it.

If you’d like to purchase a consultation with me (I know, it’s a lot to ask, but I really feel like I could help) I’d be more than happy to ask you many questions, and together we can figure out what the heck is going on here. It’s important that your dog is comfortable, and if your pup is always feeling anxious/uneasy, then his/her quality of life is in jeopardy.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Your dog shaking and panting could point to something in their body that shouldn`t be there. It could be a virus, bacteria, insect or animal venom, or something toxic. You need to act quickly. Check your dog for fever and look for evidence of stings or bites.
Fear, Anxiety, or Stress

Loud noises such as fireworks or thunderstorms are common causes of fear, anxiety, and stress (FAS) in a dog. According to the Pet Health Network, your dog`s excessive panting due to anxiety may be accompanied by other symptoms such as: Trembling. Whining.

Shivering and trembling may be symptoms of something serious — like poisoning, kidney disease, or injury. So, if your dog suddenly starts trembling or shivering, it`s important to take note of other symptoms such as diarrhea, vomiting, or limping. Then talk to your vet right away.
Why is my dog panting? Dogs pant to regulate their temperature. Unlike humans, dogs aren`t able to regulate their temperature using sweat so instead, they pant to circulate cool air through their bodies and to evaporate water from the mouth and upper respiratory tract.
If your dog is lethargic and shaking, it is most commonly a sign of pain. You may not know where the pain is, but it`s a sign that your dog is in distress and is not feeling well. Sometimes the dog isn`t sure what is going on either and is trying to move as little as possible so they don`t hurt as much.
Excessive amounts of cortisol can cause muscle weakness, panting, increased urination and drinking, thinning of skin, loss of hair, and increased susceptibility to infections and to diabetes mellitus. Too little cortisol causes weakness, low blood sugar, loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, and shaking.
If your Chihuahua shakes and shivers in the morning, evening or when they go outside, then it`s likely a result of them being cold. You can stop this behavior by warming them up and offering some thermal protection against the biting cold temperatures.
Although Chihuahuas are the tiniest breed of dogs, they produce a lot of energy because of their fast metabolism. These dogs burn three times as many calories as other canines. This can cause shivering or shaking as a `side effect.
Many dogs with CHF will tire out more easily, have reduced stamina, and do not engage in playing or walking as they once did. Coughing when at rest or sleeping, excessive panting, persistent loss of appetite, a swollen belly, and pale or bluish gums are also signs associated with heart failure.
Wincing, Whining or Crying

All three of these actions indicate an injury or some kind of pain your dog is experiencing. If you start to pet your dog and they shy away from your hand or whine, you know there is something wrong.

Offer your dog water, as panting can lead to dehydration. Dogs should always have access to clean, fresh water, but it`s especially important to offer water when they`re panting heavily.
Dogs pant for many reasons, and often it`s normal. However, if they`re panting excessively, it could be due to anxiety, pain, heatstroke, or an underlying health condition. Therefore, it`s best to get them checked over by a veterinarian.
What are the typical signs of pain in dogs? General behaviour: Shaking, flattened ears, low posture, aggression, grumpy temperament, panting or crying, excessive licking or scratching a specific area, reluctant to play, interact or exercise, lameness (limping), stiffness after rest, loss of appetite.
Some of the signs of parvovirus include lethargy; loss of appetite; abdominal pain and bloating; fever or low body temperature (hypothermia); vomiting; and severe, often bloody, diarrhea. Persistent vomiting and diarrhea can cause rapid dehydration, and damage to the intestines and immune system can cause septic shock.
As the disease progresses, dogs lose muscle and become weak. Owners might notice a thinning of the skin, lesions on the skin, and hair loss on the flanks, neck, and perineum. Obesity and lack of energy are also symptoms.
Dogs can experience panic attacks like the way humans do,” she explains. “This means they may experience a sudden feeling of intense fear and anxiety that could cause physical responses.”
Sometimes dogs are frightened of new situations and stimuli, like a visit to the groomer or vet. Others may have more ingrained phobias, like loud cars or slick flooring. Separation Anxiety: Affecting around 14% of dogs, this anxiety occurs when your pet is left alone.
Tremors, syncope, narcolepsy, vertigo, and painful muscle spasms can mimic seizures.
It`s all right to touch or comfort your dog, but avoid putting your hands near his mouth — his jaws may convulse during a seizure and he might inadvertently bite your hand. All dogs who suffer from seizures should see a vet.
If your dog sometimes shakes with excitement then there`s nothing to worry about and the shaking should stop once they are calm again. Keeping things a little more relaxed when they are this excited will help them to quiet down and should help to ease their shaking.
The Chihuahua is a generally healthy breed with an average lifespan of 12-14 years. They are known to suffer from some common conditions like luxating patella and cataracts.
The Chihuahua does require regular bathing and brushing. This self-confident little dog can be bathed as frequently as every week up to no longer than 6 weeks, depending on lifestyle and activity level. Somewhere in between is a happy medium.
Dilated cardiomyopathy may have a sudden onset of clinical signs; however, the disease has actually been developing slowly and subtly. Some dogs may develop severe congestive heart failure (CHF) in only a few hours. Rapid, heavy breathing, a blue tongue, excessive drooling, or collapse may be the first signs.
How Long Can Dogs Live with Congestive Heart Failure? In general, dogs that are diagnosed with congestive heart failure can live anywhere from 6 months to 1 1/2 to 2 years.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My 4 year old Chihuahua mix began having a series shaking/panting episodes (last 15m- 1hr) out of the blue. Vet’s tests say its not physical.
ANSWER : A. There are many causes for shaking/panting. The shaking and panting are both signs of stress, and your dog may be dealing with anxiety, or stress, related to an event that happened, or is happening. I realize you cannot answer questions on this, however, I will ask some questions that you can ask yourself. Have you recently moved? Have you ever hit or yelled at your dog? Has the weather been bad lately (storms)? Have you had any new guests stay over recently? Have you had any dogs come to your home recently? Have you had any dogs or cats in your yard recently? Was your dog frightened by something initially (a falling pot/pan; a loud bang from the washing machine; a gunshot; a backfiring car/truck; someone screaming in your home/a fight)?

If you answered yes to any of those questions, it could definitely be that. Dogs don’t typically hang on to something for very long, but if it really frightened your pup, then she/he could be feeling serious anxiety related to that specific event, and relating other events to that one.

Do not yell, or hit your dog. I’m not assuming you do, but if you do, please stop doing that right away. It could be that your dog is afraid of you specifically, and you notice the shaking/panting when you are near, because that is the only time your dog is doing it.

If you’d like to purchase a consultation with me (I know, it’s a lot to ask, but I really feel like I could help) I’d be more than happy to ask you many questions, and together we can figure out what the heck is going on here. It’s important that your dog is comfortable, and if your pup is always feeling anxious/uneasy, then his/her quality of life is in jeopardy.

Q. Vet is saying our dog has heartworm based on a sonogram. All tests are negative and he has no cough. I am very confused
ANSWER : A. Very rarely, a dog can have a heartworm infection and still test negative on an antigen test since the antigen tested for is produced only by the female worms. If the heartworms were not fully mature, or there were only male worms present, the antigen test result in infected animals would be falsely negative. This means the test result is negative when the animal is really infected.

An antibody test will be positive even if only one male worm is present. But this test has a downfall, too. Although it is very good at giving positive results when an infection is present, a positive antibody test just means the animal has been exposed to heartworms, but may or may not currently have heartworm disease. A negative antibody test means the animal has never been exposed to heartworms.

If they are actually seeing the heartworms via ultrasound, I would follow precautions by restricting exercise. This requirement might be difficult to adhere to, especially if your dog is accustomed to being active. But your dog’s normal physical activities must be restricted as soon as the diagnosis is confirmed, because physical exertion increases the rate at which the heartworms cause damage in the heart and lungs. The more severe the symptoms, the less activity your dog should have. And the diagnosis should be confirmed. Once a dog tests positive on an antigen test, the diagnosis should be confirmed with an additional—and different—test. Because the treatment regimen for heartworm is both expensive and complex, your veterinarian will want to be absolutely sure that treatment is necessary.

Q. My dog has been tested for Cushing’s. Her test came back affirming possible Cushing’s but she doesn’t have symptoms, only panting. What if untreated?
ANSWER : A. Cushing’s Disease can result in a wide range of symptoms from panting, changes in thirst and urination, hair loss along the flanks, and even skin and body changes. If it hasn’t been done already, there are more specific blood tests that can be done to confirm a Cushing’s diagnosis if your dog’s previous bloodwork was on the fence regarding it. Urine cortisol tests, Dex-suppression tests and ACTH stimulation tests are all specific tests that can confirm a Cushing’s diagnosis.

There are also two forms of Cushing’s, one based on a pituitary problem and one caused by prolonged use of corticosteroids. If your dog has been on a long-term steroid medication, your vet may wish to discontinue or test again after a period to confirm the diagnosis.

Not treating Cushing’s can result in permanent changes to the skin and coat, and may also cause problems with the bladder and kidneys. As it is a metabolic disease, leaving it untreated may also cause other metabolic issues further in the future. Treatment is usually just a daily medication to bring the hormones in the body back to normal.

Q. We think our dog had a stroke:( he is 14 years old, a cocker spaniel mix. Do we need to take him to an emergency vet or should he be fine until mornin
ANSWER : A. If it was a stroke (vestibular syndrome) there is little the vet will do for the first 24-48 hours apart from giving an anti vomiting injection. You need to wait and see how well the dog responds after the episode to see if he fully recovers, sometimes they partially recover but may end up with a head tilt.
If it was a seizure they normally only last seconds and then within an hour the dog is back to normal. Again you don`t need to consult your vet straight away but monitor him. Some dogs may have one seizure but never again. If this is what it was then see your vet if your dog has another one.

Q. I have a 13 1/2 year old Shih Tzu. How old is he in dog years?
ANSWER : A. It’s used to be that dog years were 7 years to every 1. Now it normally around 5 years to every year as long as your dog is healthy and kept up with vaccines. So he’s about 68ish in dog years.

Read Full Q/A … : Shih Tzu Age

Q. My dog has Addison’s Disease and is panting alot, is this normal?
ANSWER : A. I don’t typically associate panting with Addison’s disease. I do see panting (it’s a primary symptom) of the disease that’s the opposite of Addison’s disease, which is Cushing’s disease. Cushing’s disease involves having an overactive adrenal gland, as opposed to a non-active or under active adrenal gland. Panting can also happen with steroid administration. If you’ve upped the dose of prednisone that your dog normally takes to combat holiday stress that may be the cause of the panting.

Panting can be a sign of stress, so evaluate the environment and see if there’s something that could have your dog agitated – fireworks, small children visiting, etc. This is especially important with an addisonian dog, as I’m sure you know.

Other causes of panting could include primary respiratory problems or heart disease, since low oxygen states can trigger panting. Definitely mention this to your vet (a phone call isn’t a bad idea) for this reason, just to see if he’ like to examine your dog to make sure everything’s OK>

Q. We have been treating our 5 year old cat for black bumps that we treated with Special Diet. These bumps grow over his body
ANSWER : A. If your cat has black bumps or other skin lesions forming that have not cleared up with preventive flea treatment or changes in diet, it may be time to request some additional testing as needed. Your vet can take a skin scraping of one of the lesions and send it to a Lab for various tests. One test includes growing any bacteria or fungus present, and then subjecting them to various medications to find which one is best to use. Other tests just look for certain growth patterns to determine if a fungus or bacteria is present which can be treated with oral or topical medications from your vet.

Cats can commonly have chin acne, which is the formation of little bumps that can be red or black in color and may sometimes break open and ooze debris. The cause of this acne is unknown, however one theory is that cats can actually get bacterial infections from rubbing their chins on plastic food dishes or dishes that are not cleaned often. Treatment may involve anywhere from none at all in minor cases, to use of wipes, creams or antibiotics for helping clear up any infection.

Q. My cocker spaniel is 9 years old. He has involuntary bowel movements (little drops) very frequently, especially when he is asleep.
ANSWER : A. Is your dog on a senior dog food? I would get your dog on a high quality high protien dog food. Ask a pet store assosicate or your regular vet for a food recommendation. When you buy a better food the dog will have to eat less to get the same amount of energy from the food. The dog has to eat more of the cheaper foods to get the energy it needs from it. Meaning more poop and buying more food. So the cost really evens out. So the lessen your dogs bowel movements get on a better senior dog food. Next talk to your vet they may have a recommendation. If you switch dogs do it slowly by mixing the foods. Start with 10% new 90% old mixed for at least a week until you have switched to 100% new 0% old. Senior foods have more fiber to help with bowel movements. Take the dog outside to go potty more frequently, right before bed time.

Read Full Q/A … : Symptoms Questions & Answers