Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. She should be examined by your vet or emergency vet if she is uncomfortable to find the cause of the pain and to treat appropriately.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Pain is the most likely cause of yelping in dogs, especially if the yelp is a sudden one. If your dog yelps suddenly and follows this with a whine, check them thoroughly for any sign that they may have been injured.
Also, if you pick your dog up and they yelp in pain, this could be a sign of IVDD because a lot of pressure is put on the spine. When you go to transport a dachshund to the vet, handle their body very carefully and make sure to support both sides with two arms. You do not want to leave their back dangling.
Excitement, anxiety, frustration, pain, attention seeking, and resource solicitation are all common reasons dogs whine at their people. Most commonly, these sounds are aimed at conveying the desire for food, water, a potty break, a toy, attention, etc.
Pain: If your dog is in pain, it may remain hidden or become reluctant to interact with the family. Your dog may seem to be panting more than usual or trembling. You may also notice other signs of pain like irritability, restlessness, or aggression.
There are several possible reasons why your dog yelps when touched or cry out after being touched. It`s possible that your dog is suffering from some form of physical pain or stress. Meanwhile, it`s also likely that your dog is too excited or is seeking attention.
If your dog previously enjoyed being petted or touched and now suddenly does not, you should seek veterinary consultation. A health issue causing pain (i.e. illness or injury) can cause a sudden onset of touch sensitivity. Fearful or painful experiences can also cause a dog to develop touch sensitivity.
On this note, research shows that dogs can sense depression, and many of them even respond lovingly to their humans in an attempt to cheer them up. In the same way that we pay attention to their behavior, dogs also pay attention to our actions to determine our “energy” that day.
What are the typical signs of pain in dogs? General behaviour: Shaking, flattened ears, low posture, aggression, grumpy temperament, panting or crying, excessive licking or scratching a specific area, reluctant to play, interact or exercise, lameness (limping), stiffness after rest, loss of appetite.
Signs a Dog May Be Feeling `Sad`

A depressed dog may stop eating and drinking, become lethargic and withdrawn, or their depression can manifest as anxiety, and the dog may become destructive. A depressed dog might also become aggressive, Inman says.

Some things that can cause your dog to be yelping and shaking include: Pain. Anxiety.
NSAID options that are approved for use in dogs include carprofen (e.g. Rimadyl), deracoxib (e.g. Deramaxx), etodolac (e.g. Etogesic), firocoxib (e.g. Previcox), meloxicam (e.g. Metacam), robenacoxib (e.g. Onsior), and mavacoxib (e.g. Trocoxil).
If your dog has started whimpering or yelping when picked up, your dog may be in pain or experiencing mental anguish. If you suspect that your dog is in pain or suffering from a serious illness, keep an eye on their other behavior. They may have started limping or refusing to eat.
Areas to Avoid

The genitals and anus are obvious areas to stay away from; dogs are protective of these areas just like humans. In general, other areas to avoid petting include the face, tail, feet, and legs. Hugging a dog should also be avoided unless you are certain the dog likes it.

The negative message could be a result of harsh handling and punishment, pain from a prior injury, or simply a lack of adequate handling and socialization when he was a pup. This is very different from operant conditioning, where the dog acts on the environment.
General weakness can be a sign of pinched spinal nerves, compression of the spinal cord or of a more serious medical condition. Some dogs will seem generally uncomfortable and will constantly fidget when at rest — this will generally manifest as an inability to lie down or continually adjusting position.
Many dog parents find themselves asking the question, “Can arthritis in dogs come on suddenly?” The symptoms of arthritis in dogs often start slowly and get worse over time. Dog parents may miss the early stages of the disease when their four-legged friends are experiencing only a small amount of discomfort.
Dogs usually get arthritis from the age of 8 years onwards. These are seniors and arthritis around this age is not uncommon. However, some dogs can experience arthritis from an incredibly young age. With some dogs showing signs of arthritis from as young as one year old.
A hurt dog may express their pain either through whining, whimpering, yelping, growling, and even howling.
Dogs with a pulled muscle will have symptoms similar to those observed with a torn muscle; however, the symptoms will be milder. Things to look for when a muscle is pulled are muscle spasms, weakness, cramping, and immobility, as well as pain, bruising, and swelling.
A depressed dog shows similar body language to an anxious dog. He may avoid eye contact and seek to be alone. His eyes will be dull and sad, with the inner eyebrows raised. His body and tail will be low, and he may lose interest in food and in things that he previously enjoyed, such as interaction and play.
Separation anxiety is triggered when dogs become upset because of separation from their guardians, the people they`re attached to. Escape attempts by dogs with separation anxiety are often extreme and can result in self-injury and household destruction, especially around exit points like windows and doors.
In some cases with mild back pain, painkillers and other medications given to help a dog rest may be all that`s needed to resolve a back issue, Tracy says. The key is to only expect painkillers to cure mild pain. Severe pain may require laser procedures or surgery, he says.
Causes of back pain in dogs

Injuries – examples include spinal trauma and minor injuries caused by a bad landing or wrong movement. They cause damage to the spine, thus inducing back pain. Intervertebral Disc Disease (IVDD) – this is the most common cause of back pain in dogs.

When you kiss your dog, you may notice signs that indicate they know that the kiss is a gesture of affection. As puppies, this is not something that dogs would recognize, although they would feel you doing it. However, as they get older they associate the kisses and cuddles with you being happy with them.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My 5 y.o. Dachshund has started yelping (sometimes) when I touch her and sometimes when no one is. I can’t find the source of her pain.
ANSWER : A. She should be examined by your vet or emergency vet if she is uncomfortable to find the cause of the pain and to treat appropriately.

Q. Shiba Inu. He periodically shakes and trembles, usually unrpovoked and seeming for no reason. Usually cuddling helps but not always. Becomes reclusive
ANSWER : A. I do find that Shiba Inu’s are a really sensitive breed. I think the first thing to rule out is pain. That could be pain from a muscle injury or even gastrointestinal pain. Try to pinpoint whether it occurs after a meal or not. He might be painful due to something going on in his GI tract, and the pain is at its worse after he eats.

I’ve also seen a lot of small breeds like Shibas get back pain, and shaking can definitely accompany that as well. If you haven’t see your vet who can perform a good physical exam and look for any signs of muscular pain along the spine or elsewhere. It’s not a bad idea at this point to consider doing some blood work just to screen for any problems that could be affecting organ function, for example.

If he’s healthy otherwise, I think it’s likely that there’s something that’s scaring him at home. These things can be really difficult to identify, and you have to be really aware and note exactly when the shaking occurs, how long it lasts, etc, and look for patterns. Dogs can hear things we can’t, and he may be hearing things you’re missing, and the noise is disturbing to him. Cuddling is a good idea, also working to distract him and desensitize him with toys and treats might help. But like I said above – definitely rule out pain first.

Q. She itching and loosing her fur but finding no fleas at all on her
ANSWER : A. Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. My 13 yr old male indoor cat displays tenderness to touch in his sides/haunches and it is increasing. Recently put him on diet for arthritis.
ANSWER : A. While tenderness in the back and hips can indicate arthritis pain, it can also sometimes indicate pain internally such as stomach or other organ issues. Cats and other pets will often stiffen their backs to protect the abdomen when in pain. If the pain continues or your cat is still in pain with arthritis treatment it is best to schedule a checkup with your vet to make sure there is not another source for the issue.

Read Full Q/A … : Vetinfo

Q. My cat is excessively scrstching herself., to the point she has sores. She is strictly an indoor cat. Did have flees been treated for 2 months
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. My dog experiences extreme pain when jumping up on the bed or into the car.Sometimes when he launches into a run or gets excited he will yelp. Pano?
ANSWER : A. I’d agree that panosteitis is unlikely in a 2 year old dog, however it is possible. Luckily it’s pretty easy to diagnose. The pain is extremely obvious when the long bones are palpated from middle to almost end. Classically, the dog will be standing as you press along the bone, and then you’ll get to the spot with the lesion, and the dog will yelp in pain, or try to bite you. So I think if your dog had pano, you’d know it, and your vet would have figured it out.

If your dog has been through rigorous diagnostics like x-rays and blood work and no cause has been found, I think (unfortunately) it’s time to see a specialist. I’m really suspicious of a spinal problem, as they can be really difficult to find with routine examination and x-rays. A veterinary neurologist can perform a full neuro exam to look for deficits, and then if findings point to a possible spinal issue suggest imaging, possibly an MRI. In a dog as young as yours if nothing obvious has been found I suspect it’s in the spinal area. GSDs are predisposed to lumbosacral stenosis, so that’s where I’d start looking. Good luck.

Read Full Q/A … : Leerburg

Q. My frenchie puppy has a rash in her ears and one of her eyes is red
ANSWER : A. Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. Found a Cat in severe pain. Hasn’t moved at all and I do not see blood. How can I find the source of the pain. Got food and water, moved head and neck
ANSWER : A. This is really a situation in which you should seek the help of a veterinarian. There are too many possibilities of what could be wrong to even guess at what is “hurting”. This cat should have a proper exam and may need additional tests (radiographs, bloodwork). Let a veterinarian find the source of the pain……plus, if you found this cat and you have no history on it…..you don’t know if it has been vaccinated. There is always a concern for getting bit, especially if an animal is painful. Without knowledge of a Rabies vaccine, you are taking a big risk.