r pain?

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. If your dog has a broken leg, then veterinary care is a must. If you can get into contact with your local vet before seeing him or her, they may be able to give you information on an OTC pain medication that could be safe to give dogs. Do not attempt to give any medications without first consulting your vet as many pain meds can cause kidney/liver failure or stomach ulceration if given to dogs. In the meantime, keep your dog on strict kennel or bed rest and only taking him out for short potty breaks is best to keep pain down and from letting the leg get further injured.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

While a broken bone does naturally heal on its own (through bone remodeling), that does not mean it will heal properly. Bone can set improperly so allowing a bone to heal on its own can cause permanent deformities. Moreover, once bone has fused it cannot be reset.
Keep your pet as still and quiet as possible. If small enough, place your pet in a crate or box. Do not give any pain relievers or any other type of medication unless directed by a vet. Fractures cannot be treated at home.
According to VCA Hospitals, other signs that your dog`s leg might be broken include intense pain, swelling at the site of the fracture, and the leg lying at an awkward angle. If your dog is willing to walk, he won`t put any weight on a leg that`s broken, but will instead carry it above the ground.
Once your veterinarian sets the bone fragments back into their proper place, (if necessary), your dog will probably wear a splint or cats for several weeks to help the set bones knit properly, along with a neck collar to keep it from chewing or licking this device. A complex leg fracture may require surgical repair.
The first sign of a broken bone in a dog is substantial swelling and redness. The first few days of inflammation might extend anywhere from a few days to a week. If you haven`t had your dog to the vet or animal hospital, due so immediately. By not dealing with a break immediately will lead to far more expensive issues.
Dog`s broken leg can heal on its own. But it can heal in the wrong position and cause more problems later on. If you suspect your dog has a broken leg you should seek veterinarian help right away. While you are waiting for a veterinarian appointment, you should restrain your dog from any activity.
A veterinary surgeon will place pins or plates with screws to stabilize the bone until it heals. A splint or cast may be needed after the surgery to provide additional stability. Some fractures require external fixation.
Walk slowly with your recovering dog.

Early in recovery, do make sure that your dog walks really slowly. This will speed up recovery by allowing them to place each leg safely. This is the case whether your dog is recovering from an injury, or has had an operation on a leg or on the spine.

This is another question to ask yourself before knowing when to let your dog go. Most often, weakness and inability to move freely are clear signs that the animal needs urgent medical help or has declined to the point that it`s time to consider euthanasia or putting your dog to sleep.
The trickiest part of healing will be to ensure your dog doesn`t jump or run or get too playful while the broken bones are healing. Your vet may prescribe some physical therapy and rehabilitation to strengthen the muscles and tendons, which may also include exercises for you to do with your dog at home.
Generally, the cost of a dog`s broken bone runs from $200 to $1,000 and up. Some minor fractures don`t require any treatment besides rest; others, like compound fractures, may involve surgery and steel plates inserted into the animal`s limb.
As a breed, Dachshunds are extremely prone to injuring their backs. In fact, experts estimate that one in four Dachshunds will develop some form of disc disease or injury in its lifetime.
A Broken Bone from Your Dog`s Point of View

If your dog has a mild break, they may experience mild to moderate swelling, discomfort, and pain. Severe breaks can cause more trauma to the surrounding tissue, so there is often significant pain and swelling.

Dogs are no different than humans in that they can accidentally fracture a leg bone during times of exercise or play. Not all events lead to broken bones; legs can also be dislocated or may have smaller fractures known as hairline fractures (small crack in the bone).
Dog Broken Leg Home Treatment

If it`s a closed fracture and no bone is visible from the outside, you can use splints to stabilize the limb into place. This can be anything from a household spoon to a sturdy piece of cardboard. Doing this will help prevent further damage to the nerves, muscles, or surrounding tissue.

NSAID options that are approved for use in dogs include carprofen (e.g. Rimadyl), deracoxib (e.g. Deramaxx), etodolac (e.g. Etogesic), firocoxib (e.g. Previcox), meloxicam (e.g. Metacam), robenacoxib (e.g. Onsior), and mavacoxib (e.g. Trocoxil).
Due to the amount of time, equipment and aftercare required, a typical surgical repair for a leg fracture can cost upwards of $2,000. This price can be considerably higher depending on the age of the dog and any other medical conditions they may have. Worried about the cost of Surgical Fracture Repair treatment?
Look at the site of the limp for signs of bleeding, to help determine if the condition is from a bite, injury, or puncture. Often if the limping isn`t serious you can watch your dog at home for between 24 & 48 hours to see if more symptoms occur or if the limp gets worse.
The most prominent sign that you will notice is a complete relaxation of the body, your dog will no longer appear tense, rather they will “let go.” You will notice a slimming of the body as the air is expelled from their lungs for the last time and you may notice the lack of life in their eyes if they are still open.
For severely injured dogs that are unable to stand on their own, a pet stretcher is often the safest way to transport your large dog. A transport stretcher safely supports your dog`s entire weight and allows multiple people to help carry your dog to the car or to Vet.
Dogs are able to identify, with ease, the scent of someone they recognize over the someone they have yet to meet. Even before an individual walks through the door, dogs have been alerted to who it is using their senses of smell and hearing.
E – Exclamation of pain: If your dog is suddenly whining or crying when he moves, he`s letting you — and the world — know that he`s in pain. He may also cry out when you`re petting him. Alternately, he may bark less, just because barking is too much trouble.
Repairing broken bones

Fractures below the knee or elbow are immobilised with splints and casts. Fractures involving joints usually require open surgery and repair with pins, screws, and wire. Your vet may even choose to refer your dog to an orthopaedic specialist.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My 5 year old Dachshund has broken his rear leg. A trip to the vet is impossible for two more days (rural area), can I give him something for pain?
ANSWER : A. If your dog has a broken leg, then veterinary care is a must. If you can get into contact with your local vet before seeing him or her, they may be able to give you information on an OTC pain medication that could be safe to give dogs. Do not attempt to give any medications without first consulting your vet as many pain meds can cause kidney/liver failure or stomach ulceration if given to dogs. In the meantime, keep your dog on strict kennel or bed rest and only taking him out for short potty breaks is best to keep pain down and from letting the leg get further injured.

Q. How do I FINALLY rid all 4 of my cats of tapeworms after 2 years of dealing with it? Fleas seem to be controlled. I know they are the vector.
ANSWER : A. If your cats keep getting tapeworms, then they are picking up fleas from somewhere. Fleas will hitch a ride on your pant leg from outside.

Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

You can also use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the life cycle.

Q. My cat is excessively scrstching herself., to the point she has sores. She is strictly an indoor cat. Did have flees been treated for 2 months
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. German short hair 37 lbs was running full speed and hit her leg on a big rock. She’s limping and in pain. Far from vet. Can I give her aspirin?
ANSWER : A. Aspirin should not be given unless instructed to do so by your vet. This medication can cause stomach ulceration or organ problems if not given in the correct dosage. If you have a vet you regularly see but cannot get to you may be able to contact them for the correct medication dosage to give for the short-term. You should also try to keep your dog calm and quiet and restrict activity until she can be seen by a vet to help prevent further injury to the leg and facilitate healing. Once you can get to your vet, your vet can examine the leg and provide treatment including a dog-safe pain medication.

Read Full Q/A … : Vetinfo

Q. Need help, we have done flea bath ,sprayed the house and used charts ultra guard pro and still have fleas .how can we get rid of them
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Q. What can I do about a broken toenail that has bent between the foot pad?
ANSWER : A. Broken toenails can be very painful in dogs if the “quick”, or nailbed is exposed. Typically they’re too painful to deal with at home if this is the case. If the nailbed isn’t involved and the area isn’t painful, take your dog’s nail clippers and trim away the excess part that has broken.

If the nailbed is exposed you’ll have to see your vet to deal with this. Usually we have to put local anesthetic in the area to numb the toe, then pull off the broken part of the nail. They usually need a bandage as well to protect the area from dirt, since the open nailbed is prone to infection, and is painful to walk on.

Q. Shiba Inu. He periodically shakes and trembles, usually unrpovoked and seeming for no reason. Usually cuddling helps but not always. Becomes reclusive
ANSWER : A. I do find that Shiba Inu’s are a really sensitive breed. I think the first thing to rule out is pain. That could be pain from a muscle injury or even gastrointestinal pain. Try to pinpoint whether it occurs after a meal or not. He might be painful due to something going on in his GI tract, and the pain is at its worse after he eats.

I’ve also seen a lot of small breeds like Shibas get back pain, and shaking can definitely accompany that as well. If you haven’t see your vet who can perform a good physical exam and look for any signs of muscular pain along the spine or elsewhere. It’s not a bad idea at this point to consider doing some blood work just to screen for any problems that could be affecting organ function, for example.

If he’s healthy otherwise, I think it’s likely that there’s something that’s scaring him at home. These things can be really difficult to identify, and you have to be really aware and note exactly when the shaking occurs, how long it lasts, etc, and look for patterns. Dogs can hear things we can’t, and he may be hearing things you’re missing, and the noise is disturbing to him. Cuddling is a good idea, also working to distract him and desensitize him with toys and treats might help. But like I said above – definitely rule out pain first.

Q. My 13 year old male cat is acting lethargic & doesn’t seem to be feeling well. I don’t know what’s wrong except that he has fleas. Can too many fleas
ANSWER : A. Excessive fleas can cause anemia in cats, left untreated, this can be life-threatening. I recommend getting your cat seen by your vet right away for his illness. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard, since fleas will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.