Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. it could be a number of things such as diabetes, liver or kidney disease, or Cushing. It is best to have him examined by the vet, who may do lab work and other diagnostics to determine the problem and devise an appropriate treatment plan.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

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Excessive thirst could indicate an underlying issue such as kidney disease, liver disease or a cystitis. Sometimes, dogs will drink so much that they bring it right back up. It is also possible that the vomiting is not caused by the excessive thirst and is due to e.g. a gastroenteritis or infection.
Many conditions can lead to excessive thirst or dehydration in your dog, including diabetes, Cushing`s disease, cancer, diarrhea, fever, infection, kidney disease, and liver disease. Sometimes, however, it may not be the condition itself causing your dog`s excessive thirst, but the medication used to treat it.
If your dog is throwing up, but still acting otherwise normal, it`s possible that your pet has either chronic gastritis (inflammation of the stomach) or food indiscretion. Food indiscretion in dogs is very common when they get so excited about eating that they eat too fast or too much, and some of it comes back out.
Many cases of dog vomiting result from gastric irritation due to eating inedible objects, spoiled or rich food (raiding the garbage, table scraps), or simply eating too much too fast. Dogs and puppies may also vomit due to motion sickness during car rides or from poisoning or swallowing dangerous objects.
If your dog has been vomiting frequently or it has become a long-term or chronic issue, this is cause for concern, especially if you`ve noticed symptoms including abdominal pain, depression, dehydration, blood, poor appetite, fever, weakness, weight loss or other unusual behaviors.
Sudden behavior changes in your dog can be concerning, whether it`s an aversion or fear of something they used to enjoy — think rough-housing with other dogs or daily trips to the local dog park — or a new habit that`s appeared out of the blue, like barking out the window or guarding their toys.
There are many different reasons why your dog may be vomiting. This can be caused by intolerance to new food or by ingesting something they shouldn`t have. Keep in mind that the reason your dog is sick can also be more serious: heatstroke or kidney failure are possible causes too.
Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Some beagles develop irritable bowel syndrome. You might notice that your dog has symptoms such as gas and chronic diarrhea. If so, your vet can prescribe special food to minimize symptoms. Stress can make the condition worse, so keeping your dog relaxed will help them feel better.
Beagles are susceptible to bacterial and viral infections — the same ones that all dogs can get — such as parvo, rabies, and distemper. Many of these infections are preventable through vaccination, which we will recommend based on the diseases we see in our area, her age, and other factors.
Acute pancreatitis can occur after a dog eats a fatty food such as pork, beef, and some other human foods. Dogs that get into garbage can develop pancreatitis. Pancreatitis can also have other causes, including certain medications and some viral or bacterial infections.
One of the most common foods involved in the cause of pancreatitis is pork or pork products. Many dogs can tolerate and have digested ham, sausage, and pepperoni, but many others have died from the complications of pancreatitis after doing so. The fat in pork products seems to be very taxing on a dog`s G.I.
Vomit may be clear or a yellow or brown color, and diarrhea will often contain blood and be a light yellow or mustard colored hue. In addition to vomiting frequently, your puppy may also appear to be drooling or foaming at the mouth as part of their parvo symptoms. Your puppy`s nose may also begin running.
Some of the signs of parvovirus include lethargy; loss of appetite; abdominal pain and bloating; fever or low body temperature (hypothermia); vomiting; and severe, often bloody, diarrhea. Persistent vomiting and diarrhea can cause rapid dehydration, and damage to the intestines and immune system can cause septic shock.
Cushing`s disease (hyperadrenocorticism) is a serious health condition in dogs that occurs when the adrenal glands overproduce cortisol (cortisone) in the animal`s body. Excess cortisol can put a dog at risk of several serious conditions and illnesses, from kidney damage to diabetes, and can be life-threatening.
For example, in case of Beagles, they have a genetic predisposition and a condition called idiopathic renal failure is likely to happen because of which the kidney function progressively reduces. According to research, 50% of Beagles would die of idiopathic renal failure,” says Dr Narendra Gandhi.
Some dogs become more defiant, lethargic, aggressive, and fussy about food, potty habits, and weather or are prone to injury. On the same note, a smaller dog may reach their peak at 5-7 years. You may need another tip in training because of a possible peak energy span.
What are the typical signs of pain in dogs? General behaviour: Shaking, flattened ears, low posture, aggression, grumpy temperament, panting or crying, excessive licking or scratching a specific area, reluctant to play, interact or exercise, lameness (limping), stiffness after rest, loss of appetite.
The most common “developed abnormal behaviors” are aggression, fear reactions, inappropriate elimination, vocalization, altered facial expression, altered posture, restlessness, and hiding [4]. Pain has also been related to repetitive behaviors [5].
Dogs sometimes vomit up yellow foam. This yellow foam is a form of bile, or digestive fluid, that is produced in the liver, stored in the gallbladder, and released into the small intestine, just below the stomach. This yellow foam usually means that its stomach is empty and the bile is causing stomach irritation.
Bismuth subsalicylate (Pepto-Bismol®) is commonly kept in medicine cabinets for digestive upsets and can be administered to your dog.
The most common reason for a dog to throw up white foam is GI distress. Foamy vomit may occur if a pooch has excess gas in his stomach. If your dog is experiencing indigestion and there`s nothing left in his stomach to expel, he may start throwing up this pale, frothy liquid or foam.
Gastric hypomotility typically occurs in older dogs, and results in vomiting undigested or partially digested food hours after eating. This cluster of diseases can be primary or secondary, meaning it is caused by a stomach issue vs something outside of the gastrointestinal tract, respectively.
Vomiting is not uncommon with the Beagle breed. It may be acute or chronic and may present by itself or with other troubling symptoms such as diarrhea.
Many cases of dog vomiting result from gastric irritation due to eating inedible objects, spoiled or rich food (raiding the garbage, table scraps), or simply eating too much too fast. Dogs and puppies may also vomit due to motion sickness during car rides or from poisoning or swallowing dangerous objects.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My 5yr old male lab/beagle mix has increased thirst and increased vomiting. Otherwise he acts normal. Any ideas? Thank you
ANSWER : A. it could be a number of things such as diabetes, liver or kidney disease, or Cushing. It is best to have him examined by the vet, who may do lab work and other diagnostics to determine the problem and devise an appropriate treatment plan.

Q. My French Bulldog (11 months) threw up after eating and is dry heaving, plus he’s not acting normal. His breathing is nasally and he’s lethargic. Help
ANSWER : A. Vomiting is a common symptom that can be a sign of numerous health issues ranging from minor digestive upset, to bloat or internal illness. If the vomiting has only occurred once and everything else is normal, a bland diet of plain boiled chicken and white rice can help.

Since your Frenchie is having other issues such as trouble breathing and lethargy, it may be a good idea to contact your vet for advice. Minor digestive upset can cause lethargy due to the energy expended in vomiting, however prolonged symptoms usually indicate something more serious is going on.

Bulldogs are one breed that are prone to bloat (though any breed of dog can be affected), a serious medical emergency. Signs of bloat can include a suddenly painful and bloated abdomen, signs of distress such as heavy panting, whining, or trouble breathing, pale gums and tongue, vomiting and diarrhea, or attempting to vomit or defecate without success. If you suspect your dog may be experiencing bloat please contact your vet or emergency clinic immediately.

Q. Great Dane, Lab mix is vomiting, lethargic, bloodshot droopy eyes. No appetite. What’s wrong?
ANSWER : A. Vomiting is a common symptom of many illnesses which can range anywhere from minor digestive upset, to mores serious problems such as disease, illness or even bloat.

If your Dane Mix has only vomited once or twice, it may just indicate a minor stomach upset. Picking up food for a few hours then feeding a bland meal of boiled chicken and plain rice can help soothe the stomach and entice eating. However, if the vomiting continues or symptoms persist for more than a day, it may indicate something more serious going on and should be looked at by your vet.

Large and giant breed dogs are more prone to a condition called Bloat, which is considered a medical emergency. Signs of bloat in a dog include a large distended abdomen, pain in the abdomen, signs of distress such as heavy panting, pale gums or tongue, vomiting and diarrhea, or attempting to vomit or defecate without success. If you suspect your dog may be experiencing bloat, contacting your vet or emergency clinic immediately is best.

Q. My puppy is throwing up her food this morning and yellow foamy stuff. Please help!
ANSWER : A. If the vomiting has only occurred once, it may be due to the fact that there was something causing a minor upset stomach in your pup. Yellow foam is often acid, and tummies that are upset or that have been empty for too long can cause this to appear in vomit. It may just be that your puppy needs an extra meal in the day to help keep her stomach happy. Eating a meal too quickly can also cause a pup to vomit up undigested food and foam, and feeding smaller meals more often, or slowing down your dog’s eating can help.

If the vomiting has only happened once, pick up your puppy’s food for an hour or two and then offer a bland meal of plain boiled chicken and plain rice. These bland ingredients can help settle upset stomachs while being enticing “people food”. If the vomiting does not occur again, you can return to a normal feeding schedule.

However, if the vomiting continues, worsens, or new symptoms appear along with it, then it is a good idea to schedule an appointment with your vet to rule out any more serious causes.

Q. This morning my dogs urine was the color of weak coffee, she is acting normal and eating fine no fever. She is 1-1/2 years French bull and beagle mix.
ANSWER : A. This color is definitely normal and indicates the presence of pigment, possibly related to blood or liver breakdown products or infection. Highly concentrated urine can appear dark if she has not been well hydrated and if she is in good form otherwise you could increase her water intake by offering flavored water (boil a little chicken or fish and offer her the water; no stock or salted flavors) and monitor for resolution of signs. Any increased frequency of urination, increased color or smell or any discomfort urinating would need investigation. If she is not neutered she may be coming into heat which could result in a colored discharge

Q. My dog is vomiting clear white mucus. It’s day after Christmas. He has thrown up about three times during the night. Can you help. Thanks A. G
ANSWER : A. If your dog’s general appearance is otherwise normal – active, alert, no diarrhea – you can withhold food for 12 hours. If no more vomiting, start feeding small/frequent amounts of a bland diet, like boiled white meat chicken and boiled white rice – 25% chicken, 75% rice. Feed very small amounts to start, like 1/4 cup. Feed every 2 hours, and continue if no more vomiting. Transition back to a normal diet after 12 hours.

If at any time your dog continues to be sick – more vomiting, can’t hold down water, lethargy, etc. – seek emergency veterinary care.

Q. My dog has been throwing up a clear liquid (a little slimey) but otherwise acts fine. Could something be wrong?
ANSWER : A. How long has he been doing this? Ongoing vomiting (>2 weeks) warrants a vet visit, but if it’s a one-off, or happens very infrequently then it could be due to something he ate disagreeing with him. Is he is bright, alert and happy in himself I would monitor him, start keeping a vomit journal (seriously) of when he vomits, how much, what the vomit was like, what he was doing before and any other notes. This will be really useful for your vet if it requires further investigatoon. You can also try bland food – boiled chicken and white rice – in small amounts on his vomit days to give his tummy a rest. Withhold for 8h after a vomit and reintroduce the bland diet in small, frequent meals.

Q. My dog drinks a lot of water, should I worry?
ANSWER : A. Firstly, you should quantify if your dog is actually drinking an excessive amount of water. In a 24 hour period, a dog should drink about 1 fluid ounce (or 30mL) per pound of body weight. Therefore, the recommended amount of water intake (in fluid ounces) equals your dog’s weight (in pounds). For example, if your dog weighs 8 pounds, he/she should drink about a cup of water in a 1 hour period. This will be slightly increased if your dog gets a lot of physical activity or lives outdoors.

You can measure your dog’s water intake the following way: in the morning, measure a specific amount, a little bit more than you think he/she will drink. 24 hours later, measure the remaining amount. If the amount of water your dog drank is significantly greater than it should be, then you should take your dog to a veterinarian.

Causes for mildly increased water consumption include: food changes, increased ambient and body temperature, increased activity, urinary tract infection, and general illness.

Common causes for greatly increased water consumption include: diabetes, urinary tract infection, kidney disease, steroid use, and other systemic diseases. With large increases in water consumption, you will also usually see increased urination. Please take note of urinary patterns to discuss with your vet. Greatly increased drinking and urination is ALWAYS a reason to see a vet.