Help!

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. You need to take her to your vet or emergency vet straight away. If she has been vomiting that much I would be very concerned about dehydration now. She needs to see a vet and probably will need to be hospitalized on iv fluids.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

If your dog has diarrhea for more than 24 hours, if there is blood in the stool, or if your dog is lethargic or also vomiting, it is time to take them to the veterinarian. Be sure to provide easily accessed, fresh water so your pet does not become dehydrated.
Luckily, with prompt and correct treatment, gastroenteritis in dogs can clear up within a few days to a week. However, if it doesn`t seem to be going worse or you notice blood in their stool, take them back to the vet as soon as possible for further treatment.
Most cases resolve quickly but others can take longer and might have an underlying cause. If your dog`s vomiting and diarrhea aren`t resolving quickly or are particularly severe bring them to your veterinarian for a check-up. They can rule out things like parasites, an obstruction, or kidney and liver disease.
Gastroenteritis is inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract (stomach and the intestines). It can be caused by infection with bacteria, viruses, parasites, medications, or even new foods. The condition often causes abdominal pain, diarrhea, vomiting, and other clinical signs.
Some of the signs of parvovirus include lethargy; loss of appetite; abdominal pain and bloating; fever or low body temperature (hypothermia); vomiting; and severe, often bloody, diarrhea. Persistent vomiting and diarrhea can cause rapid dehydration, and damage to the intestines and immune system can cause septic shock.
With proper treatment, your dog`s stomach virus should subside within three to seven days. If symptoms last longer than two weeks, call or visit your veterinarian. To learn more about the symptoms your pet may be experiencing and get advice from our in-house vet, review Gastroenteritis in Dogs.
The survival rate of HGE in dogs can be as high as 95% with the appropriate treatments and therapies. Dogs however that have hypovolemic shock and sepsis can have a guarded to poor prognosis. Hypovolemic shock is a condition that occurs when there is insufficient blood flow to the body tissues.
Fluids given at the veterinary clinic (this helps restore hydration and electrolytes, which are commonly lost via the vomit and diarrhea). Medications for nausea and to help firm up the stool. Treatments for underlying causes (for example, antibiotics or de-wormers).
Basic treatments often include intravenous fluids, medications to help stop the diarrhea (anti-diarrheal medications meant for dogs), dewormers, medications to treat nausea, and possibly pain medications. There are also times basic treatments involve dietary changes.
When signs of parvo start showing, the stool gets more watery, becoming brownish to black diarrhea with traces of blood. After signs of parvo start to show and diarrhea gets bloody and smelly, it`s a race against time because most dog fatalities happen within 2 to 3 days after the symptoms.
Your dog`s diet is the biggest factor in the color and consistency of their feces. Often, diarrhea is caused by a simple change in your dog`s diet, or your dog eating something during a walk that irritates their gut. If your dog is on medication, this can also upset their stomach.
Symptoms caused by swallowed poisons can include: vomiting, diarrhoea, agitation and heart issues. Inhaled toxins may cause breathing difficulties or loss of consciousness in dogs. If your dog`s skin comes in contact with a poisonous substance typical symptoms include irritation and pain.
Symptoms of an intestinal blockage begin

Within hours, the foreign object can become lodged within your dog`s intestinal tract, causing a complete or partial obstruction. Once the obstruction has occurred, clinical signs may develop such as vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain and loss of appetite.

Parvo smell has a unique very bad-smelling poop that is not easy to forget. The smell has been described as metallic, with hints of blood stench since the virus affects the intestinal walls, and a seemingly sweet scent.
Intestinal parasites: Intestinal parasites such as roundworms, hookworms, whipworms, coccidia, and giardia can cause gastrointestinal symptoms that can mimic the parvovirus.
If your dog has just started having diarrhea or vomiting then you can try and treat it yourself at home by feeding small, frequent meals of highly digestible bland diet. If the symptoms do not improve after 24 hours, or if your dog becomes unwell in himself, then you should take your dog to the veterinarian.
Treatment for Gastroenteritis in Dogs

Depending on your dog`s condition and the underlying cause, your veterinarian may administer anti-vomiting medication, antibiotics, and antacid medications specifically formulated for dogs. If your dog is vomiting, the medications will be administered through injection.

If an otherwise healthy, adult dog with mild gastroenteritis signs is bright and is drinking at least their usual volume (even if they`re temporarily off their food) and you can`t see fresh blood or anything resembling coffee grounds in their vomit or diarrhoea, they`ll often recover within 24 to 48 hours with …
The risk to otherwise healthy dogs remains low and we would like to emphasise that owners should continue to walk and exercise their pets as normal, as this is important for dogs` mental and physical health.”
Acute gastroenteritis in dogs is the sudden onset of vomiting and diarrhea. It is one of the most common causes of emergency room visits in dogs and cats. The most common causes of this condition are inflammation, irritation or infection of the lining of the gastrointestinal tract.
Appropriate carbohydrates include cooked rice (white or brown), cooked white potatoes, or cooked oatmeal. Appropriate protein sources include cooked chicken or turkey, lean hamburger (either boiled and drained, or browned and the fat drained and patted off), low fat cottage cheese, or scrambled egg whites.
Take your dog`s food away for 12–24 hours, and don`t give them any treats or table scraps. Leave water out for your dog to drink, but if they tend to “tank up,” keep the water level low to encourage them to drink small amounts frequently. However, there are some dogs that should never go without food.
What are Gastroenteritis? Stomach flu is a form of gastroenteritis that occurs when your dog contracts a virus. This is usually characterized by vomiting and diarrhea. Because the symptoms are not specific to gastroenteritis, you should bring your dog to the veterinarian to rule out other, more serious conditions.
Diarrhea with Vomiting

Vomiting along with diarrhea is common but can quickly lead to dehydration as well. If your dog vomits and has diarrhea more than once or twice, go to the emergency vet, as she may need IV fluids to recover.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My 7 month old Golden Retriever has severe vomiting and diarrhea. She is very lethargic. This has been going on since about 6 this morning. Help!
ANSWER : A. You need to take her to your vet or emergency vet straight away. If she has been vomiting that much I would be very concerned about dehydration now. She needs to see a vet and probably will need to be hospitalized on iv fluids.

Q. Which common foods are poisonous to pets?
ANSWER : A. That’s a great question. As responsible pet owners we need to be aware of food items that can be harmful to our canine or feline companions. Here are some of the most common foods proven to cause illness in our animals at home:

Chocolate: A favorite and irresistible treat amongst most humans, chocolate is considered toxic to dogs. In very small amounts it is usually not a huge issue, but with larger volumes and with darker chocolates pet owners should be concerned. Chocolate contains methylxanthine theobromine, which is similar to caffeine. Chocolate ingestion can cause vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity, issues with normal heartbeats, seizures, and in some severe cases, death. It is best to keep your favorite chocolate treats in a good hiding spot and out of reach of your dog or cat.

Grapes and raisins: Dogs should not consume grapes and raisins because of the risk of acute kidney failure. Most dogs experiencing grape or raisin toxicity will begin to have vomiting and/or diarrhea within 6-12 hours of ingestion. Other abnormal clinical signs include lethargy, abdominal pain, dehydration, and tremors. Kidney failure develops within 24-72 hours of the initial ingestion. There are some dogs that do not experience these devastating side effects. It is best to contact your veterinarian or veterinary emergency facility if you believe your pet has ingested grapes or raisins.

Garlic and onions: We often forget that our meals contain these two popular ingredients and will allow our furry companions a few bites or licks. Onion and garlic both can cause a type of poisoning that results in damage to red blood cells, making them more likely to rupture. They can also cause stomach upset and mouth irritation. Look for pale gums, increased breathing or drooling or any vomiting or diarrhea.

Bread dough: Unbaked bread dough is considered poisonous to our pets. The bread dough, when ingested, expands in the stomach because of the warm and moist environment. This can lead to a bloated or even twisted stomach. In addition yeast is often added to our baking products to help get bread to rise, and when this yeast is fermented it produces both carbon dioxide and alcohol. The alcohol produced can be absorbed into the bloodstream and causes dangerous drops in blood sugar, blood pressure and body temperature. Common clinical signs include vomiting or retching, distension of the stomach, weakness and collapse.

Macadamia nuts: Ingestion of these nuts are not proven to be fatal in dogs but can cause them to experience uncomfortable clinical sings, including fever, joint stiffness, vomiting, tremors and difficulty walking, especially in their hind legs. Often your pet will start to feel better after about 48 hours, but supportive veterinary care (such as pain medication) may help ease their discomfort.

Xylitol: The most common ingredient used in sugar-free gum is xylitol, which is a non-caloric sweetener. It is also found in some oral rinses, toothpastes and vitamins. Xylitol and dogs do not mix – it can cause a dangerous drop in blood sugars levels. Dogs will often display signs of disorientation, black tarry stool, tremors and seizures. If severe enough some dogs have developed liver failure. Keep your gum away from your canine companion.

Avocados: Avocados are not actually poisonous to dogs or cats but as many veterinarians can tell you the avocado pits can cause a foreign body obstruction. Avocados contain persin, which is actually toxic to the majority of pet birds. The abnormal clinical signs associated with avocado ingestion in birds include, respiratory distress, inability to perch, liver and kidney failure and sudden death.

Go forth and enjoy your favorite foods, but keep in mind which foods you should avoid sharing with your furry family members. Whenever in doubt, contact your veterinarian for healthy and safe food suggestions.

Q. My dog has suffered from diarrhea with vomit and bloody stools for about 3 months. Vet has given Metronidazole, but hasn’t been effective
ANSWER : A. Several things can cause a dog’s diarrhea, and chronic diarrhea can sometimes be hard to treat. However the most common causes of chronic diarrhea can be from food allergies to certain ingredients in the diet as well as a disruption in the gut bacteria. Metronidazole helps with chronic diarrhea in some cases if there is an underlying bacterial condition. Checking your dog’s food for common allergens such as wheat, corn or soy products may alert you to a problem as these can cause a lot of digestive issues in some dogs. Some dogs may also be allergic to more common protein types such as beef, lamb or even chicken, so finding a food with an alternate protein source can also help. Natural remedies to help clear up diarrhea can also include adding plain yogurt to meals to seed the gut with healthy bacteria, or adding pureed pumpkin to provide a fiber boost to firm up stools. However, if these things don’t help with the diarrhea, additional testing and treatment with your vet is best.

Read Full Q/A … : Causes of Blood in Dog Stool

Q. Wants to go out very frequently. Has fecal matter attached to anus but won’t let me remove it. She won’t sleep and wants to stay on my lap.
ANSWER : A. So I’m hearing a couple of problems going on. Frequent defecation with diarrhea (I’m assuming, since there’s fecal matter attached and the anus, and typically it only “sticks” when it’s soft) and lethargy/clinginess. Pretty general signs, however let’s focus on the diarrhea and assume it’s a GI thing. You didn’t tell me whether this is a cat or dog but I’ll assume dog since you said she goes outside to defecate.

Diarrhea may or may not be a sign of a serious disease. I don’t get especially concerned with one or two episodes in an animal who seems to feel completely normally otherwise, but what you’re describing sounds concerning. Your dog is restless, can’t get comfortable, and is somewhat needy – all of those indicate discomfort to me.

Without knowing how old your dog is it’s pretty difficult to get specific about causes, but I’ll mention some possibilities. Certainly parasites, including giardia, can cause diarrhea, as well as bacterial or viral infections in the gut. Indiscriminate eating, which dogs are master of, can cause diarrhea. Food allergies or sensitivities as well as inflammatory bowel disease are on the list. More serious causes include liver, kidney, or pancreatic disease, as well as intestinal cancers.

I’m hoping this has only been going on for a little while. You can try feeding a bland/high-fiber diet of boiled white meat chicken and white rice (25% chicken and 75% rice) in small (1/4 to 1/2 cup) amounts frequently (every two hours). If the diarrhea doesn’t resolve in 12 hours see a veterinarian. If she’s vomiting or won’t eat at all, see a vet sooner.

Read Full Q/A … : Leerburg

Q. My cat will not eat the renal food my veterinarian recommended, can I feed a grocery store food?
ANSWER : A. Your veterinarian recommended a therapeutic kidney diet because it has ingredients that will help slow the progression of your cat’s conditions, especially phosphorus and lower protein levels. Many of the non-prescription or grocery store foods generally have high levels of phosphorus and would not be ideal for your cat.

To help your cat accept the new food It is important to do a transition. There are two reasons to do a transition:

1) Occasionally a pet will have a GI upset when switched to a new diet,

2) A pet will accept a new food better when a transition is done to allow the pet to get use to the new texture and flavor.

There is more of a chance with a hydrolyzed protein or different (high or low) fiber level food to cause a GI upset. Transition recommendation:

1) Recommend ¾ old diet – ¼ new diet

2) Do this for a few days; if no GI upset, go to the next step

3) ½ old diet – ½ new diet

4) Do this for a few days; if no GI upset, go to the next step

5) ¼ old diet – ¾ new diet

6) Do this for a few days; if no GI upset, go to the next step

7) End with 100% of the new food.

Sometimes a transition should be longer, especially for cats. Use the same recommendation, but instead of a few days, recommend doing each step for a week or more. If you cat is still not interested in the new diet you can research other non-prescription diets focusing on the labels for appropriate levels of phosphorus and protein.

Also, home cooking may be an option but make sure to provide adequate nutrients. A good website to consult is balanceit.com. This website helps you to create well balanced home cooked recipes and offers supplements to add into the diet.

Q. My French Bulldog (11 months) threw up after eating and is dry heaving, plus he’s not acting normal. His breathing is nasally and he’s lethargic. Help
ANSWER : A. Vomiting is a common symptom that can be a sign of numerous health issues ranging from minor digestive upset, to bloat or internal illness. If the vomiting has only occurred once and everything else is normal, a bland diet of plain boiled chicken and white rice can help.

Since your Frenchie is having other issues such as trouble breathing and lethargy, it may be a good idea to contact your vet for advice. Minor digestive upset can cause lethargy due to the energy expended in vomiting, however prolonged symptoms usually indicate something more serious is going on.

Bulldogs are one breed that are prone to bloat (though any breed of dog can be affected), a serious medical emergency. Signs of bloat can include a suddenly painful and bloated abdomen, signs of distress such as heavy panting, whining, or trouble breathing, pale gums and tongue, vomiting and diarrhea, or attempting to vomit or defecate without success. If you suspect your dog may be experiencing bloat please contact your vet or emergency clinic immediately.

Q. My puppy is throwing up her food this morning and yellow foamy stuff. Please help!
ANSWER : A. If the vomiting has only occurred once, it may be due to the fact that there was something causing a minor upset stomach in your pup. Yellow foam is often acid, and tummies that are upset or that have been empty for too long can cause this to appear in vomit. It may just be that your puppy needs an extra meal in the day to help keep her stomach happy. Eating a meal too quickly can also cause a pup to vomit up undigested food and foam, and feeding smaller meals more often, or slowing down your dog’s eating can help.

If the vomiting has only happened once, pick up your puppy’s food for an hour or two and then offer a bland meal of plain boiled chicken and plain rice. These bland ingredients can help settle upset stomachs while being enticing “people food”. If the vomiting does not occur again, you can return to a normal feeding schedule.

However, if the vomiting continues, worsens, or new symptoms appear along with it, then it is a good idea to schedule an appointment with your vet to rule out any more serious causes.

Q. Nursing dog pups 13 days old has sudden onset of diarrhea and vomiting what can I do
ANSWER : A. You can try with holding food for 12 hours. Offer unflavored Pedialyte if she’ll drink. If she doesn’t vomit or have diarrhea for those 12 hours you can then offer small amounts of a bland diet such as boiled white meat chicken (25%) and boiled white rice (75%) without flavoring or fat added. Offer about 1/4 cup every 2 hours. If she continues to do well and has an appetite do this for 12 hours, then transition back to a normal diet slowly. If she continues to have vomiting or diarrhea I think it’s important that you seek veterinary care, since continual loss of fluid through vomiting and diarrhea while nursing is very dangerous to any dog, but especially to a very small dog like a chihuahua.