m worried.

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. It may be an allergy to something in her diet or something that she has come into contact with. I would make an appointment with your local vet for an examination.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Folliculitis

Folliculitis means inflamed hair follicles and often occurs when your dog is experiencing another skin problems such as mange or skin allergies, as the hair follicles become infected by the underlying skin condition. It appears on the body in sores, bumps and scabs over the skin.

Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa is an inherited skin disorder identified in a closely related family of Basset hounds. Affected dogs typically present at birth with disseminate skin lesions resembling erosions or blisters. These lesions are present on the paw pads, ears, and muzzle.
Watch for these signs: Firm, raised wart-like blemishes (squamous cell carcinomas) Rubber-like, inflamed sores (mast cell tumors) Strange-colored lumps or bumps on the lips, mouth, pads of feet, toenail beds (melanomas)
Widespread scabs are often caused by underlying allergies or a dog skin infection. Allergies to fleas, food proteins or environmental allergens (such as pollen) can lead to widespread skin inflammation. When the skin becomes inflamed and damaged, scabs often develop.
While not a medical problem per se, stress has been linked to many skin problems in dogs. This can lead their fur to fall out, for them to excessively lick or bite themselves or even cause rashes if their anxiety is really heightened.
Rashes and other skin ailments can be caused by a variety of things, including allergies, parasites, underlying medical conditions, and even behavioral issues like boredom or stress. For the best treatment, it`s helpful to determine what caused the rash in the first place.
Most bassets live to 12 or 13 years. Having developed as pack animals, basset hounds do feel a need for company and are happiest when they have their families around. They are not great watchdogs. Although they may bark, but they then greet strangers happily.
Horner`s syndrome is a common neurological disorder of the eye and facial muscles. The condition usually occurs suddenly and typically affects one side of the head but can be bilateral (affect both sides of the head) in rare cases.
The true skin form looks like a rosy red or even black growth on the skin. This form is frequently associated with sun exposure and thus tends to form on non-haired or sparsely haired skin, such as on the abdomen, or on areas with white fur.
Is your dog feeling itchy, or does his skin appear flaky, moist or crusty? He may have a bacterial or fungal infection. You may also notice, odor, inflammation or redness. Yeast dermatitis or staph infection can bring these symptoms, along with recurring health issues.
Mites are tiny spider-like creatures that can typically only be seen with a microscope, but sometimes they may be visible as tiny orange, black or white dots moving on your dog`s skin.
You may notice a very fine rash or just the itching at first. Over time the skin becomes very red, there is hair loss and flaking skin. Areas where hair is thinner (ears, elbows, ankles, belly) tend to be the most severely affected. However, some dogs may have a different pattern or no symptoms at all.
Stressed dogs, like stressed people, may have dilated pupils and blink rapidly. They may open their eyes really wide and show more sclera (white) than usual, giving them a startled appearance. Ears that are usually relaxed or alert are pinned back against the head. Changes in body posture.
Short-lived stressors can trigger bouts of vomiting, diarrhea, or changes in behavior and eating patterns, and chronic stress is known to increase the chances of developing serious and sometimes lifelong disorders, such as heart disease and diabetes.
Environmental allergies, like contact dermatitis or reactions to something on the ground like fertilizer, cleaning products, poison ivy, or other irritants, flea allergy dermatitis, and food allergies, food sensitivities, and food intolerance can lead to itchy bumps and rashes.
Just as with humans who bite their nails or develop other obsessive habits when nervous, dogs can turn to itching when they are experiencing anxiety. If, for instance, you`ve noticed your dog is itching, chewing, or biting at their skin just after you`ve returned to work, they could be experiencing separation anxiety.
These dogs can have food allergies to wheat, corn, and chicken, so we usually recommend a lamb, venison, or duck version of these commercial dog foods.
Breeds predisposed to developing allergies include Chinese Shar-Peis, Wirehaired Fox Terriers, Golden Retrievers, Dalmatians, Boxers, Boston Terriers, Labrador Retrievers, Lhasa Apsos, Scottish Terriers, Shih Tzus, and West Highland White Terriers. However, any dog of any breed (or mixed breeds) can be allergic.
Basset Hounds will normally live to ten years of age but can live up to 12 years when given lots of love and attention as well as being fed the correct diet.
With a lifespan that ranges from 12 to 13 years, the average Basset Hound lives for about 12.5 years, which is longer than the average dog life expectancy. They are prone to certain health issues like ear infection, gastric torsion, hip dysplasia and others.
Drooping of the upper eyelid (ptosis) Slight elevation of the lower lid, sometimes called upside-down ptosis. Sunken appearance of the affected eye. Little or no sweating (anhidrosis) on the affected side of the face.
Unfortunately, no clinical signs (symptoms) are classic for hemangiosarcoma other than sudden, profound, internal bleeding. Other clinical signs reported by owners include: Intermittent lethargy or fatigue. Anorexia.
Though it`s impossible to pinpoint the exact cause of this cancer, a combination of genetic and environmental factors is assumed. In pets who suffer the skin (cutaneous) version, exposure to sunlight is considered a significant risk factor. Unfortunately, the prognosis for most hemangiosarcoma patients is poor.
In most cases, the cause of hemangiosarcoma is unknown. Exposure to sunlight can cause skin tumors in some dogs, especially in thinly haired regions including the belly, inner thighs, and eyelids.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My 9 year old female basset hound recently has started getting sores all over her body. She has medical history but nothing skin related. I’m worried.
ANSWER : A. It may be an allergy to something in her diet or something that she has come into contact with. I would make an appointment with your local vet for an examination.

Q. My cat is excessively scrstching herself., to the point she has sores. She is strictly an indoor cat. Did have flees been treated for 2 months
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. What can I get over the counter for Dermatitis in a 18 pound long haired Doxie?
ANSWER : A. Dermatitis can be caused by a number of things in dogs ranging from allergies, skin infections caused by bacteria or fungus, skin dryness from changes in the weather or too frequent bathing or even from external parasites. Determining the cause of the dermatitis first is best before treating it.

If allergies are thought to be the cause, allergy medication can be given to help relieve symptoms. Your vet can provide you with the correct dosage for your dog’s size of over the counter medications. In more serious cases, stronger allergy medications may need to be prescribed. For dry or flaky skin, using a shampoo that is for sensitive skin or oatmeal based can help soothe it. Lowering the frequency of baths and instead using a pet wipe or baby wipe to keep your dog clean will also help sooth the skin. For external parasites, starting on a preventive treatment plan of flea and tick medication will help stop fleas from biting and allow the skin to heal.

If you suspect a more serious causes such as bacterial or fungal infection, or your dog does not improve with treatment, making a wellness check with your vet is best. Your vet can thoroughly examine the skin and may also recommend additional tests to check for any underlying causes such as infection, hormonal imbalance or illness.

Q. My 12 year old cat is constantly grooming and scratching to the extent that she is pulling her hair out in spots. She is also losing weight.
ANSWER : A. Weight loss in older cats, especially when coupled with continued or increased appetite can indicate diabetes or hyperthyroidism. I recommend getting your cat in to see your vet as soon as possible for an exam and comprehensive labwork.

Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. 8 year old Harrier mix recently started excessive licking in groin. now very red with hair loss. bitter cherry doesn’t prevent. no change in diet.
ANSWER : A. This is probably due to a severe allergy, although it could also be fleas or mites.

First of all, in order to rule out skin parasites, you will need to treat her with a high quality flea treatment (e.g. advocate or advantage), then get her to the vet to perform a skin scrape – this might revile an infection or a mite infestation.

If all of those came back negative, the next step is to treat the allergy symptomatically and try discovering the cause of the allergy.

Some medications can be given by the vet in order to stop the chewing and repair the skin lesions (steroids and antibiotics). simultaneously you should start her on a prescription hypoallergenic diet for at least 2 months.

There is also a nice topical spray available if the problem remains in the groin area, it’s called Cortavance and you can get it at the vets.

Hopefully you will see some results after all this, if not you and your vet should consider putting her on a long term allergy treatment (Atopica or Apoquel).

Read Full Q/A … : Spaying and Neutering

Q. My 4 year old Chihuahua mix began having a series shaking/panting episodes (last 15m- 1hr) out of the blue. Vet’s tests say its not physical.
ANSWER : A. There are many causes for shaking/panting. The shaking and panting are both signs of stress, and your dog may be dealing with anxiety, or stress, related to an event that happened, or is happening. I realize you cannot answer questions on this, however, I will ask some questions that you can ask yourself. Have you recently moved? Have you ever hit or yelled at your dog? Has the weather been bad lately (storms)? Have you had any new guests stay over recently? Have you had any dogs come to your home recently? Have you had any dogs or cats in your yard recently? Was your dog frightened by something initially (a falling pot/pan; a loud bang from the washing machine; a gunshot; a backfiring car/truck; someone screaming in your home/a fight)?

If you answered yes to any of those questions, it could definitely be that. Dogs don’t typically hang on to something for very long, but if it really frightened your pup, then she/he could be feeling serious anxiety related to that specific event, and relating other events to that one.

Do not yell, or hit your dog. I’m not assuming you do, but if you do, please stop doing that right away. It could be that your dog is afraid of you specifically, and you notice the shaking/panting when you are near, because that is the only time your dog is doing it.

If you’d like to purchase a consultation with me (I know, it’s a lot to ask, but I really feel like I could help) I’d be more than happy to ask you many questions, and together we can figure out what the heck is going on here. It’s important that your dog is comfortable, and if your pup is always feeling anxious/uneasy, then his/her quality of life is in jeopardy.

Q. My cocker spaniel is 9 years old. He has involuntary bowel movements (little drops) very frequently, especially when he is asleep.
ANSWER : A. Is your dog on a senior dog food? I would get your dog on a high quality high protien dog food. Ask a pet store assosicate or your regular vet for a food recommendation. When you buy a better food the dog will have to eat less to get the same amount of energy from the food. The dog has to eat more of the cheaper foods to get the energy it needs from it. Meaning more poop and buying more food. So the cost really evens out. So the lessen your dogs bowel movements get on a better senior dog food. Next talk to your vet they may have a recommendation. If you switch dogs do it slowly by mixing the foods. Start with 10% new 90% old mixed for at least a week until you have switched to 100% new 0% old. Senior foods have more fiber to help with bowel movements. Take the dog outside to go potty more frequently, right before bed time.

Read Full Q/A … : Symptoms Questions & Answers

Q. Yes hello my blue nose 7 mouth old puppy has has hot spots and I wanna know what can I do to get it off my dog
ANSWER : A. Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.