Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Tylenol and Advil are actually toxic to dogs and cats and should never be given. If your dog is experiencing pain, I would recommend that you call your vet’s office and they can suggest some pet friendly pain medication.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

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Most OTC (over-the-counter) pain medications that are made for people, such as naproxen or ibuprofen, should never be given to dogs. Even at very small doses, they can cause life-threatening gastrointestinal (GI) ulcers, liver failure, and/or kidney failure.
Many pain medications considered safe for people can be toxic or even fatal for dogs. Never give your dog aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil), acetaminophen (Tylenol), or any other medication designed for humans without first consulting your vet.
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly used to control pain and inflammation in dogs. NSAIDs help many dogs lead more comfortable lives, but these drugs should be used carefully because they all can cause side effects, some of which can be serious.
Can I give Ibuprofen to my Pet? Do not give Ibuprofen to your dog or cat under any circumstances. Ibuprofen and naproxen are common and effective medications used to treat inflammation and pain in humans, but they should not be given to pets. These drugs can be toxic (poisonous) to dogs and cats.
Tylenol can, in rare instances, be safely used in dogs; however, not only must the dose be carefully calculated by a veterinarian, but the dog`s bloodwork requires frequent evaluation to ensure that no long term damage is occurring.
A dose as small as 200mg (one tablet) of ibuprofen may be toxic to small dogs and damage the stomach lining or kidneys. Larger dosages can cause ulcers, seizures, coma, or death.
Can dogs have Tylenol or Ibuprofen? No, you should never give your dog Tylenol or Ibuprofen. Human NSAIDs, including Ibuprofen and Tylenol, can be toxic to dogs, even in small doses, according to rover.com.
Can I give my dog Acetaminophen (Tylenol; paracetamol)? No. Like ibuprofen and aspirin, these medications were formulated for humans and can cause kidney or liver damage in dogs.
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs for dogs): Relieve pain associated with surgeries and arthritis including swelling, stiffness, and joint pain. Both Metacam and Previcox fall under this class of medication.
Vets usually prescribe aspirin for dogs with osteoarthritis or musculoskeletal inflammation. The anti-inflammatory properties of aspirin help reduce the pain and inflammation associated with these conditions and can offer your dog relief from symptoms.
While you can use human baby aspirin as recommended by your vet, aspirin made for dogs is typically a better option. Human aspirin has a coating on it that helps to protect the human stomach from irritation. Your dog cannot digest this coating, so the medication may not provide the desired effects.
For dogs and cats, acetaminophen (Tylenol) is toxic (poisonous or deadly)! Relatively small doses (a single pill or even a small piece of a pill) can be toxic or deadly to any animal species (cats, dogs, ferrets, birds, pigs, primates, and many others).
For dogs, ibuprofen can easily exceed toxic levels. Ibuprofen has a narrow margin of safety in dogs. Signs of toxicosis can occur when as little as half a 200 mg pill is given to a 25 pound dog. The most common cause of ibuprofen toxicity is a well-meaning owner trying to alleviate pain in his dog.
Although relatively safe in humans, ibuprofen and other NSAIDs can be extremely harmful to dogs. Poisoning may happen when pets get into the owner`s medications. In some cases, owners may administer ibuprofen to treat their pet`s pain prior to consulting a veterinarian.
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, help reduce swelling, stiffness, and joint pain in humans, and they can do the same for your dog. They can bring relief to a dog with arthritis or one who`s just had surgery.
Many vets do prescribe paracetamol for dogs, as it can be an effective pain relief in some circumstances. However, before doing so, they will carefully calculate a safe dose, taking into account any health issues your dog has, and any other medications they are taking,” PDSA Vet, Claire Roberts, tells Country Living.
Acetaminophen can cause liver damage or decrease the red blood cell`s ability to carry oxygen (methemoglobinemia). Dogs may become depressed or weak, with rapid breathing, a high heart rate, panting, abdominal pain, vomiting or drooling. Affected dogs may also stop eating.
Paracetamol can kill dogs even in a small overdose.

Side effects or symptoms of overdose of paracetamol in dogs can include liver damage, ulceration of the digestive tract, pale gums, vomiting, drooling, abdominal pain, breathing difficulties, or seizures.

No, you can`t give dogs Ibuprofen. Ibuprofen is an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) created for human consumption and it`s not safe for dogs in any dose. Humans and dogs have very different anatomy and body sizes, so you should never give human medicines to dogs.
It is recommended to give buffered aspirin if possible. 1 baby aspiring/ 10 pounds body weight given every 12 hours. 1 adult aspirin/40 pounds body weight given every 12 hours. Do not exceed 2 tablets for any dog.
Pain Medication

You can give your dog NSAIDs, but you must be cautious. Consult with a vet if you want to give your dog pain medication for period cramps.

To help reduce a pet`s fever—103 degrees or higher—first apply cool water around his paws and ears. You can use a soaked towel or cloth, or a dog cooling vest. Continue to monitor his temperature, and when it drops below 103, you can stop applying the water. See if you can coax him into drinking a bit of water.
Mild swelling may resolve on its own, but you still need a vet to check your pet out and determine why their face swelled up. If the cause is due to dental disease, treatments can range from cleaning to tooth removal.
Redness or hair loss

If you notice that your dog`s fur is starting to thin or fall out entirely near the wound or bite location, this may be signs of a worsening infection. If you part the fur and observe redness, swelling, or even a crust where the wound is– you should be prepared to call the vet.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My 90# American Bulldog has a sore that is red and swollen. Can I give her Tylenol or Advil for the pain and redness tonight? How much?
ANSWER : A. Tylenol and Advil are actually toxic to dogs and cats and should never be given. If your dog is experiencing pain, I would recommend that you call your vet’s office and they can suggest some pet friendly pain medication.

Q. My dog has hip problems. Can I give him Aleve or other aspirin to help with the pain?
ANSWER : A. Do NOT give your dog over the counter pain medications such as Aleve, Ibuprofen or Aspirin unless specifically instructed by your vet. These medications can cause serious problems such as ulceration of the stomach, or kidney/liver dysfunction if given in the wrong dosage or too often.

If your dog is experiencing painful hips, your vet can provide you with pain medications that are designed for use in dogs. These medications are much safer to give and have fewer side effects. Additionally, supplements with glucosamine and chondroitin may help to relieve pain and soreness associated with hip problems.

Q. How much Tylenol to I give my dog for her pain?
ANSWER : A. Tylenol (acetaminophen – the active ingredient in the United States) has been shown to be TOXIC when given to dogs and cats and should never be used as a pain reliever for your pets. Please do not give this medication to your dog. If your dog is in pain please seek the advice of your veterinarian and ask for pet friendly pain medication.

Q. Can you give a dog a Tylenol 3?
ANSWER : A. Do not give your dog any pain medications such as Tylenol or Advil unless specifically instructed by your vet. These medications can be very harmful to dogs and can cause ulceration of the stomach as well as organ failure if given too often or in the wrong dosage. If your dog is experiencing pain, your vet can recommend a safer dog-friendly medication to help ease pain. If you are in an emergency situation where your dog needs pain relief fast, it is best to contact your vet or an emergency clinic in your area for further help.

Q. How much Tylenol can I give a 32 pound Terrier mix who is 11 years old and having pain in his mouth. Trying to make it until 8am to get to his vet.
ANSWER : A. Tylenol and Advil are actually toxic to dogs and cats and should never be given. If your dog is experiencing pain, I would recommend that you call your vet’s office and they can suggest some pet friendly pain medication.

Q. Possible back disc issues with my dog. Working with vet through meds, I am giving my dog Tylenol 80 mg. twice daily. Is it ok to give more than twice?
ANSWER : A. It’s really strange that your vet is advising you to give Tylenol , as it can be toxic to dogs and has very little pain relief effect. If your dog has got disc issues he will need see a neurologist to check him over ASAP. With regards to your question, I would not recommend giving paracetamol at all.. But there are more effective pain relief options. It is also important that urination is monitored and helped, we often have to use catheters to do so.

Q. My 5 year old Dachshund has broken his rear leg. A trip to the vet is impossible for two more days (rural area), can I give him something for pain?
ANSWER : A. If your dog has a broken leg, then veterinary care is a must. If you can get into contact with your local vet before seeing him or her, they may be able to give you information on an OTC pain medication that could be safe to give dogs. Do not attempt to give any medications without first consulting your vet as many pain meds can cause kidney/liver failure or stomach ulceration if given to dogs. In the meantime, keep your dog on strict kennel or bed rest and only taking him out for short potty breaks is best to keep pain down and from letting the leg get further injured.

Q. Shiba Inu. He periodically shakes and trembles, usually unrpovoked and seeming for no reason. Usually cuddling helps but not always. Becomes reclusive
ANSWER : A. I do find that Shiba Inu’s are a really sensitive breed. I think the first thing to rule out is pain. That could be pain from a muscle injury or even gastrointestinal pain. Try to pinpoint whether it occurs after a meal or not. He might be painful due to something going on in his GI tract, and the pain is at its worse after he eats.

I’ve also seen a lot of small breeds like Shibas get back pain, and shaking can definitely accompany that as well. If you haven’t see your vet who can perform a good physical exam and look for any signs of muscular pain along the spine or elsewhere. It’s not a bad idea at this point to consider doing some blood work just to screen for any problems that could be affecting organ function, for example.

If he’s healthy otherwise, I think it’s likely that there’s something that’s scaring him at home. These things can be really difficult to identify, and you have to be really aware and note exactly when the shaking occurs, how long it lasts, etc, and look for patterns. Dogs can hear things we can’t, and he may be hearing things you’re missing, and the noise is disturbing to him. Cuddling is a good idea, also working to distract him and desensitize him with toys and treats might help. But like I said above – definitely rule out pain first.