ing worse.

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. I believe it is time for more aggressive diagnostics. Your puppy should have blood work performed to look for underlying issues as well as an x-ray. This may help to localize the cause of the problem. It is likely that your puppy has an infection but without further diagnostics it is difficult to determine the cause and to pick the best antibiotic.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Why is my puppy being sick? It`s common for puppies to suffer from vomiting and diarrhoea. Puppies throw up for a variety of reasons, including the stress of rehoming, parasites such as worms and amoebae, bacterial infections, viral infections, and, of course, dietary indiscretion (eating something they shouldn`t).
If your dog has a fever above 102.5ºF, that warrants a visit to the veterinarian. It is considered an emergency if your dog is extremely lethargic, has blood in their stool or vomit, stops eating, or has a fever above 104.5ºF.
If your dog`s fever is 106° F or higher immediately take your dog to a local veterinary emergency clinic. If your dog has a fever, of 103° F or more, you can help to cool your dog`s body temperature by applying cool water with a soaked towel or cloth to your dog`s ears and paws and running a fan near your dog.
Many sick dogs will sleep more than usual, but have worse sleep quality. Pain and discomfort can get in the way of a good night`s sleep, which is key for healthy, happy dogs.
Next, you should encourage them to lie down in their bed or somewhere else where they can rest. Finally, while they`re sick, feed your puppy a bland diet, as well as small amounts of water to keep them healthy and hydrated. If they can`t keep down water without vomiting, take them to the vet immediately.
Dog fevers can resolve on their own as their body naturally fights off the infection causing the fever. However, some infections can`t be fought off easily by the body and will need veterinary intervention.
In some cases, your dog may have a low-grade fever after receiving a vaccine. This should resolve itself in 24 -48 hours but you`ll want to carefully monitor your pet to make sure the fever breaks.
A dog with a fever will have a temperature of 103 degrees F or higher, and he will often show symptoms such as panting, lethargy or acting tired, and shivering. His ears may feel hot and be red. If the fever is related to illness you might notice other signs such as vomiting, diarrhea, or coughing.
While some puppies are more laid back than others, lethargy (low energy) is sometimes indicative of a health issue. Anything from an infection to pain to obesity can cause lethargy. If your puppy seems unusually lethargic, call your veterinarian to find out the root cause.
Dogs cannot drink milk. While high in calcium and protein, cow`s milk shouldn`t be a part of your dog`s diet because it can upset their stomach and cause long-term health problems.
Try giving your sick pooch a small portion as a way to stimulate the appetite. Flavors to try are chicken, beef, sweet potato, banana, and carrot. While not a good idea to feed your dog too much baby food, using it as a way to motivate them to eat is fine. Sometimes just a taste will do.
For mild cases of Kennel Cough, a sick puppy can easily recover from just a couple of weeks of rest. However, more severe cases will need cough medicine and an antibiotic. It usually takes about 14 days for a puppy to recover, but this will vary by case.
How Long Can a Dog Go Without Food? Dogs can usually go three to five days without food, however, this is not ideal. If your dog has gone two days without food, it is highly recommended you call a veterinarian if you haven`t already. More important than your dog eating is their water intake.
If your dog has a fever, try to see that they drink small amounts of water on a regular basis to stay hydrated, but don`t force it. And never give your dog any human medicines intended to lower fever, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen, as they can be poisonous to dogs and cause severe injury or death.
Most dogs with a fever are lethargic, reluctant to move, have a loss of appetite, have increased heart and breathing rates, and are dehydrated. They may also be shivering or showing stiffness. With a fever of unknown origin, these clinical signs are present but there is no obvious cause for them.
Place your pet in a cool, but not cold, bath for a minimum of 5 and a maximum of 10 minutes. This should help to lower their temperature.
If your pooch`s temperature rises above 103° F, your dog has a fever. A temperature above 106° F means your pup`s temperature is in dangerous territory. He is at risk for serious, potentially fatal complications.
If your pup`s temperature rises above 103 F your dog has a fever. 106 F is a very high fever in dogs and is an indication that your pet is very sick and at risk of serious, possibly fatal complications.
You should never give your dog paracetamol to treat a fever or any other condition unless instructed by a vet. Paracetamol can be highly toxic to dogs if they are given the wrong amount.
Eggs can be a great source of protein for sick dogs. They are easy to digest and dogs usually love them.
It`s important never to give paracetamol to your dog unless your vet tells you to – it can be very dangerous if it`s given incorrectly.” Claire explains that you should always head to your vet for advice, including if your pup accidentally digests a painkiller.
For the best chances of saving a fading pup, contact a veterinarian at the first sign of trouble, like excessive crying or difficulty nursing. Ensuring that the pups nurse, maintaining their body temperature, and offering emergency care are your most effective options.
Puppies sleep for 18 to 20 hours in a day. If your puppy is energetic when they are awake, then your puppy is normal. If your puppy is lazy when they`re awake, then it can be related to illness, stress, environmental factors, or genetics. If unsure, always take your puppy to the vet.
To get your dog motivated to move around and exercise, try playing hide-and-go-seek with some toys or treats. Hide treats indoors or outdoors and let them run around, searching for their hidden prize.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My cat is excessively scrstching herself., to the point she has sores. She is strictly an indoor cat. Did have flees been treated for 2 months
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. My 13 year old male cat is acting lethargic & doesn’t seem to be feeling well. I don’t know what’s wrong except that he has fleas. Can too many fleas
ANSWER : A. Excessive fleas can cause anemia in cats, left untreated, this can be life-threatening. I recommend getting your cat seen by your vet right away for his illness. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard, since fleas will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Q. How do I FINALLY rid all 4 of my cats of tapeworms after 2 years of dealing with it? Fleas seem to be controlled. I know they are the vector.
ANSWER : A. If your cats keep getting tapeworms, then they are picking up fleas from somewhere. Fleas will hitch a ride on your pant leg from outside.

Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

You can also use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the life cycle.

Q. Need help, we have done flea bath ,sprayed the house and used charts ultra guard pro and still have fleas .how can we get rid of them
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Q. We have a 3 yr old Weiner dog, she is having pus in her eyes, I took her to the vet he gave me derma vet ointment, used it as the doctor prescribed
ANSWER : A. If the pus really isn’t all that bad, and it’s just some discharge, your pup may benefit from a diet change. It could be that the food you’re feeding just isn’t right for your dog, and that’s okay! Dogs grow and change over time, and now that your dog is fully matured, a diet change may be in order. Try something like Taste of the Wild, maybe a grain free dog food, Orijen, or Ziwipeak. These are all really great food options.

If the pus is really bad, and continues to get worse, see your vet again and let them know what’s going on. Maybe you could try a diet change, and then see if there are any improvements.

Remember, you should always gradually change a dogs diet. By gradually, I mean you put a tiny bit of new kibble in with a bowl of the old kibble. Reduce the old kibble by just a few bits of kibble. Throughout the course of at least two weeks (or as long as you want depending on whether or not you want to finish off the old food) you slowly add more of the new kibble while removing some of the old kibble. This makes the process gradual, and won’t cause any tummy-upset in your dog.

Q. My 9months old pup is sick. He has fever, doesn’t play,sleeps all day. A vet gave him antibiotics,but they did nothing to him. He keeps getting worse.
ANSWER : A. I believe it is time for more aggressive diagnostics. Your puppy should have blood work performed to look for underlying issues as well as an x-ray. This may help to localize the cause of the problem. It is likely that your puppy has an infection but without further diagnostics it is difficult to determine the cause and to pick the best antibiotic.

Read Full Q/A … : Symptoms of Sick Dogs

Q. My dogs were given Hartz ultrguard seven days ago. Can they be given frontline now because they still have fleas
ANSWER : A. In flea control, you get what you pay for. I would wait one more week before applying another product.

For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

Q. Kitten showed up at my door. Was fine till two days ago, now cant poop and wont eat. Very listless and blotted
ANSWER : A. Thank you for taking care of this kitten! It sounds like the kitten may be quite sick. First, you can try to stimulate it to poop by rubbing its anus gently with a warm, damp washcloth. If this doesn’t work, you should go to the vet right away – don’t wait until Monday – because a kitten who’s not eating can become hypoglycemic and get dangerously sick fast. Even if it gets better today, you should make a vet appointment soon because it will need to be dewormed – it almost certainly has parasites – and to get vaccinated depending on how old it is.