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Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. If she has breathing difficulties then you should take her to your vet as soon as possible. She may have respiratory tract or heart disease.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Call your doctor if your baby has:

Any cough, and they`re younger than 4 months. A dry cough related to a cold (a runny nose but no fever) that lasts more than five to seven days. A dry or wet cough with a cold and a fever of 100 degrees or more. Mild, light wheezing.

There should be no pauses longer than about 10 seconds between breaths. Pulling in of the ribs when taking a breath (retraction) Wheezing, grunting, or whistling sounds while breathing. Odor, drainage, or bleeding from the umbilical cord.
Newborn sneezing and coughing are quite normal, as these are common reflexes. Sneezing is typically nothing to worry about, but coughing could be a sign of the common cold. Contact your healthcare provider if your baby spikes a fever or symptoms don`t subside.
Sneezing in newborns is normal. Even if it seems excessive to you, it`s probably normal since babies tend to sneeze more than adults. However, if your baby is showing other symptoms like a runny nose or fever, they might be sick. Talk to your doctor if you think your baby might have a cold or other infection.
The baby is well-protected in the uterus, and even a hard sneeze will not affect the baby. The only time that sneezing may be problematic for the baby is if the sneezing is the symptom of an underlying illness or problem.
Immediate action required: Call 999 or go to A&E immediately if: You have severe difficulty breathing or you have sudden shortness of breath and: your chest feels tight or heavy. you have pain that spreads to your arms, back, neck and jaw.
Clap (percuss) your child`s chest or back with your cupped hand. This loosens mucus and helps it move. Be sure the area is covered with thin clothing or a cloth.
Grunting. Flaring of the nostrils with each breath. Bluish tone to a baby`s skin and lips. Pulling inward of the muscles between the ribs when breathing.
Baby cough with no other signs of illness

Why: A cough that has persisted for a week or more without any other signs of illness (like runny nose, fever, or lethargy) or allergies (clear discharge) could mean that your child has something stuck in his throat or lungs.

Coughs caused by colds due to viruses can last weeks, especially if a child has one cold right after another. Asthma, allergies, or a chronic infection in the sinuses or airways also might cause lasting coughs. If your child still has a cough after 3 weeks, call your doctor.
If your baby has a cold with no complications, it should resolve within 10 to 14 days. Most colds are simply a nuisance. But it`s important to take your baby`s signs and symptoms seriously. If symptoms don`t improve or if they worsen, it`s time to talk to your doctor.
It`s normal for your baby to sneeze often. Because the hair inside his nose hasn`t grown enough, he may sneeze up to 12 times a day to eliminate secretions that interfere with his breathing.
Can coughing while pregnant hurt the baby? Dr. Lev: While routine colds and mild coughing while pregnant will not hurt your baby, more severe coughing, from pneumonia for example, could exacerbate labor in people who are already at risk of preterm labor. If your coughing is severe, talk to your doctor.
Cold air or activity can make these coughs worse, and they often subside at night or when the child is resting. You should make sure that nothing in your house, like air freshener, pets, or smoke, is making your child cough.
The good news is that while it may be annoying, coughing alone won`t hurt baby, says Kjersti Aagaard, MD, a professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children`s Hospital. And, no, it won`t cause you to go into labor either.
Wet lung, or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), refers to respiratory failure, usually accompanied by sudden shortness of breath, low blood oxygen levels, and fluid in the lungs.
“Wet lung” is a casual term for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). This condition occurs when the lungs are filled with fluid instead of air. The fluid in wet lung could be pus from infection, fluid backed up in the lungs from heart disease, or blood from either lung or heart disease.
Shortness of breath has many causes. Sometimes conditions such as anxiety can lead to shortness of breath. Some children get mild shortness of breath when they exercise. Trouble breathing also can be a symptom of a serious problem, such as asthma, lung disease, heart problems, and pneumonia.
A problem with your lungs or airways

This means your airways have narrowed and you`ll produce more phlegm (sticky mucus), which causes you to wheeze and cough. You`ll feel breathless because it`s difficult to move air in and out of your airways.

Bronchitis symptoms

Coughing is the main symptom of bronchitis. Your child`s cough might sound dry, or it might produce mucus. Your child might also have a runny nose, sore throat or fever. And your child might be short of breath and have some wheezing.

This form of pneumonia is usually mild and feels like a chest cold, but it can get worse. The symptoms of cough, headache, and a low fever start slowly. The infection is usually so mild that your child may walk around with it without knowing they have it. Most children don`t get sick enough to be in the hospital.
If your child is one year old or older, give them warm apple juice, milk or decaffeinated tea with honey in it. The warm liquid can soothe their throat and loosen the mucus. Help clear their chests with a cool mist humidifier or steamy shower.
A bronchitis cough sounds like a rattle with a wheezing or whistling sound. As your condition progresses, you will first have a dry cough that can then progress towards coughing up white mucus.
If you have pneumonia, your lungs may make crackling, bubbling, and rumbling sounds when you inhale.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My baby has always had a cough and sneezing . Shes 9 now and it seems worse lately, she is having a hard time breathing, its like a person with allery
ANSWER : A. If she has breathing difficulties then you should take her to your vet as soon as possible. She may have respiratory tract or heart disease.

Q. My C. K. Charles has an asmathic cough. Ok most of the day, but worse in hotter rooms in the evening. What’s wrong?
ANSWER : A. Coughing in dogs can be caused by a number of things including allergies, asthma, illness such as Bordetella (kennel cough) or even lung and heart problems.

Allergies and asthma can cause a dog to have a raspy cough, and they may wheeze, sneeze or have running noses or trouble breathing when active or in an area where the allergen is present. Your vet can determine if an allergy or asthma is present and provide medication as needed to help with symptoms.

Bordetella can also cause a deep hacking cough, and is common in dogs that frequent doggy day cares, kennels or dog parks. The causes can be bacterial or viral, and treatment depends on if any secondary symptoms such as fever or dehydration is present. Treatment involves cough suppressants from your vet, or even antibiotics and fluids to treat secondary illnesses. Other illnesses such as heartworm may cause a chronic cough and exercise intolerance and should be looked for if your dog is not already on a heartworm preventive.

Small dogs are also prone to a condition called collapsing tracheas, and Cavaliers are very prone as a breed to heart and lung issues. Collapsing tracheae often cause a gasping or hacking cough when excited or active, and may require treatment if they become problematic. Heart and lung problems such as heart failure or genetic abnormalities can also cause coughing as a sign of the illness. Your vet can perform a complete exam to check the health of the lungs and heart.

Q. My new puppy is coughing a lot and I think it is Kennel Cough. Could it be?
ANSWER : A. Kennel Cough is similar to the human cold, and it can be caused by three categories of microorganisms.

1. Bordetella Bronchiseptica: A small bacteria which can result in bronchitis and severe cough in dogs.
2. Canine Adenovirus: A serious and contagious virus.
3. Canine Influenza Virus: An extremely contagious virus causing mild to severe respiratory symptoms in dogs.
Kennel Cough has its own course of 1 to 3 weeks and can be managed medically.

Close environments with several dogs can increase the chance of dogs catching the cough. Kennel Cough vaccination is aimed mostly at preventing the Bordetella infection through an inhalant or injection vaccination. Although not 100% effective, it should be recommended in all dogs that spend time around other dogs, even the park is considered one of these social occasions.

Kennels have their own policy with regards to Kennel Cough vaccinations and should always be contacted well ahead to understand and comply with their requirements before the stay of your dog.
If you suspect that your dog has caught Kennel Cough, you should see your veterinarian. Your dog might benefit from certain medications to speed up his recovery. These might include antibiotics, anti-inflammatory drugs, and cough suppressants at your vet’s discretion.

Q. How can I keep my 14 year old Yorkie from snapping at the younger ones?
ANSWER : A. It’s all about management. Do not allow the 7yo’s to interact with your 14yo unsupervised. You should be there each time they interact so you can redirect the 14yo’s attention onto some toys, or onto some treats when the 7yo’s are around. It sounds like you need to help your 14yo make positive associations with being around the younger pups. You should be trying to feed him treats each time he interacts with them, and doesn’t snap at them. Pet and praise him each time he is around them, or any time they are near. As I said, keep the separated when you cannot supervise their interactions because if you aren’t around when he is snapping at them, you could end up with a fight on your hands.

It could also be that they spend too much time together. Imagine spending 100% of your time with somebody, day in and out, doing everything together… including going to the bathroom.. that might bother anybody. I think you should give them more time apart from each other. Take them all on separate walks, separate them to play with them individually, separate them when you take them to potty, separate feeding times in separate rooms, etc. This can help alleviate the stress your older dog is feeling due to living closely with other dogs. You should always be giving individual activities in a houseful of dogs anyway.. when you expect them to get along 100% of the time, that’s when you find trouble.

Q. Rescued a dog almost two weeks ago, and now that her kennel cough is gone her personality shines!! No previous training, how should I start?
ANSWER : A. POST FOUR:

After your dog is familiar with the behavior you lured from scratch, and taught to your dog, you can start to use the “no-reward marker” I talked about. What you do is ask the dog to perform the behavior, and if the dog does not perform the behavior, you simply say your no-reward marker (choose one: eh-eh, hey, uh-oh, oops) show them the treat, put it behind your back, and BRIEFLY ignore your dog. Just turn your back for a second or two, before turning back to your dog and saying, “let’s try that again.” When you’re ready to start over with your dog, make sure you move around. If you are repeating the same cue while in the same position, while your dog is in the same position, you are likely to receive the same results. The more you move around, and start fresh, the better your chances are of having your dog listen to your cue the second time around. BIG rewards when they dog it successfully! Lots of praise and treats.

My no-reward marker is “hey.” When my dog does something wrong I say, “hey” and she immediately understands that she needs to offer a different behavior. This is clear to her. I don’t have to say it in a mean way, I simply say, “hey” in a normal tone of voice and she understands what the word means.

Once you’ve built up that connection and communication with your new dog, you can work on all kinds of fun behaviors! I personally enjoy the more zen-like behaviors: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ruy9UMcuGh8

I like to teach my dog fun tricks that offer her a “job” to do of sorts like object retrieval: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I4iertZSva8

(object retrieval training completed; what it looks like: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jx0Dml28FGY)

Scent-games are fun too! Very confidence building. Hide a REALLY smelly treat in a box, and place that box in a line of boxes. Let your dog go in the room while saying something like “search!” or “find it!” and watch them hunt for that smelly treat! Lots of rewards when they find it!

Q. I just adopted two dogs they have not been in kennels or shelters. Cleared by vet been sneezing coughing loosing breath sounds like asthm
ANSWER : A. It is very uncommon for dogs, especially two dogs who live together to develop asthma. They can however have asthma-like symptoms and this can be caused by aerosolized irritants (i.e. hairsprays, house detergents, painting supplies, etc).
I would investigate and look for causes of irritation in the home. If they are found remove them and I would recommend placing each pet in a small room with an air purifier/humidifier to help clear the airway for about 30 mins- 1 hr for a couple times a day.

If there are no irritants to speak of, then it sounds like a follow-up visit with the vet is needed to further investigate other possibilities (possible re-check lung sounds and/or chest x-rays) of why your pets are still symptomatic and what appropriate treatment is needed to help them get better.

Also just to note that pets don’t have to be kenneled or sheltered to catch kennel cough, they just need any close contact with other pets (such as pet-stores, dog parts, walks in the neighborhood). Kennel cough is highly contagious and is treated successfully in most cases with antibiotics, I like to use Doxycyline or Clavamox.

Q. My dog keep hacking like a cough or something in her throat, what can I do?
ANSWER : A. Hacking and coughing can be caused by a number of things ranging from foreign bodies such as twigs stuck in the mouth or throat, to infections or illnesses such as Bordetella or Kennel cough, common in dogs that frequent kennels, dog daycare or dog parks. In older dogs, heart and lung issues can also be indicated by a cough that does not go away.

If you think there may be a foreign object stuck in your dog’s throat, you can sweep a finger gently through the back of the mouth or throat if your dog will let you. If something feels stuck and is not easily moved by the finger, it is best to contact your vet to have the object safely removed. This usually requires sedation so that your dog does not become panicked or move, causing the object to become further stuck or cut the throat.

If your dog is showing other symptoms of illness in addition to the cough such as runny nose or eyes, fever, lethargy or changes in appetite, it may indicate a viral or bacterial illness such as kennel cough. These are usually treated with a cough medication in severe cases, plus rest and treatment of any additional symptoms until the condition improves. In bacterial causes, antibiotics may also be given to help your dog feel better.

If your dog has a constant cough that does not go away, or has had changes in ability to exercise, breathing, or appears to have swelling around the chest or abdomen, in may indicate a lung or heart issue. Your vet can thoroughly examine your dog for any signs of heart or lung problems and can then offer care as needed depending on the cause.

Q. My cat is having coughing episodes like hes trying to get up a fur ball and his chest is heaving with every breath he takes between coughing episodes
ANSWER : A. I’m pretty concerning about your cat. While coughing can be the sign of mild respiratory infection, the fact that his chest is heaving between coughing episodes suggests more serious disease. Coughing is from the respiratory tract and bringing up a hairball is a GI thing (vomiting). Sorry not trying to state the obvious but lots of people think their cat is vomiting when it’s actually trying to cough.

It sounds like from your description that your cat is in respiratory distress. This could be due to a number of problems that can be quite serious – asthma or heart disease, as a couple of examples. I think it’s important that you get him assessed by a vet ASAP in order to determine what’s going on.