Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Cats often eat grass. It isn’t particularly good for them and it does generally make them vomit. It could be eating it because it feels a bit sick already, maybe it isn’t getting all the nutrients it needs in its diet or it could be behavioural.

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“It would be concerning if your cat was vomiting every time it ate grass,” she says. “If it`s once a week or more frequently, then it should be checked by your vet. But if your cat eats grass and doesn`t vomit then it isn`t an issue.”
Because they lack the proper enzymes to digest it, cats who eat grass will then vomit that grass, along with the hair and/or other indigestible items.
The fiber found in grass supports digestion and can help relieve constipation. Anxious or stressed cats may find that chomping on grass helps calm their nerves. A bit like chewing gum for felines. Cats may eat grass as a source of vitamins and minerals, such as folic acid (B9), that they may not be getting elsewhere.
It can also be a problem if the cat has non-productive retching or is trying to vomit but nothing comes up. This could be a sign of an obstruction. Cats that have a sudden change in the frequency of their vomiting episodes should also be seen by a veterinarian.
Grass Relieves Upset Stomach in Cats

In the process of throwing up the grass, your cat will likely clear their stomach of other things like fur, feathers, parasites or bones, which can irritate the digestive tract or even cause more serious problems.

In some cases, if a cat eats too much grass, it can get stuck in the stomach and require surgery to remove. A visit to the vet will help identify any underlying conditions that could be causing your cat to eat grass. Some cats may also enjoy the taste of dog food–we asked experts if that`s safe.
There is no set rule for how much cat grass you should give your cat. Cat grass is safe for them to eat and has lots of benefits, but like everything else they should eat it in moderation so no more than 10% of their diet. If you`re growing it yourself try planting a handful of seeds at a time.
Pink vomit: This could be blood in trace amounts which you should definitely talk to your vet about. It could also be salmon-colored food if it has a smoothie-like consistency. Green vomit: In addition to bile or partially digested food, this may be digested plant matter.
Good for them! Grass benefits even well-fed cats. Grass provides roughage that aids digestion and elimination. Cats that eat grass routinely may have more regular gastrointestinal tracts, fewer hair balls, and less constipation.
Cats do a lot of weird things. One of the biggies is eating grass, often to throw it up just a few minutes later.
If your cat is vomiting periodically or infrequently, avoid giving them any food for approximately 12 hours. Provide your kitty with a couple of tablespoons of water every 30 minutes or give them ice cubes throughout their time of fasting.
Did you know that your indoor cat can develop intestinal parasites? The risk of gastrointestinal parasites in cats increases if you let your cat sit on a patio, deck, porch, or spend a few minutes enjoying some time in the grass.
White rice in their regular cat food. Canned pumpkin or pumpkin treats for the fiber (Nummy Tum-Tum is a great pumpkin-based treat for cats) Bland food (Hill`s Prescription Diet i/d Digestive Care Cat Food) Probiotics labeled for cats (Purina Pro Plan Veterinary Diets Fortiflora Probiotic)
Gastrointestinal problems. It`s possible that your cat`s eating grass to help with digestion issues. That`s because grass can act as a laxative or induce vomiting when he eats it.
So how do you spot an intestinal blockage in your cat? Common symptoms include diarrhea, vomiting, refusing to eat, weakness and lethargy, abdominal pain or swelling, cold body temperature, crying and even an unwillingness to lie down, among other issues.
How to Protect Your Cat from Toxoplasmosis. This reduces the chance they will eat infected animals, eat contaminated grass, or dig in contaminated soil. Uncooked meat can be a source of infection. Commercial dry and canned foods have a lower risk of contamination.
In the wild, cats chew on bones and grass to help remove plaque from their teeth (among other reasons). This provides an excellent excuse to leave at least part of the lawn unmown! A small patch of grass for a cat to graze on will be greatly appreciated.
While catnip is a member of the mint family, cat grass is generally a combination of various types of grasses, rye, oat, barley or wheat grass that can be grown indoors. While both have health benefits for cats, they`re very different types of plants.
In most cases, cats will purr when they are in a relaxed environment, sending out waves of calmness. This may also occur when you stroke them, and if this is the case, your feline friend is feeling happy or sociable. However, cats purr to communicate other emotions and needs, too.
Some of the grass is swallowed and passes through the digestive system but as cats attempt to swallow a long grass blade, sometimes they become stuck in the throat. As the cat gags, the grass blade catches in the back of the throat and ends up caught behind the soft palate.
The most likely reason a kitten will be eaten is that it was born unhealthy or stillborn. The cat may eat the kittens for any other reason but they are more common in feral cats living in the wild without food or shelter. If your cat eats its kittens, worry not, it`s nature adjusting itself.
The cat`s meow is her way of communicating with people. Cats meow for many reasons—to say hello, to ask for things, and to tell us when something`s wrong. Meowing is an interesting vocalization in that adult cats don`t actually meow at each other, just at people.
They want to feel secure

Cats are vulnerable when sleeping, so this behavior suggests that they trust you and feel secure when you`re there. This behavior can also be traced back to kittenhood when litters would pillow on each other and on their mothers as they sleep.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Why does my dog eat grass?
ANSWER : A. As another user mentioned, dogs can eat grass when they want to vomit. Sometimes, when a dog has an upset tummy, they will eat grass. If you notice your dog eating grass frantically, you can assume vomiting will shortly follow. Grass does not digest and pass normally. If your dog eats too much grass, it can cause serious issues with pooping. Your dogs poop can end up all tangled inside of her, and it can need veterinary assistance to remove it. The same goes for celery, so avoid feeding celery to your dog.

The other day my boyfriend accidentally left the laundry room door open where we were keeping the trash that was filled with cooked chicken bones. She ate one of the chicken bones lightning fast. We had to induce vomiting by feeding her some hydrogen peroxide. After we had fed her the peroxide, she immediately began frantically eating grass because her tummy was upset.

If there is something lacking in your dogs diet, it could be that your dog is eating grass to make up for it. I am sure that my dogs diet is extremely well balanced (I do not only feed her an air-dried raw food-type diet (Ziwipeak), but a wide variety of safe, healthy foods), so when she eats grass, I know that it is because she has an upset tummy.

That is why I think it is important making sure your dog has a very well balanced diet. If your dog is on a low quality kibble, your dog may be trying to let you know by eating grass (or eating poop).

Q. Why do dogs eat grass?
ANSWER : A. Some pet parents get concerned when they see their favorite canine nibbling on grass in the yard. They wonder whether it is because hunger, boredom or an indication of an underlying illness. Often the consumption of grass will result in vomiting because it irritates the stomach and gastrointestinal tract. This is an extremely common problem for dog parents. There is no one reason for why dogs exhibit these behaviors and it is very much dependent on each dog. Here are some of the reasons why our dogs choose to eat grass:

1. Nutritional Issues

Historically speaking, dogs are considered omnivores, which mean they consume a variety of both meat and plant-based food. There is some indication that dogs with a low fiber diet may choose to scavenge in the grass to fulfill this nutritional deficiency. These dogs may also find that grass has an appealing flavor and consistency. If you feel that this may be the reason for your beloved canine consuming grass then consider discussing with your veterinarian on how to incorporate more fiber into your dog’s diet.

2. Boredom

Many dogs who are not receiving adequate exercise will be become bored and search out activities to occupy their time, including eating grass. Evaluate how much exercise your dog is getting on a daily basis and consider more walks or other fun activities, such as playing fetch or tug of war.

3. Upset Stomach

There is a belief that dogs with an upset or gassy stomach will self-medicate by consuming grass. Vomiting often follows this grass eating activity eliminating the contents of the stomach or changing the gas distension within the gastrointestinal tract. However, there is not much scientific evidence to back up this theory. If you are concerned about too much gastric acid in your dog’s stomach or any other underlying medical issue that could be the reason for their grass eating, consult with your veterinarian.

Overall, grass eating is usually not toxic to your dogs unless your lawn contains chemicals, including pesticides or herbicides. Monitor your dog’s behavior along with his diet and exercise to determine if there is a reason for the inappropriate grass snacking.

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. Cat was vomiting for a few days. Took to vet, received anti-nausea medicine 2 days ago. Drinks and no longer vomits, but won’t eat. I’m worried
ANSWER : A. If your cat has been feeling nauseated, it is possible that the nausea, or just general illness is making him want to eat less. However, you can try enticing him to eat with a few tricks geared to cats.

Warming up wet foods or even bland people foods such as plain chicken or boiled hamburger can make food more interesting to cats. Cats tend to go for aromatic rather than flavorful foods, so making the food as “smelly” as possible may encourage your cat to take a bite. Bland foods are also good for helping to soothe upset stomachs, which may still be happening if your cat had recently had a vomiting episode.

However, if enticing your cat to eat does not work, or he continues to refuse to eat any food, it is best to contact your local veterinarian for more care and testing. Cats can become very ill if they refuse to eat for more than a few days, and finding the underlying cause can help your cat feel better.

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

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Q. Why does my dog eat grass? He throws up afterwards!
ANSWER : A. There is much debate over why dogs eat grass and then vomit afterwards. One theory is that the dog may have an upset stomach, and so eats the grass blades which then irritate the digestive system and causing vomiting to happen. Another theory is that the dogs are eating grass to mimic a “lost nutrient” of their ancestors found usually by hunting and then eating the contents of the stomachs of herbivores. A third theory is that dogs just do it because to them, it’s fun and they can.

If your dog has been vomiting a lot recently, either related to or unrelated to eating grass, then it is always a good idea to schedule a wellness exam with your vet to make sure there are not any issues causing illness. Grass, especially in areas where livestock may graze can also be a host for parasite eggs, which can in turn infect your dog with an internal parasite (and thus cause vomiting and diarrhea).

If your dog is not eating at all, this is more concerning and points further to some digestive upset causing his or her symptoms. Making an appointment with your vet as well as bringing in a sample of his or her stool is best for helping your pet feel better.

Q. How should I interpret my cat’s tail movements?
ANSWER : A. Our feline friends express themselves in many different ways, including through the use of their tails. Most pet owners pay close attention to a happy or excited dog, but they are sometimes less attentive to the posture and movement of their cat. Here are some of the most common cat tail behaviors, and the underlying emotion behind each action:

A flicking tail: Many anxious, nervous or stressed cats will hold their tail in a low position and flick it quickly back and forth. This is often referred to as angry tail, and a pet owner or veterinarian should be on guard for any possible aggressive or defensive activity. If a cat is moving their tail slowly, and not exhibiting the flicking motion, then this cat is at a much calmer state.

Vertical position: Most of the time when a cat is holding their tail in a straight, vertical position this is indicating curiosity and a playful mood. A cat chasing after a laser pointer or playing toys will often have their tails in a vertical position showing their enjoyment. This position also helps with balanced movements. In contrast, if the tail is in the vertical position and the cat’s back is arched with pinned back ears then this could demonstrate a feeling of being threatened and thus result in defensive or aggressive behaviors.

The Tucked Tail: Similar to a dog, a tucked tail often indicates submission or fear. Your cat is conveying upset feelings and should most likely be left alone. This tucked tail appearance can also make a cat look smaller and less threatening to an aggressive cat.

The Tail Twine: Cats will often hook their tail around another cat’s tail, owner’s legs or other objects to show a friendly and affectionate nature. They are also trying to indicate whether they want to receive affection from their owners, be fed or have playtime.

The next time you are home with your feline companion take note on how they express themselves through their tail movements, their ears, body posture and vocalization. You can start to better understand their needs and wants, in addition to what makes them uncomfortable or happy. Cats will surprise you with their array of emotions and varied expressions they can express.

Q. My. Dog seems to be eating grass and throwing up is it true dogs eat grass To settle their stomach
ANSWER : A. If the dog pukes after he has eaten grass, then he ate the grass too late to help settle his tummy. Yes, they do use grass to settle their tummies.. it’s sort of like us eating lots of fiber. If he is throwing up every meal, AND throwing up water.. you may need to bring him to the vet. If he just throws up once or twice, I wouldn’t worry too much about it as long as he is drinking water and keeping it down.