ie shot?

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. It maybe that she has just been in a fight but I would take her to see your vet for a check up and to confirm that there isn’t any damage or scratches to the eye.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

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Rabies Vaccine Side Effects

In rare cases, pets may have alopecia (hair loss) and/or thickened skin at the site of vaccination. Some pets will require medication to improve the area, whereas other pets will improve with time. In some dogs, this reaction can happen with all future rabies vaccines given.

Cat Reaction to Rabies Vaccine

Side effects are rare and typically include only slight fever, lethargy, decreased appetite, and/or a localized swelling at the vaccine site. In some excessively rare cases, a cat can have an allergic reaction to the vaccine, leading to hives, extreme weakness, and unexplained collapse.

Symptoms tend to progress quickly to weakness or paralysis of the legs, seizures, difficulty breathing, hypersalivation (too much saliva) due to difficulty swallowing, and abnormal behavior. Changes in behavior can range from extreme aggression to extreme depression or coma.
Endocrine diseases such as hypothyroidism (low thyroid hormone), Cushing`s disease (high cortisol), or reactions to rabies and corticosteroid injections can also cause alopecia.
Soreness, redness, swelling, or itching at the site of the injection, and headache, nausea, abdominal pain, muscle aches, or dizziness can happen after rabies vaccine. Hives, pain in the joints, or fever sometimes happen after booster doses.
Steroid injections can sometimes induce hair loss (telogen effluvium) in some individuals. It`s not common but some individuals actually develop small circles of hair loss around the areas injected. Some will even develop small `indentations` in the skin in these areas as well.
Your cat may not show any immediate signs or symptoms if it has been exposed to the rabies virus. The incubation period of rabies in cats is usually 3 to 8 weeks long, but it can last anywhere from ten days to a year. The time it takes for symptoms to appear is entirely dependent on the infection site.
In fact, rabies vaccinations are required by law in all felines. Kittens are generally vaccinated once around 4 months of age or within their first year of life. This vaccine is valid for 1 year after its first administration. After this, cats are eligible for a 1 year or a 3 year vaccine.
Rabies in cats is extremely rare. According to the CDC, domestic animals, including pets, accounted for only 7.6% of reported rabies cases in the U.S. in 2015, the last year for which statistics were available. There has not been a single confirmed case of cat-to-human rabies in the U.S. in the past 40 years.
Animals with rabies may show a variety of signs, including fearfulness, aggression, excessive drooling, difficulty swallowing, staggering, paralysis and seizures.
The virus can also be spread if saliva or tissue from the brain or spinal cord gets into broken skin or the mouth, nose or eyes. These are called rabies exposures. Rabies is not spread by petting the fur of a rabid animal. It is not spread by blood, urine, feces, or by touching dried saliva of a rabid animal.
Signs progress within days to cerebral dysfunction, cranial nerve dysfunction, ataxia, weakness, paralysis, seizures, difficulty breathing, difficulty swallowing, excessive salivation, abnormal behavior, aggression, and/or self-mutilation. What is rabies?
There is no time limit regarding the administration of PEP after an exposure. In this case it is still appropriate to initiate PEP. Administration of both human rabies immune globulin (HRIG) and four doses of rabies vaccine is recommended regardless of the time elapsed since the exposure.
Rabies is a preventable viral disease when treated with post-exposure prophylaxis vaccination. Some patients do not complete treatment and are at risk of rabies-related mortality.
Hair Loss. PRP injections can be effective in treating male pattern baldness, both in preventing hair loss and promoting new hair growth. PRP can also aid in the stimulation of hair growth after hair transplants.
Telogen effluvium is the most common form of drug-induced hair loss. It usually appears within 2 to 4 months after starting the drug. This condition causes the hair follicles to go into their resting phase (telogen) and fall out too early.
Rarely, unusual side effects such as respiratory difficulty, polyarthritis (seen as lameness), or cancer formation at sight of vaccination (see VAS below) are seen. Acute collapse or death has also been reported with numbers thought to be anywhere from 0.1 to 3 cats in 10,000 cats.
What breeds are susceptible to a vaccine reaction? One study found that Dachshunds, Pugs, Boston Terriers, Miniature Pinschers and Chihuahuas were more likely to experience reactions to vaccines than other breeds and is likely due to a genetic predisposition.
The cat`s meow is her way of communicating with people. Cats meow for many reasons—to say hello, to ask for things, and to tell us when something`s wrong. Meowing is an interesting vocalization in that adult cats don`t actually meow at each other, just at people.
In general we recommend that kittens receive a single dose of killed rabies vaccine at 12-16 weeks of age. Adult cats with unknown vaccination history should also receive a single dose of killed rabies vaccine.
How long can you live with rabies? You can live several weeks or months after being exposed to rabies without symptoms. Once symptoms start, rabies causes death within a few days.
Most adult cats that received the complete booster series of vaccines as kittens should be revaccinated one year later and then every one to three years based on a lifestyle risk assessment.
Depending on where you live, you may be obligated by law to vaccinate your cat, regardless of their age. This typically only applies to the rabies vaccine, as the disease is zoonotic, extremely dangerous, and can be transmitted from pets to humans.
The first symptoms of rabies may be similar to the flu, including weakness or discomfort, fever, or headache. There also may be discomfort, prickling, or an itching sensation at the site of the bite. These symptoms may last for days. Symptoms then progress to cerebral dysfunction, anxiety, confusion, and agitation.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

Read Full Q/A … : I found Pickle on

Q. My cat has a huge section of hair&skin missing right under the eye. She’s got her vision& is responding normal. Should I take her in for rabie shot?
ANSWER : A. It maybe that she has just been in a fight but I would take her to see your vet for a check up and to confirm that there isn’t any damage or scratches to the eye.

Read Full Q/A … : Flannery-O-Connor – Scribd

Q. I just adopted my cat, about 7 months old, and he has discharged, a greenish color, coming from his eyes. Was told it was stress but what else?
ANSWER : A. I would call the rescue and explain your concerns. I wouldn’t think green mucus coming from eyes means stress and maybe whoever told you that was trying to just brush off the symptoms has nothing to worry about. Rescues normally guarantee the health of their animals and should cover the cost of medical bills if you need to take the cat into the vet. Green color can mean infection. Is the cat sneezing? Could it be an upper respiratory infection? Try to explain to the rescue they need to take the animal into the vet. If they aren’t interested in helping please take the cat to the vet as soon as you can. Make sure to bring all records you have on the cat incase the doctor’s office see’s any mistakes or missing fecal tests/vaccinations they would like to do at a later date with the cat (If the cat is sick they would never give vaccinations the same day).

Read Full Q/A … : Eye Problems in Cats

Q. My cat started to pee outside the litter box. What should I do?
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate bathroom use in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his defecating outside the box.

Once medical issues are ruled out, it’s time to take a look at other explanations. Has there been a lot of activity that wasn’t normal? Were you away and your cat was left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox located in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet, or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Have you changed the brand of litter or kind? Or is there something about the spot he has chosen to use that is attracting him in some way? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out as a way of expressing their dissatisfaction.

The general rule of thumb is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped at least daily, if not more often and changed completely on a weekly basis, and washed with soap and water.

You can also offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystal kind, since it makes a hissing sound when wet that can startle some cats and make them reluctant to use it again.

The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litterbox. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation.

Q. My cat has wheezy breathing, his third eyelid is almost half closed, lots of the time his eyes look tearfilled, phlegm in back of throut he coughs up
ANSWER : A. Wheezing, hacking, and eye tearing in cats is often the result of a viral upper respiratory infection. Symptoms may include sneezing, eye or nasal discharge, nasal congestion, eye squinting, lethargy, and inappetence. Common causative agents include herpesvirus and calicivirus. An exam with your veterinarian is recommended to make sure that his vital signs are normal, including a normal temperature. If he’ll let you check his temperature at home, you can. I suggest lubricating a thermometer and checking his temperature rectally. A normal body temperature for cats will range between 100.5 to 102.5. If his temperature is 103 or higher you should consider bringing him in to your vet. Additionally, if you see yellow/green discharge from the eyes or nose, increased frequency of sneezing, lethargy, loss of appetite, or open-mouth breathing I suggest bringing him to your vet right away. Viral infections, just like in people, can weaken the immune system allowing bacterial infections to occur, which requires veterinary prescribed antibiotics. If there are any other cats in the house, I recommend temporarily isolating them from your sick cat until his signs resolve. Minimizing environmental stress is also recommended for his recovery. If you have any other concerns or are interested in additional information I’m happy to follow-up with an online consultation.

Q. How should I interpret my cat’s tail movements?
ANSWER : A. Our feline friends express themselves in many different ways, including through the use of their tails. Most pet owners pay close attention to a happy or excited dog, but they are sometimes less attentive to the posture and movement of their cat. Here are some of the most common cat tail behaviors, and the underlying emotion behind each action:

A flicking tail: Many anxious, nervous or stressed cats will hold their tail in a low position and flick it quickly back and forth. This is often referred to as angry tail, and a pet owner or veterinarian should be on guard for any possible aggressive or defensive activity. If a cat is moving their tail slowly, and not exhibiting the flicking motion, then this cat is at a much calmer state.

Vertical position: Most of the time when a cat is holding their tail in a straight, vertical position this is indicating curiosity and a playful mood. A cat chasing after a laser pointer or playing toys will often have their tails in a vertical position showing their enjoyment. This position also helps with balanced movements. In contrast, if the tail is in the vertical position and the cat’s back is arched with pinned back ears then this could demonstrate a feeling of being threatened and thus result in defensive or aggressive behaviors.

The Tucked Tail: Similar to a dog, a tucked tail often indicates submission or fear. Your cat is conveying upset feelings and should most likely be left alone. This tucked tail appearance can also make a cat look smaller and less threatening to an aggressive cat.

The Tail Twine: Cats will often hook their tail around another cat’s tail, owner’s legs or other objects to show a friendly and affectionate nature. They are also trying to indicate whether they want to receive affection from their owners, be fed or have playtime.

The next time you are home with your feline companion take note on how they express themselves through their tail movements, their ears, body posture and vocalization. You can start to better understand their needs and wants, in addition to what makes them uncomfortable or happy. Cats will surprise you with their array of emotions and varied expressions they can express.

Q. Our cat of six years has on two separate occasions has defecated on the living room rug and recently pee’d on the skirt of the Christmas tree.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his eliminating outside the box.

If medical issues are ruled out, take a look at other reasons. Has there been a lot of unusual activity? Has you cat been left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Is it big enough? Have you changed the type or brand of litter? Is there something attractive about the spot he uses? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out to express their dissatisfaction.

The general rule is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped daily, if not more often and changed completely weekly, washed with soap and water only. You can offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystals, it makes a hissing sound when wet that startles some cats and make them reluctant to use it again. The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure any other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litter box. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation. And, when cleaning up pet accidents, don’t use any cleaner containing ammonia. This leaves behind a scent similar to urine.