Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. I think what you are describing is likely to be normal in neutered cats, if you notice any change in consistency or size have your cat checked over.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Primordial pouch, also called the cat belly pooch, is excess skin and fat that hangs low on the rear part of a cat`s abdomen. This flap develops during adulthood and is more evident in certain breeds. This isn`t really a condition, rather just a normal part of their body.
Potential causes for a cat or kitten swollen belly include organ enlargement, fluid or a mass in their belly, intestinal parasites and weight gain. In some cases, your veterinarian might be able to identify the cause of your pet`s swollen belly through a physical exam alone.
So what is it? That bit of skin, fur and fat is a protective layer called the primordial pouch. It`s positioned along the length of a cat`s belly. These pouches are perfectly normal and healthy, said José Arce, president-elect of the American Veterinary Medical Association.
Bigger cats will have a primordial pouch, but the pouch is looser than fat and will sag lower, sway more, and could have fat deposits in an overweight cat. Age. As cats age, you`ll likely notice their primordial pouch becoming saggier—that`s normal.
A cat`s belly pouch is not a cause for concern in healthy cats because all cats have them. Primordial pouches are a normal part of all cat`s bodies. However, changes in the primordial pouch can indicate an underlying health concern. For example, lumps could alert you to a health issue.
A simple lipoma is a fatty lump that forms under the cat`s skin. Lipomas in cats are not very common but they can form on various parts of the body, typically in cats 10 years of age or older. While a cat may have one or more lipomas, they do not spread, they tend to not grow very large and they are not painful.
Primordial Pouch

It`s easily seen near the back legs. The pouch sways from side to side as the cat walks. The area feels like soft gelatin in a plastic baggie. It`s a natural part of the feline anatomy which all cats have although the size and appearance varies.

A hormonal imbalance is thought to play a central role in the development of a false pregnancy, or pseudopregnancy, in which a non-pregnant female cat shows such symptoms as lactation or nursing without producing kittens. The affected female cat shows these symptoms about a month or two after her estrus (heat) is over.
Note that the primordial pouch is moveable and elastic. It`s not attached to any underlying muscle. If your cat will let you touch him there – and he may not; please respect your cat`s personal preferences when it comes to petting – it should feel like a nearly-empty water balloon.
Your cat`s primordial pouch is perfectly normal and shouldn`t be removed, especially since it doesn`t cause any discomfort or health issues. “The biggest concern should be to make sure that your cat has an appropriate weight and is not obese,” Dr. Bustamante said.
Some cat breeds are known to have noticeable primordial pouches. The Pixie Bob, the Mau, and the Bengal are cat breeds for which a pouch comes standard. It`s actually a breed requirement. Plenty of other cats have one too, though.
It`s a primordial pouch, and all cats have one, although they can vary in size depending on your cat. A cat`s primordial pouch runs along their underside, usually saggiest near the hind legs.
A primordial pouch is the extra flap of skin that hangs underneath your cat`s belly. Regardless of male, female, neutered, spayed, or not, your cat will have one. The pouch is formed in one of the earliest stages of a cat`s development.
When held up under their front legs, their underbellies have an avocado or eggplant shape, says Hannah Shaw, founder of the non-profit Orphan Kitten Club. Healthy round bellies are soft and squishy too. However, a potbelly shape indicates a bloated belly. It may feel hard and stick out, similar to a pregnant belly.
Luckily, how to tell if a cat is pregnant usually comes down to a few common signs, such as: Noticeable weight gain in a few weeks (she`ll gain about 2 to 4 pounds in all) Swollen and pink nipples (called “pinking up,” this occurs around week three of pregnancy) Distended abdomen (noticeable around week five)
A lipoma is a noncancerous growth of fatty tissue cells. A lipoma can develop in almost any organ of the body although they are most commonly found in the subcutaneous layer just below the skin. A lipoma usually grows slowly and is a nonpainful mass that is soft and moveable under the skin.
A lipoma is a slow-growing, fatty lump that`s most often situated between your skin and the underlying muscle layer. A lipoma, which feels doughy and usually isn`t tender, moves readily with slight finger pressure. Lipomas are usually detected in middle age. Some people have more than one lipoma.
Fatty tumors, called lipomas, may show up anywhere on a cat`s body. They aren`t cancerous and don`t need to be removed unless they keep your cat from getting around well. They`re seen more often in older or overweight cats. To check a lump for cancer, your vet will use a needle to get a sample.
The buildup of large amounts of fluid in the abdomen may cause cats to develop noticeable symptoms, including the most common: Abdominal discomfort—cats resist abdomen examination or vocalize while lying down. Abdominal swelling.
Using body weight as a guide, cats are considered overweight when they weigh 10-20% above their ideal body weight. Cats are considered obese when they weigh more than 20% above their ideal body weight.
Symptoms of Abdominal Distension in Cats

Sudden or gradual visibly larger abdomen. Vomiting. Diarrhea. Flatulence.

Symptoms you might notice include: Enlarged mammary glands and nipples. Increased appetite and/or weight gain. Behavioral changes such as finding new places to sleep/nest, and changes in attitude such as becoming less affectionate and less active.
If your lady cat wanders outside the home and isn`t spayed, there`s a chance that their sagging belly is indicative of pregnancy. In a pregnant cat, the distended belly presents at around week five.
When going in for a kiss, the most important thing is to avoid kissing on the lips, for hygiene reasons. It`s best to avoid the stomach too as most cats don`t like having their tummy touched. Cats usually prefer brief interactions so if you do want a kiss, a quick peck is best.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

Read Full Q/A … : I found Pickle on

Q. My cats nose is stopped up on antibiotics. She has a loss of appetite, acting normal though. Is 3 ounces of can food enough in 24h? 9 pound cat
ANSWER : A. Cats with stopped up noses tend to eat much less, as you’ve noted, because they can’t smell their food as well. And the smell of food is pretty important to a cat’s appetite. You can start by warming up the food in a microwave – not too hot, test it yourself by putting your finger right in the center, as the temperature of microwave food can vary – as this will intensify the smell and hopefully make your cat more interested.

Saline nose drops, like those that are used on little kids, are safe to use on a cat to clean the discharge that is dried around and in the nose. There’s a brand called Little Noses that’s available in the U.S. That I like. You can put it on a q-tip and try to remove the debris. Humidifying the air with a humidifier can help as well, or you can put the cat in the bathroom and run the shower enough to generate steam. Don’t use “real” nose drops like Neo-synephrine or anything else like that – cats quickly build up resistance to them.

A 3 oz can of food is an OK amount in 24 hours, but do try the techniques above to help your cat get more interested in food. You might also try some baby food – no garlic or onions in the ingredients – as cats usually really like the taste of it.

Q. We have two female cats who are sisters. One was just diagnosed with generalized lymphoma. Is there risk of being contageous? What kind of food
ANSWER : A. Lymphoma is a cancer and not a bacteria or virus, so it cannot be spread from cat to cat via contact. However, if your cats are related, they may both be genetically predisposed to getting the same type of cancer. Feline lymphoma can also sometimes be caused by the Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) or Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) which CAN be spread from cat to cat. The spread of these viruses is usually through bite wounds, saliva or fecal and urine matter, and the chances of spread among two amicable cats is lower, however testing both cats is always good.

As lymphoma can cause a decrease in appetite, sometimes the best food is one that will keep your cat on her normal eating routine so that she keeps her weight and energy up. Enticing her to eat by warming up wet foods, or even moistening and warming dry foods may encourage continued normal eating and may prevent weight loss from loss of appetite. A high-fat, high protein and low carbohydrate diet (such as a grain-free diet) may also help by providing a more calorie and nutrient dense meal so that every bite is beneficial.

Q. How should I interpret my cat’s tail movements?
ANSWER : A. Our feline friends express themselves in many different ways, including through the use of their tails. Most pet owners pay close attention to a happy or excited dog, but they are sometimes less attentive to the posture and movement of their cat. Here are some of the most common cat tail behaviors, and the underlying emotion behind each action:

A flicking tail: Many anxious, nervous or stressed cats will hold their tail in a low position and flick it quickly back and forth. This is often referred to as angry tail, and a pet owner or veterinarian should be on guard for any possible aggressive or defensive activity. If a cat is moving their tail slowly, and not exhibiting the flicking motion, then this cat is at a much calmer state.

Vertical position: Most of the time when a cat is holding their tail in a straight, vertical position this is indicating curiosity and a playful mood. A cat chasing after a laser pointer or playing toys will often have their tails in a vertical position showing their enjoyment. This position also helps with balanced movements. In contrast, if the tail is in the vertical position and the cat’s back is arched with pinned back ears then this could demonstrate a feeling of being threatened and thus result in defensive or aggressive behaviors.

The Tucked Tail: Similar to a dog, a tucked tail often indicates submission or fear. Your cat is conveying upset feelings and should most likely be left alone. This tucked tail appearance can also make a cat look smaller and less threatening to an aggressive cat.

The Tail Twine: Cats will often hook their tail around another cat’s tail, owner’s legs or other objects to show a friendly and affectionate nature. They are also trying to indicate whether they want to receive affection from their owners, be fed or have playtime.

The next time you are home with your feline companion take note on how they express themselves through their tail movements, their ears, body posture and vocalization. You can start to better understand their needs and wants, in addition to what makes them uncomfortable or happy. Cats will surprise you with their array of emotions and varied expressions they can express.

Q. My cat is pooping outside of the litter bix. He is 2 1/2. He did this as a kitten. It stopped then started about 3 months ago. Litterbox is clean.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination or house soiling can be a frustrating problem but with a bit of detective work on your part, there is hope. First, before deciding that this is a behavioral issue, any medical problems (diarrhea, constipation, fecal incontinence, pain on defecation, etc.) need to be ruled out and/or treated. If your cat receives a clean bill of health from your vet but is still eliminating outside the litterbox, then we need to consider that something about the box itself might be aversive to your cat. Cats can be quite finicky about their litterbox and toileting habits. Below I have listed common recommendations and cat preferences for litterbox use. Review the list and make any changes that could account for your cat’s aversion to defecating in the litterbox:
* Soft, fine-grained clumping litter (vs, coarse-grained, non-clumping litter)
* Unscented
* 1 – 1 1/2 inch depth (especially older cats or cats with hip problems)
* Larger pans (especially for large cats) – want to get whole body inside – poop just outside the box might mean the box is too small
* Open, non-hooded
* At least one shallow side to get in and out easily
* Easy to get to – not hidden away, preferably in areas they spend time in or near – and not near appliances that make scary, unpredictable noises (washers, dryers, refrigerators)
* Scoop minimum 1X/day – preferably 2
* Clean the litterbox with soap and water and put in fresh scoopable litter at least once/month (instead of just continuously adding)
* Some cats prefer to urinate in one box and defecate in a separate box, so you may need 2 boxes even if you just have 1 cat. Multi-cat households should have 1 box/cat plus 1 extra.

Q. Would a male cat be affectionate to another male cat or would a female be more affectionate
ANSWER : A. The sex of the cats is less important than the personality of each cat. If the cat you have at home is already a strong-willed cat, another cat like that will lead to a lot of confrontations as they both try to be in charge and an older cat shouldn’t be matched with a rambunctious younger cat. If you keep in mind what your cat’s basic nature is, you’ll find a good match. I’ve always had multiple cats and rarely have a problem integrating a newcomer.

Q. I have a cat with that virur (aids) could u tell me about her disposition and care
ANSWER : A. Thanks for your question.

Unfortunately the discussion about what you asked has no straightforward answers and can be quite complex.

First thing that I would double check, considering that your cat is very young, is whether she is really infected. It is important to remember that kittens born to FIV-infected queens will receive antibodies from the queen via the milk, and so will test positive early in life though they may not be infected. Kittens with a positive test result should always be retested when they are 5-6 months of age.

Many FIV infected cats are able to live happily with the virus for a long period of time, and indeed the virus will not necessarily ever cause clinical disease.

Different factors will influence the onset of disease in your cat including:

– The ”subtype” of FIV your cat is infected with,

– Her immune response

– The presence or absence of other infectious agents.

To maintain a good quality of life for your cat, I will give you these general guidelines, but you will then find certainly helpful to speak with your veterinarian for specific cases.

– Some antiviral medications used in human patients with HIV infection have also been shown to help some cats with FIV infection. Interferons may have anti-viral effects and modify immune responses. A recombinant feline interferon (feline interferon omega) is available in some countries. Down side is the cost usually.

– Keep your cat away from other cats and possible source of infections;

– Maintain good quality nutrition;

– Keep your cat indoor if possible regularly checked by your veterinarian;

– Keep your cat away from non-infected cats.