Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. That’s fine until your vet opens. Water alone is better or very very dilute salt for eyes. Once your vet is open book an appointment as there may be something stuck in there, or possibly an infection or ulcer. All of which will require different treatments.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

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Natural treatment for eye infection

If you believe your dog or cat may have some eye irritation, try using a homemade saline solution made from 1/4 teaspoon of salt and 1 cup of lukewarm water. Drip the saline solution into your pet`s eye using a cotton ball or eye dropper 3 or 4 times a day.

As with people, a goopy or sticky discharge coming from your cat`s eyes is typically a sign of infection. A clear discharge often indicates a viral infection whereas green or yellow discharge suggests that your cat has a bacterial infection.
Dip a cotton ball in water. Wipe away the eye discharge, always from the corner of the eye outward. Use a fresh cotton ball for each eye. Steer clear of any over-the-counter drops or washes unless your vet has prescribed them.
If your cat looks at you with red, watery and scratchy eyes, it`s important to call your veterinarian right away. Never treat your cat with leftover antibiotics from a previous infection, as it may exacerbate the situation.
In most cases, he points out, conjunctivitis will self-resolve with no medication at all. However, he advises, owners should seek veterinary care if a cat has apparent eye discomfort and discharge to rule out more serious eye disorders.
Black tea contains theaflavins and thearubigins, which are thought to have antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory actions on the body. While not fully proven, these molecules have the potential to aid in mild cases of canine and feline conjunctivitis (a.k.a. pink eye).
What You Can Do. If your cat allows it, you can try to wipe the eyes clean of the discharge with a moistened cotton ball using a fresh cotton ball for each eye. Avoid using over the counter eye drops on your cat unless a veterinarian specifically instructs you to do so. Observe your cat for other symptoms of illness.
Some of the causes of increased tear production in cats include conjunctivitis (viral or bacterial), allergies, eye injuries, abnormal eyelashes (distichia or ectopic cilia), corneal ulcers, eye infections, anatomical abnormalities such as rolled in eyelids (entropion) or rolled out eyelids (ectropion), and glaucoma.
Gently wipe with a cotton wool ball dampened with clean water or a little baby oil. Use a separate ball for each eye and dry with a soft tissue. Great care should be taken not to touch the eyeball – this will be painful and your cat will try to avoid the experience next time.
If the eye infection is the primary health issue, your vet may recommend a topical treatment such as Terramycin® or Vetropolycin® for your cat`s eye. That said, if an underlying condition such as Calicivirus or FeLV is causing your cat`s eye condition, the underlying issue may be the focus of treatment.
The infection will usually clear up in 7 to 14 days without treatment and without any long-term consequences. However, in some cases, viral conjunctivitis can take 2 to 3 weeks or more to clear up. A doctor can prescribe antiviral medication to treat more serious forms of conjunctivitis.
Eye infections can be painful, irritating and sometimes even contagious to other cats. Cat eye infections can caused by: Viral infections. Upper respiratory infections (cat colds)
Cats with a viral or bacterial eye infection can sometimes spread it to their owners, so follow the same advice for dogs given above just to make sure you don`t catch whatever your kitty has.
Before reaching for the eye ointment, we try bathing the eye using a clean cotton wool pad and some cold tea. Yes, it sounds a bit strange, we make ourself a cuppa and pour some into a pot to bathe the cat`s eye, no milk in hers of course and be sure to let it cool first.
Moreover, the potent antimicrobial property of saltwater is beneficial in treating eye infections. Mix 1 teaspoon of salt in half a litre of cooled boiled water, dip a cotton swab and wipe your eyes from the corner end to your nose and discard swab away. Repeat this several times, until the eye irritation settles.
If you notice that one of your cat`s eyes is watering, this generally indicates that their eye is attempting to fight off some kind of threat to their health. This can range from a virus to a foreign object.
Whether you`ve got a dog or a cat, avoid using eye drops meant for humans to clear their eyes. If your pet gets something in her eye, it`s safe to use plain saline solution to rinse the eye out, but avoid any contact lens solution labeled as enzymatic or cleaning solution.
What eye changes may be present in a sick cat? Droopy eyelids, discharges that are green, yellow, or white, squinting, pupils that are dilated or constricted, or anisocoria (one pupil dilated and the other constricted are all signs that something is amiss.
The answer is simply: NO. Human wet wipes and baby wipes are not suitable for use on pets. In fact, Human wipes can be up to 200 times too acidic for your pet`s skin.
Vaseline short term is not going to do her any harm. It`s not something I`d use long term on any of mine though. I simply blot them dry with some kitchen roll if I see a wet eye, and so far, so good!
Conjunctivitis is usually not serious and will often go away by itself. You should still, however, see your doctor. If left untreated, chronic conjunctivitis can cause permanent eye damage. Treatment varies depending on what is causing the inflammation.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. I have a cat with that virur (aids) could u tell me about her disposition and care
ANSWER : A. Thanks for your question.

Unfortunately the discussion about what you asked has no straightforward answers and can be quite complex.

First thing that I would double check, considering that your cat is very young, is whether she is really infected. It is important to remember that kittens born to FIV-infected queens will receive antibodies from the queen via the milk, and so will test positive early in life though they may not be infected. Kittens with a positive test result should always be retested when they are 5-6 months of age.

Many FIV infected cats are able to live happily with the virus for a long period of time, and indeed the virus will not necessarily ever cause clinical disease.

Different factors will influence the onset of disease in your cat including:

– The ”subtype” of FIV your cat is infected with,

– Her immune response

– The presence or absence of other infectious agents.

To maintain a good quality of life for your cat, I will give you these general guidelines, but you will then find certainly helpful to speak with your veterinarian for specific cases.

– Some antiviral medications used in human patients with HIV infection have also been shown to help some cats with FIV infection. Interferons may have anti-viral effects and modify immune responses. A recombinant feline interferon (feline interferon omega) is available in some countries. Down side is the cost usually.

– Keep your cat away from other cats and possible source of infections;

– Maintain good quality nutrition;

– Keep your cat indoor if possible regularly checked by your veterinarian;

– Keep your cat away from non-infected cats.

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

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Q. My cat has a runny nose along with runny eyes. Should I worry?
ANSWER : A. Runny noses and eyes are common disorders in cats, and are usually a sign of an underlying condition. The most common one being an Upper Respiratory Infection.

This condition, also known as “cat flu”, is seen most often in kittens. It is caused by one of several viruses or bacteria and common symptoms include a runny nose, runny eyes, sneezing, wheezing and congestion.

In some cases, the discharge may change color to greenish or yellow, indicating a secondary infection. Cats that are in high stress environments or in contact with other cats are most likely to get URIs.

At home, be sure to keep your cat eating and drinking to prevent dehydration. You can also use a warm washcloth to remove any debris from the eyes or nose that is making seeing or breathing difficult.

Finally, keep in mind that if the symptoms continue for more than a day or two, the discharge becomes green or yellow, or your cat appears to be feverish or in distress, veterinary care should be sought without further delay.

Q. Weak, discharge from eyes, swelling on right eye, does not want to open eyes. What is wrong?
ANSWER : A. If the discharge from the eye is green or yellow in color, it can indicate a secondary infection. Swollen eyes can be caused by a number of things ranging from allergies to infections, to injury to the eye itself or surrounding areas.

It is best to have your pet’s eye examined by your local vet. They will most likely wish to place a stain in the eye that can check for damage such as cuts or scratches. An ointment can then be given to help reduce inflammation, pain and take care of infection.

Until you can get to the vet, be sure to not let your pet scratch or paw at their eye as this can make things worse. You can also use a warm wet washcloth to gently remove any debris and allow the eye to open some, providing relief. However, if symptoms worsen, or the swelling travels to the face, head or neck, it may indicate a serious allergic reaction which should be treated immediately.

Q. My cat has wheezy breathing, his third eyelid is almost half closed, lots of the time his eyes look tearfilled, phlegm in back of throut he coughs up
ANSWER : A. Wheezing, hacking, and eye tearing in cats is often the result of a viral upper respiratory infection. Symptoms may include sneezing, eye or nasal discharge, nasal congestion, eye squinting, lethargy, and inappetence. Common causative agents include herpesvirus and calicivirus. An exam with your veterinarian is recommended to make sure that his vital signs are normal, including a normal temperature. If he’ll let you check his temperature at home, you can. I suggest lubricating a thermometer and checking his temperature rectally. A normal body temperature for cats will range between 100.5 to 102.5. If his temperature is 103 or higher you should consider bringing him in to your vet. Additionally, if you see yellow/green discharge from the eyes or nose, increased frequency of sneezing, lethargy, loss of appetite, or open-mouth breathing I suggest bringing him to your vet right away. Viral infections, just like in people, can weaken the immune system allowing bacterial infections to occur, which requires veterinary prescribed antibiotics. If there are any other cats in the house, I recommend temporarily isolating them from your sick cat until his signs resolve. Minimizing environmental stress is also recommended for his recovery. If you have any other concerns or are interested in additional information I’m happy to follow-up with an online consultation.

Q. My cat has entropion of the eyes. Vet did surgery on both eyes, the right eye seems ok but the left eye is still running/mucus. Can I use Neosporin?
ANSWER : A. Do NOT use Neosporin on cats or dogs as this product can be toxic to pets if ingested. If the eye is still leaking or has green or yellow discharge it is best to contact your veterinarian. Green or yellow discharge can indicate that a secondary infection has formed and may require antibiotics or cat-safe ointments to help clear it up. In the meantime, you can use a warm wet washcloth to remove any excess debris from the eye very gently, allowing the eye to open and help with healing.

Q. My dog got into a fight with a cat. I think the cat scratch her eye. I clean it out with water. I have gentak can I put that in there?
ANSWER : A. It is best NOT to place anything in the eye unless specifically instructed to do so by your vet as it can cause more damage to the eye. As cat scratches and bites can easily become infected and the eye is a very sensitive area, it is best to schedule a veterinary appointment as soon as possible to have the eye examined. Your vet can place a fluorescent stain in the eye to check the extent of the damage and can then give you a pet-safe medication to place in it as needed to help it heal. Until you can get to the vet, it is best to keep the eye clean of debris and discharge with a warm wet washcloth, and to prevent your dog from scratching or clawing at the eye with the use of an Elizabethan (cone) collar.