the pain

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Fever and weight loss should not prevent from treating pain. Glaucoma, particularly acute form is a very painful condition. I would suggest you to go back to your vet and get pain relief medications for your cat if you suspect he is in pain.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Glaucoma is incurable, but some of the pain and clinical signs may be relieved by the use of eyedrops containing dorzolamide and/or timolol, which reduce intraocular pressure, and steroids, which treat inflammation, if inflammation has caused the glaucoma.
Glaucoma is a painful eye condition that can affect our feline friends as well as humans and other animals. Glaucoma in cats can strike suddenly and quickly lead to blindness if left untreated.
Subtle signs of pain or illness include hiding, becoming less affectionate than normal and reduced grooming. Other signs of glaucoma in cats can include partially closed eye, pawing at eyes, watery discharge, obvious swelling or bulging of the eyeball, bloodshot eye, cloudiness of eye, dilated pupil or blindness.
How Are Cats Linked to Glaucoma? Scientists at the University of California, Los Angeles have found that people diagnosed with glaucoma have a high level of “immunoglobulin E.” Immunoglobulin e. is a type of antibody that`s produced when you have an allergic reaction to cats and cockroaches.
There is no cure (yet) for glaucoma, but if it`s caught early, you can preserve your vision and prevent vision loss. Taking action to preserve your vision health is key.
Are there any potential side effects? Side effects include a stinging sensation upon application to the eye, or eye inflammation, characterized by eye redness, watery eyes, and light sensitivity. Other side effects may include dry eyes, runny nose, nausea, or vomiting.
Angle-Closure Glaucoma

The eye pain can be severe, and may cause headache, and even nausea or vomiting. In an acute angle-closure glaucoma attack, the eye pressure rises rapidly, causing pain, and also causes the cornea to become cloudy, thus patients also notice their vision has decreased.

Glaucoma is a condition that damages your eye`s optic nerve, and it gets worse over time. It`s often linked to a buildup of pressure inside your eye. Glaucoma tends to run in families.
Dilating eye drops and certain medicines may trigger an acute glaucoma attack. Closed-angle glaucoma is an emergency. If you have had acute glaucoma in one eye, you are at risk for it in the second eye. Your health care provider is likely to treat your second eye to prevent a first attack in that eye.
Topical Corticosteroid Drops & Ointment

Cat eye inflammation can often be soothed using Corticosteroid drops or ointment. This medication is typically used to treat conjunctivitis, episcleritis, scleritis, pannus, and eosinophilic keratitis.

Aqueous humor misdirection syndrome — Feline aqueous humor misdirection syndrome (FAHMS) is a rare form of glaucoma that typically affects cats between 11 and 13 years of age. The condition affects both eyes, and female cats are predisposed.
As a result of an immediate injury, traumatic glaucoma is most commonly caused by blunt trauma, which is an injury that doesn`t penetrate the eye, such as a blow to the head or an injury directly on the eye. The most common cause is from sports-related injuries, such as baseball or boxing.
There are actions that you can take to slow the progression of glaucoma. Eating a healthy diet and getting regular exercise can help. It also helps to reduce your intake of alcohol and caffeine. It is important to stay hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids.
Glaucoma is a slowly progressing problem. On an average, untreated Glaucoma takes around 10-15 years to advance from early damage to total blindness. With an IOP (Intraocular Pressure) of 21-25 mmHg it takes 15 yrs to progress, an IOP of 25-30 mmHg around seven years and pressure more than 30 mmHg takes three years.
Do not use any over-the-counter eye drops for your cat, unless it`s artificial tears,” Jones says. “Anything medicated can have a negative effect.” Holt adds that eye drops for dogs should also be avoided.
The most common treatment for glaucoma is prescription eye drops. They work by lowering the pressure in your eye and preventing damage to your optic nerve. These eye drops won`t cure glaucoma or reverse vision loss, but they can keep glaucoma from getting worse.
A Healthy Diet May Reduce Your Risk of Glaucoma. In addition to its impact on your overall health, a healthy diet may help reduce your risk of glaucoma. For example, a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and fish has been shown to help lower blood pressure, reducing the risk of glaucoma.
Family history of glaucoma. Certain medical conditions, such as diabetes, migraines, high blood pressure and sickle cell anemia. Corneas that are thin in the center. Extreme nearsightedness or farsightedness.
In addition to avoiding caffeine, saturated fats, trans fatty acids, and salt in your daily diet, glaucoma patients should also consider avoiding any foods they`re allergic to. Some of these lifestyle choices might be difficult to make, but they`re more than worth it when maintaining eye health.
Once vision loss related to optic nerve damage and glaucoma occurs, it can`t be reversed. Further vision loss can be slowed with treatment, however. In order to prevent glaucoma and vision loss related to glaucoma, there are some things you can do. Exercise regularly to promote healthy blood flow.
At this time, there is no cure for glaucoma. However, with early detection and regular treatment from an eye doctor, glaucoma can usually be successfully managed to allow people living with glaucoma to live a normal, active life.
Stage three occurs when there is a significant increase in eye pressure. At this stage, glaucoma is quite advanced. Stage four is characterized by damage to the optic nerve. This is a situation that will need to be corrected for the patient to continue functioning normally.
Older age is not only a risk factor for the diagnosis of glaucoma, but also for its progression. Overall, these studies show that the percentage of patients with glaucoma increases dramatically with age, especially in patients who are of Latino/Hispanic and African descent.
For people with advanced glaucoma, a type of surgery called trabeculectomy reduces pressure in the eye more effectively than eye drops. New research into the first treatment offered also found that surgery was likely to be more cost-effective than eye drops over the person`s lifetime.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. How do I determine how much my overweight pet should weigh?
ANSWER : A. There are many tools to determine overweight and obesity levels in pets. A new tool, morphometric measurements and body fat index, are available to accurately determine a pet’s ideal weight; this will allow an accurate determination of the amount of food a pet should receive to achieve weight loss. Feeding the correct amount will lead to greater weight loss success.

There are many weight loss food options to help pets reach their ideal weight. Your veterinarian can help make a ideal weight recommendation. Here are some tips to help your dog lose weight in a healthy and safe way:

1. Diet: Providing a healthy and well balanced diet is essential to your pet’s overall health. Finding the right food for your dog can be a challenging process. For those overweight animals many commercial dog companies offer weight loss diets, but it is important to evaluate food labels for adequate nutritional content.

You want to ensure you are not missing other essential vitamin or mineral content. Volume of food is also important and the amount of food that works for one breed of dog may not be the same for another breed of dog. Portion control as opposed to free-choice feeding can help your dog to drop a few unnecessary pounds.

There are also prescription weight loss foods designed by veterinary nutritionists, such as Hill’s r/d (http://bit.ly/1AoENSd). Some pet owners find that home cooking is the best option for helping to provide a well-balanced and realistic diet plan. There are websites such as balanceit.com that offers recipes to fit your dog’s specific needs. Consulting with your veterinarian or a veterinary nutritionist to find the appropriate diet is a great way to help your dog be as healthy as possible.

2. Exercise: Another great tactic for weight loss for your dog is exercise. Whether this is through running, walking or playing with a favorite toy all of these are wonderful types of exercise to help keep your dog at a lean and healthy weight.

For those pet owners with busy schedules utilizing professional dog walking services or playtime through dog daycare services is another option. It has been shown that those pet owners that exercise regularly with their pets generally live a healthier lifestyle.

3. Physical therapy: As animals age pet owners offer encounter their favorite canine having more difficulty walking and have a dwindling desire to play with toys. Physical therapy, specifically hydrotherapy is a wonderful way to help older and arthritic animals gain more mobility and lose weight. Hydrotherapy has been proven to have several therapeutic effects on the body including, muscle strengthening, relief of swelling, decreased joint pain, less stiffness in limbs, improved circulation, weight loss, and increased tissue healing to name a few. For more information on the benefits of hydrotherapy:
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4. Veterinary visit and blood work: Weight gain can also be related to underlying health concerns such as hypothyroidism or other endocrine disorders. Scheduling a veterinary evaluation and routine blood work can be another important component in increasing the longevity of your dog’s life. Conditions such as hypothyroidism that predispose dogs to gain weight can be treated with a daily medication to improve hormonal balance. If feel that your dog is unnecessarily overweight there can be an underlying health condition that needs to be addressed.

5. Healthy treats: Pet owners love the chance to reward their favorite canine companion with treats and most dogs jump at the chance to consume these delicious products. The problem is many treats, which can include commercial dog treats or table scrapes can add many unnecessary calories to your dog’s daily intake. Reading labels and making note of the calories in these treats is an important component of understanding your dog’s overall health. Treats should not exceed more than 10 percent of your pet’s daily calories. There are healthier treats that can be offered to your pet to keep calories lower yet provide a fuller sensation. A pet owner can add steamed or pureed vegetables, such as carrots, green beans or sweet potato to add more fiber and thus a fuller feeling for your dog.

Q. My cat has glaucoma but doctor is not treating it yet because he also has a fever, loss of weight and appetite. I think it’s all caused from the pain
ANSWER : A. Fever and weight loss should not prevent from treating pain. Glaucoma, particularly acute form is a very painful condition. I would suggest you to go back to your vet and get pain relief medications for your cat if you suspect he is in pain.

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. My pet shows weight loss and has a hard time walking, like he has lost strength in his legs and has no control to maintain balance. What’s wrong?
ANSWER : A. Loss of balance or inability to control the limbs can be caused by a wide range of problems and is usually cause for concern. Damage to the nerves or muscles can cause loss of balance, as well as neurological disease or some illnesses. Having your vet perform a complete examination is needed to determine the exact cause.

Weight loss can refer to the actual loss of fat and weight on your dog, or may also be due to the loss of muscle tone in the body. If there is a problem with one of the limbs, it may be that the weight loss you are seeing is actually loss of muscle in that area. Weight loss can again be caused by a wide range of problems from neurologic disease, illness, parasites or disease. Making an appointment with your vet is best.

Q. My 16 year old indoor cat has lost most of her body weight in the last couple of weeks. I think she may have worms. What do I do?
ANSWER : A. Weight loss can be a serious sign of many underlying conditions in older cats, most notably metabolic issues such as thyroid disease or organ dysfunction. If no worms are visible in her stool, bringing in a stool sample to check for them, or making a wellness exam to check for any other causes of the weight loss are best to help find why your cat is losing weight prior to just treating for worms.

If worms are present, then determining the type of worms they are is the next step. Worms generally cause digestive upset in cats such as vomiting or loose stools in addition to weight loss in large infections. The two most common types include roundworms (long spaghetti-like strands) and tapeworms (small rice grain segments). Roundworms can generally be cured with any over the counter wormer, however tapeworms need a wormer specific to them to be given. Tapeworms are also spread via contact with fleas, so starting a flea prevention treatment can help prevent further infections. Cleaning all bedding and the environment your cat is in will also help for any type of internal parasite infection.

Q. My cat is excessively scrstching herself., to the point she has sores. She is strictly an indoor cat. Did have flees been treated for 2 months
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. We have two female cats who are sisters. One was just diagnosed with generalized lymphoma. Is there risk of being contageous? What kind of food
ANSWER : A. Lymphoma is a cancer and not a bacteria or virus, so it cannot be spread from cat to cat via contact. However, if your cats are related, they may both be genetically predisposed to getting the same type of cancer. Feline lymphoma can also sometimes be caused by the Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) or Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) which CAN be spread from cat to cat. The spread of these viruses is usually through bite wounds, saliva or fecal and urine matter, and the chances of spread among two amicable cats is lower, however testing both cats is always good.

As lymphoma can cause a decrease in appetite, sometimes the best food is one that will keep your cat on her normal eating routine so that she keeps her weight and energy up. Enticing her to eat by warming up wet foods, or even moistening and warming dry foods may encourage continued normal eating and may prevent weight loss from loss of appetite. A high-fat, high protein and low carbohydrate diet (such as a grain-free diet) may also help by providing a more calorie and nutrient dense meal so that every bite is beneficial.

Q. My 12 year old cat is constantly grooming and scratching to the extent that she is pulling her hair out in spots. She is also losing weight.
ANSWER : A. Weight loss in older cats, especially when coupled with continued or increased appetite can indicate diabetes or hyperthyroidism. I recommend getting your cat in to see your vet as soon as possible for an exam and comprehensive labwork.

Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.