Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Vomiting and diarrhea is an indication of a gastrointestinal problem, either from an infection or irritation or from an internal issue such as kidney or liver disease. 3 days vomiting, especially combined with diarrhea would quickly result in dehydration and I recommend you get her assessed and treated as soon as possible. I would not recommend any home remedies and delaying treatment any longer

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

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Cats usually have healthy digestive systems, so you should speak to your vet if your cat is vomiting or has diarrhoea for longer than 24 hours or if these symptoms are accompanied by other symptoms like tiredness.
The Common Causes of Vomiting and Diarrhea

First, cats might have vomiting and diarrhea because they picked up a stomach bug from somewhere. This might be a viral or bacterial illness. Next, some cats end up vomiting because they ate something they shouldn`t have. Some cats are curious and end up eating non-food items.

Staining and soiling of the fur around the back end in longhaired breeds are often associated with diarrhea. It is important to remember that some variation in the consistency of stools occurs in healthy cats. If frequent liquid or semi-liquid stools persist for more than two days, you should consult your veterinarian.
Find Out What`s Causing Your Cat`s Diarrhea

Viruses. Bacteria. Parasites in the intestines, like Coccidia and intestinal worms. Conditions, like inflammatory bowel disease, colitis, pancreatic disease, cancer or hypothyroidism.

Your vet may prescribe anti-nausea medication, which can be administered orally or via injection. Additional medications, such as antacids, antibiotics, dewormers, probiotics, prokinetics or pain medication may be prescribed, depending on your cat`s needs.
“If a cat vomits frequently or is showing other signs of illness, such as lethargy, inappetence (a lack of appetite), drooling, hiding, diarrhea, or constipation, then the cat needs to be seen by a veterinarian,” Teller said.
Do not feed your cat for 24 hours. Whether your cat is vomiting, has diarrhea, or is experiencing both, try to withhold food for 24 hours. However, you should provide your cat with clean drinking water as described above.
There are six main categories when it comes to the cause of acute diarrhea in cats: Infectious (parasitic, protozoal, bacterial, fungal, or viral) Inflammatory (such as food allergies) Metabolic or endocrine (such as diabetes or hyperthyroidism)
Basic treatments often include intravenous fluids, medications to help stop the diarrhea (anti-diarrheal medications meant for cats), dewormers, medications to treat nausea, and possibly pain medications. There are also times basic treatments involve dietary changes.
Take your pet to the vet immediately if they are experiencing any of the signs listed below: Your pet is otherwise happy, but diarrhea continues more than 48 hours. Your pet acts sick along with having diarrhea, such as being lethargic, vomiting, or loss of appetite.
If the diarrhea persists for longer than a day or two and the cat is also showing systemic signs, such as poor appetite, lethargy, or vomiting, you should seek veterinary care as soon as possible.
Symptoms of Worm Infestation in Dogs and Cats

In most cases of parasite infestations, patients show similar symptoms, the most common of which is diarrhea or poor-quality stool. Depending on the severity of the infestation, blood may sometimes be passed with the stool.

Treatment may include intravenous fluids, antiemetics (anti-vomiting drugs) and stomach protectants. If a blockage is suspected then surgery may be discussed.
Withhold food and water for two hours. Oftentimes the stomach lining may be very irritated. Some cats will want to eat even though their stomach is irritated, and they will continue to vomit. Give the stomach time to rest for a few hours.
It depends on the cause of vomiting. Most cases of acute vomiting, when vomiting has been present for less than two to three days, resolve quickly with simple treatment, without the underlying cause being diagnosed. Severe or chronic vomiting is more serious.
Most cats will not have signs of infection; however, cats with major roundworm infections commonly show vomiting, weight loss, dull hair, and a potbellied appearance. The cat may cough if the roundworms move into the lungs. You may notice adult roundworms in your cat`s feces or vomit.
Regurgitation is a term used to describe the process of vomiting food that isn`t processed yet. It usually happens when a cat gobbles too much food. Once again, the solution is to feed several smaller meals throughout the day.
Stomach problems, such as nausea and diarrhea, are among the most common symptoms of stress and anxiety. One reason for this may be an imbalance in the gut microbiome due to fight-or-flight hormones. Anxiety is a normal bodily response to threat or danger.
Is Wet Food or Dry Food Better for Cats With Diarrhea? We prefer wet food as it`s lower in carbohydrates. This helps reduce digestive upset. If you want to feed your cat dry food, choose a lower carbohydrate option.
Is dry food better for cats with diarrhea? If wet food is too rich for your kitty, then switching over to dry food can absolutely help to alleviate the symptoms of diarrhea. However, wet food has a much higher moisture content than dry food, which helps to keep your cat hydrated.
You may see whole worms, parts of worms or worm eggs in your pet`s stool or vomit. Worms or eggs can also sometimes migrate to a cat`s anus, getting stuck in the fur. Change in coat: If your cat is infested with a parasite, their fur may appear dull, rumpled or clumped due to lack of nutrients or dehydration.
Roundworms look like spaghetti and can be found in vomit and/or poop. Tapeworms are long, flat, and segmented. Whole tapeworms can be found in poop or sticking out of the rectum. Most commonly, the tapeworm segments break apart and look like pieces of rice stuck on your cat`s rear end.
Overactive thyroid, food allergies, kidney failure, cancer, poisoning (from houseplants, rat poison, human medications, etc.), parasites and infectious disease, among other things, all can result in diarrhea. Obtain veterinary assistance if the cause isn`t apparent or it is an ongoing problem.
Rich or fatty foods can cause digestive stress for your cat. For example, turkey, ham or other meats rich in fat will result in diarrhea. Excessive fat intake can also cause a life-threatening inflammatory disease called pancreatitis.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

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Q. Cat was vomiting for a few days. Took to vet, received anti-nausea medicine 2 days ago. Drinks and no longer vomits, but won’t eat. I’m worried
ANSWER : A. If your cat has been feeling nauseated, it is possible that the nausea, or just general illness is making him want to eat less. However, you can try enticing him to eat with a few tricks geared to cats.

Warming up wet foods or even bland people foods such as plain chicken or boiled hamburger can make food more interesting to cats. Cats tend to go for aromatic rather than flavorful foods, so making the food as “smelly” as possible may encourage your cat to take a bite. Bland foods are also good for helping to soothe upset stomachs, which may still be happening if your cat had recently had a vomiting episode.

However, if enticing your cat to eat does not work, or he continues to refuse to eat any food, it is best to contact your local veterinarian for more care and testing. Cats can become very ill if they refuse to eat for more than a few days, and finding the underlying cause can help your cat feel better.

Q. My cat is pooping outside of the litter bix. He is 2 1/2. He did this as a kitten. It stopped then started about 3 months ago. Litterbox is clean.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination or house soiling can be a frustrating problem but with a bit of detective work on your part, there is hope. First, before deciding that this is a behavioral issue, any medical problems (diarrhea, constipation, fecal incontinence, pain on defecation, etc.) need to be ruled out and/or treated. If your cat receives a clean bill of health from your vet but is still eliminating outside the litterbox, then we need to consider that something about the box itself might be aversive to your cat. Cats can be quite finicky about their litterbox and toileting habits. Below I have listed common recommendations and cat preferences for litterbox use. Review the list and make any changes that could account for your cat’s aversion to defecating in the litterbox:
* Soft, fine-grained clumping litter (vs, coarse-grained, non-clumping litter)
* Unscented
* 1 – 1 1/2 inch depth (especially older cats or cats with hip problems)
* Larger pans (especially for large cats) – want to get whole body inside – poop just outside the box might mean the box is too small
* Open, non-hooded
* At least one shallow side to get in and out easily
* Easy to get to – not hidden away, preferably in areas they spend time in or near – and not near appliances that make scary, unpredictable noises (washers, dryers, refrigerators)
* Scoop minimum 1X/day – preferably 2
* Clean the litterbox with soap and water and put in fresh scoopable litter at least once/month (instead of just continuously adding)
* Some cats prefer to urinate in one box and defecate in a separate box, so you may need 2 boxes even if you just have 1 cat. Multi-cat households should have 1 box/cat plus 1 extra.

Q. Changed dog’s food. Now throwing up and with diarrhea, what should I do?
ANSWER : A. Vomiting and diarrhea can occur if food is switched too quickly. Dogs generally need a slow changeover of foods over a period of a week or so to allow their guts and the gut bacteria to adjust. If there has only been one vomiting and diarrhea episode, removing the food for a few hours then feeding a bland diet of boiled chicken and plain rice can help soothe the stomach. You should then return to his old food and begin a gradual changeover of foods starting with 3 days of 75 old/25 new, 3 days of 50/50 and then 3 days of 25old/75 new. However if the vomiting and diarrhea symptoms do not improve, it may indicate something else causing his digestive distress and an appointment should be made with your local vet.

Q. MY CAT HAS HAD DIARRHEA FOR 3 DAYS PLUS AND NOW IS VOMITING WHAT IS WRONG?”
ANSWER : A. Vomiting and diarrhea is an indication of a gastrointestinal problem, either from an infection or irritation or from an internal issue such as kidney or liver disease. 3 days vomiting, especially combined with diarrhea would quickly result in dehydration and I recommend you get her assessed and treated as soon as possible. I would not recommend any home remedies and delaying treatment any longer

Q. I have a cat that defecates in the litter box but always urinates outside the box. It is very annoying.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his eliminating outside the box.

If medical issues are ruled out, take a look at other reasons. Has there been a lot of unusual activity? Has you cat been left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Is it big enough? Have you changed the type or brand of litter? Is there something attractive about the spot he uses? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out to express their dissatisfaction.

The general rule is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped daily, if not more often and changed completely weekly, washed with soap and water only. You can offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystals, it makes a hissing sound when wet that startles some cats and make them reluctant to use it again. The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure any other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litter box. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation. And, when cleaning up pet accidents, don’t use any cleaner containing ammonia. This leaves behind a scent similar to urine.

Q. My cat started to pee outside the litter box. What should I do?
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate bathroom use in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his defecating outside the box.

Once medical issues are ruled out, it’s time to take a look at other explanations. Has there been a lot of activity that wasn’t normal? Were you away and your cat was left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox located in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet, or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Have you changed the brand of litter or kind? Or is there something about the spot he has chosen to use that is attracting him in some way? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out as a way of expressing their dissatisfaction.

The general rule of thumb is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped at least daily, if not more often and changed completely on a weekly basis, and washed with soap and water.

You can also offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystal kind, since it makes a hissing sound when wet that can startle some cats and make them reluctant to use it again.

The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litterbox. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation.