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Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Sounds like you need to take the cat to a veterinarian. There are many reasons a cat would loose fur and have red bumps. The best way to find out what’s going on is to see a veterinarian as soon as you can. I’m not sure if all those symptoms are related or if they are all different issues. Talk to the vet about all your concerns and see what they recommend. Try visiting an AAHA accredited veterinary hospital, they run their hospitals to the highest standards.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

According to research, most of the time, it is a result of conditions such as allergies, parasites (ticks, fleas, mites), and infections. A way for you to know if your cat is causing trauma to their fur is to pluck one strand of hair and view it with a microscope.
Feline dermatitis commonly appears as clusters of small red bumps or as a rash. As your cat scratches the irritated areas, this can lead to scabs, lesions, and bald patches.
Most of the time, it is nothing to be concerned about, but it is still recommended to take your feline friend to a vet for a general health checkup. Reasons your cat may be losing hair could be a poor diet, allergies, fleas and ticks, stress, or even hypothyroidism.
Cat hair loss is often down to over-grooming an itchy or sore area, perhaps due to cat skin infections such as ringworm (a fungal infection), common skin parasites such as fleas, ticks and mites, or hormonal problems.
Miliary dermatitis, also called scabby cat disease, is an allergic skin reaction caused by a variety of allergens. The inflammation comes from a systemic reaction to one or more allergens that your cat is both exposed and sensitive to.
There is a long list of possible causes of skin ulcers in cats that includes: Zygomycosis (a type of fungal disease) Urine scald (prolonged urine exposure due to urinary incontinence) Toxic epidermal necrolysis (immune reaction to drugs or infection)
Symptoms of Atopic Dermatitis in Cats

Miliary dermatitis or crusty bumps. Eosinophilic plaques or irritated hot spots on the skin. Scratched, mutilated skin. Thin, long, red lesions or linear granulomas.

So the cat starts scratching, and because cats have very sharp claws, they can get very severe skin lesions very quickly.” However, he adds, cats with flea allergy dermatitis are apt to show distressful signs—reddish, crusty bumps, for example—even in areas that have not been savagely scratched as well as those that …
You may find small, medium, or large bald patches on your cat. The bald patches may be circular and reveal round sores on the skin. Your cat may also show symptoms of hair damage; their once healthy, shiny coat may have patches of weakened or broken hair. Their hair may appear stubbly or discolored.
Compulsive grooming, known as psychogenic alopecia, is usually triggered by a change in the cat`s daily routine or environment, such as moving to a new house or the arrival of a new family member or pet. Cats are very observant and may even feed off of our stress levels.
Psychogenic alopecia is a stress-related disorder. It is an obsessive-compulsive behavior where the cats suddenly cannot stop licking or chewing at themselves. Since grooming releases endorphins (hormones that make the cat happy), they will often partake in this pleasurable and relaxing ritual to help calm themselves.
But if your cat doesn`t have a medical reason to groom themselves, like a wound, that`s called psychogenic alopecia. They will spend too much time licking and grooming themselves, causing sores and hair loss. The primary cause for overgrooming in cats is stress.
Patchy hair loss, especially around the ears and face, that can extend to other parts of the body. Swelling or bumps in affected areas. Scaling in affected areas of skin.
Your vet may recommend giving your cat a soothing oatmeal bath or a rinse of vinegar diluted to one tablespoon vinegar per quart of warm water.
Recovery and Management of Bacterial Skin Infections in Cats

Antibiotics may need to be given daily for three or more weeks. Severe infections may need 8-12 weeks of antibiotic therapy to heal. Superficial infections may be treated until all clinical signs resolve, and then be continued for an extra 7-10 days.

Be gentle as the skin around the wound is often sensitive and easily damaged. A little bit of Vaseline placed into the wound first can help catch any stray hairs and can then be gently removed afterwards.
Histoplasmosis is a chronic, non-contagious fungal infection caused by the soil-dwelling fungus Histoplasma capsulatum. H. capsulatum is found globally and may infect both humans and animals. However, histoplasmosis is uncommon to rare in all but dogs and cats.
The most common clinical signs of feline blastomycosis include difficulty breathing, lethargy, weight loss, fever, cough, ocular changes, neurologic changes, or skin lesions.
The specific appearance of miliary dermatitis is a lot of small pink bumps on the skin, called papules, that are typically about one to two millimeters in diameter. If scratched, these papules develop a small crust.
What are the clinical signs of miliary dermatitis? An affected cat will have a very itchy rash and may lick, bite, and scratch at the affected skin. In some cases, simply touching the affected skin causes the cat to scratch, lick, or twitch.
This condition is also sometimes called “sterile nodular dermatoses”. Skin bumps are often solid tissue masses that are raised from the skin and usually reach diameters greater than 1cm. These bumps may form due to substances or reactions in or outside the body.
How is flea allergy dermatitis diagnosed? Clinical signs often indicate that your pet may suffer from FAD. Itching and hair loss in the region from the middle of the back to the tail base and down the rear legs (the flea triangle) is often associated with FAD.
Itch Treatment

To relieve the itch, some veterinarians prescribe Benadryl for dogs experiencing a mild allergic reaction. For more severe acute reactions, Dr. Oldenhoff recommends oral meds such as oclacitinib or steroids.

Cover problem areas with a bandage or shirt.

If bitter sprays or Elizabethan collars don`t work for your cat, covering up the problem spot is another good temporary solution. Ask your vet about putting a bandage over an itchy wound or infected area on your cat`s skin to reduce licking.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

Read Full Q/A … : I found Pickle on

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. My cat has a major rash on her back it looks like red bumps an some have even turned into scabs.
ANSWER : A. Skin disorders can be particularly vexing to diagnosis and treat. One of the most common causes of skin rashes in cats is allergic dermititis caused by the bites of fleas. Some cats are very sensitive to the bite(s) of fleas and will react with excessive itching, scratching, and scabby bumps particularly on the lower back and nape of neck. Finding fleas on your cat is a pretty good indicator that fleas are causing the skin irritation. Unfortunately, NOT finding fleas doesn’t rule out an allergy to fleas, as it takes only one bite from a flea to cause a reaction in sensitive cats. Moreover, there are many other possible causes for skin rashes in cats, including thyroid disease, fungal diseases, bacterial or viral infections, and irritation from chemicals in the enviroment (scented litter, fabric sheets, air freshners, floor and carpet cleaners, etc.).
A trip to the veterinarian is your first step in treating skin disorders. Your vet will examine your cat, checking for fleas and other external parasites and also looking at the distribution pattern of the rash which will help your vet to determine what might be causing the rash. If necessary, your vet may take hair or skin samples for analysis. Blood work may also be necessary if your vet suspects thyroid diseases or another metabolic disorder.

Q. My cat has had hairballs and is licking/gnawing/scratching and is losing large patches of fur, and has red bumps on his skin and scabs on the skin
ANSWER : A. Sounds like you need to take the cat to a veterinarian. There are many reasons a cat would loose fur and have red bumps. The best way to find out what’s going on is to see a veterinarian as soon as you can. I’m not sure if all those symptoms are related or if they are all different issues. Talk to the vet about all your concerns and see what they recommend. Try visiting an AAHA accredited veterinary hospital, they run their hospitals to the highest standards.

Q. Should cats be declawed, or should they have their claws capped?
ANSWER : A. Declawing is the removal of the claw and last bone of that digit, and I would definitely advise against it. Many people assume that declawing is more or less like trimming your nails or getting a manicure, but the truth is that it is a painful and permanently crippling procedure. In fact, some countries have outlawed this procedure.

Not only is it painful, but declawed cats often find it hard to function normally without the last bone and claw. As a result, many cats experience behavioral changes, such as becoming more aggressive.

Besides, if you’re planning to have your cat go outside anytime in its life, I would highly recommend never to declaw your cat, since declawing leaves your cat defenseless, especially while interacting with other animals.

If your cat is clawing up furniture or other objects, I would recommend giving your cat more toys to claw at. In this sense, buying multiple scratching posts would be a very good option.

You might also want to consider discouraging your cat from scratching furniture by using a loud, firm voice whenever the scratching begins.

So, to sum up, having your cat’s nails capped is definitely a better, more humane solution. However, this may not be necessary either if you provide enough toys to claw at, try to correct unwanted scratching behavior, and trim your cat’s claws regularly.

Q. Why is my son’s cat continually licking her belly to the point the hair is falling out and a sore has developed? She is 12 yrs old inside cat.
ANSWER : A. Many things can cause this such as allergies, auto immune disease,etc. However it could be as simple as your cat is bored or stressed out. Have you had any enviromental changes lately that couild be stressing your feline friend out? Outdoor cats are accustomed to chasing, hunting, and playing with all sorts of critters. Sometimes indoor kitties need added stimulation to keep them “sane”. Try gsetting your cat some toys to play with. A laser pointer can be a great interaction toy for the two of you to play with. You can also try getting your fury friend a scratching post or a cat tower that will allow him/her to sit and look out the window. A good product for stressed out kitties is Feliway. Feliway is a pheremoene that mimics pheromones produced by recent mothers to kittens. This product comes in a plug-in diffuser or a spray and is available over the counter at most animal hospitals. The spray form of Feliway can be particularly usefull to calm kitties who get stressed when put in a cat carrier. Simply spray Feliway in your carrier before you load your cat up. If none of the above has worked it sounds like it is time to use this technique to get yourcat into the carrier and to the vet. There they can perform diagnostics such as skin cytologies, allergy testing, skin scrapes to determine what the problem is.
One thing i forgot to mention at the beginning is you certainly need to rule out fleas as the cause. If a cat has a flea allergy just one flea bite can drive them crazy and cause them to lick thier belly raw and hairless. Revolution is a great monthly topicall product for fleas,heartworms, and intestinal parasites. Even indoor cats need flea protection. Good luck!

Q. My Cocker Spaniel keeps getting lumps on her body. She has some on the top of her head that feel soft with about six or so clumped together.
ANSWER : A. Lumps and bumps are very common in dogs. They can be caused by any number of things ranging from allergic reactions, to pockets of infection under the skin, to various tumors and cysts. If the bumps are spreading rapidly, or are very bothersome to your dog it is best to have a vet look at it to make sure it is not serious.

Allergic reaction bumps will often appear as small, red, itchy pockets of bumps anywhere on the body. These are usually treated with an allergy medication or over the counter antihistamine. Abscesses are pockets of infection under the skin that usually are one large bump, however in spreading infections may have other bumps appear. These are often painful or hot to the touch, and may ooze debris that is yellow or greenish in color. Abscesses are usually drained and then an antibiotic given to clear up the infection. Some tumors can also appear as small bumps that begin to spread and their type can be determined through biopsy of the site if other more common causes are ruled out.

Until you can have your vet look at the lumps, it is best to stop your dog from licking or chewing at them. Licking and chewing can cause cuts and scrapes to open, allowing bacteria and infection to spread over the affected area. An Elizabethan collar, or a T-shirt over the affected area can help prevent licking and chewing.

Q. My cat is pooping outside of the litter bix. He is 2 1/2. He did this as a kitten. It stopped then started about 3 months ago. Litterbox is clean.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination or house soiling can be a frustrating problem but with a bit of detective work on your part, there is hope. First, before deciding that this is a behavioral issue, any medical problems (diarrhea, constipation, fecal incontinence, pain on defecation, etc.) need to be ruled out and/or treated. If your cat receives a clean bill of health from your vet but is still eliminating outside the litterbox, then we need to consider that something about the box itself might be aversive to your cat. Cats can be quite finicky about their litterbox and toileting habits. Below I have listed common recommendations and cat preferences for litterbox use. Review the list and make any changes that could account for your cat’s aversion to defecating in the litterbox:
* Soft, fine-grained clumping litter (vs, coarse-grained, non-clumping litter)
* Unscented
* 1 – 1 1/2 inch depth (especially older cats or cats with hip problems)
* Larger pans (especially for large cats) – want to get whole body inside – poop just outside the box might mean the box is too small
* Open, non-hooded
* At least one shallow side to get in and out easily
* Easy to get to – not hidden away, preferably in areas they spend time in or near – and not near appliances that make scary, unpredictable noises (washers, dryers, refrigerators)
* Scoop minimum 1X/day – preferably 2
* Clean the litterbox with soap and water and put in fresh scoopable litter at least once/month (instead of just continuously adding)
* Some cats prefer to urinate in one box and defecate in a separate box, so you may need 2 boxes even if you just have 1 cat. Multi-cat households should have 1 box/cat plus 1 extra.