Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Could be having an allergic reaction to something. If on face you need to be careful because of the airways. If gets bad you should see a vet. If not and is reaction then should go after a while.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Cat flu is most commonly (over 90% of cases) caused by infection with feline calicivirus or feline herpesvirus. Both of these viruses can lead to discharge from the eyes, and conjunctivitis. Other signs of cat flu include sneezing, nasal discharge, lethargy, inappetence, and fever.
Swelling can have many causes including a cat bite abscess, dental disease, insect bite, allergy etc. A vet check would be needed to determine what is going on and prescribe the appropriate medicine. In the mean time, prevent any rubbing or scratching the area.
What To Do if Your Cat`s Face Is Swollen. If your cat`s face suddenly swells and/or is paired with any of the following, take them to the emergency veterinarian as soon as possible: Lethargy. Having trouble breathing.
One of the most common causes of facial swelling in cats is an allergic reaction in which the immune system overreacts due to a sensitivity to substances. Cats can be allergic to almost anything, including food, pollen, medication, and certain household chemicals.
Cats that have infectious conjunctivitis may also show symptoms of an upper respiratory infection, such as sneezing, a runny nose, a fever, lethargy, or decreased appetite.
The symptoms of thelaziasis in cats can vary, depending on the severity of the infection and the number of worms in cat`s eyes present. Some common symptoms include: Eye discharge: The infected eye may produce a thick, yellowish discharge.
A frequent cause of eye discharge in cats, these can be caused by viruses such as feline calicivirus, a contagious respiratory disease; pneumonitis or rhinotracheitis (herpesvirus); bacteria; and protozoa. Symptoms can be mild or become very serious and may include a sticky, pus-like eye discharge.
Causes of Eye Inflammation in Cats

Non-infectious causes may include allergic reaction, irritation due to the presence of foreign bodies, and exposure to chemicals, toxins, and certain plants. Conjunctivitis may also develop as a symptom of another disease such as cancer or tumors of the eye and feline leukemia.

The most common manifestation is itching skin, either localized to one area or a generalized reaction all over the cat`s body. Another manifestation involves the respiratory system and may result in coughing, sneezing, and wheezing. Sometimes, there may be an associated nasal or ocular (eye) discharge.
What is Feline Stomatitis? Feline Stomatitis is a condition seen in many cats where chronic inflammation affects the soft tissues of the mouth (gingiva and mucosa). It is also known as gingivostomatitis, lymphoplasmacytic stomatitis, or more accurately mucositis.
Swelling of Conjunctival Tissue (Chemosis)

Swelling of the conjunctival tissue around the cornea occurs to some degree with all cases of conjunctivitis, but the most dramatic examples are seen with trauma, a deficiency of proteins in the blood (hypoproteinemia), allergic reactions, and insect bites.

However, in meningoencephalitis, depression, blindness, partial paralysis of the face or limbs, loss of balance or motor control, seizures, behavioral changes, agitation, head tilt and circling behavior, and loss of consciousness (including coma) can develop, depending on the severity and location of the inflammation.
Feline herpesvirus conjunctivitis is a form of primary conjunctivitis caused by the highly infectious feline herpesvirus (FHV-1). Herpesvirus infection is the most common cause of conjunctivitis in cats. Usually, herpesvirus conjunctivitis is self-limiting and will resolve within two weeks.
Another tip is to add wet food to their diet to ensure they remain hydrated. Additionally, coconut oil has been found to be an effective way to soothe an upset tummy. Lastly, try out some steam therapy by placing your cat in a warm and humid bathroom for about 15 minutes.
Eye discharge in cats is typically a symptom of an underlying condition and not a disease in itself. Eye discharge is usually an indication of an infection, injury, or other problem and can cause serious discomfort for your cat.
Ocular discharge is a common sign of eye disease in cats. Abnormal discharge may develop suddenly or gradually. The discharge may be watery, mucoid (gray, ropy), mucopurulent (yellow-green, thick) or bloody. In general, the more discharge present, the more serious the disease.
Facial swelling is a common symptom with a range of possible causes, including injuries, allergic reactions, and infections. Rarely, it can be a sign of anaphylaxis, a life-threatening allergic reaction.
Cats may also develop a fever, lose their appetite, be reluctant to move, depressed, or lethargic. You may notice heat and swelling over the affected area, which may also be painful when touched. If limbs are involved, the cat may develop a limp in the affected leg.
Minor cat eye infections will clear up on their own without treatment, but it`s still important to keep a close eye on your cat`s symptoms to track if they get better. If the eye infection does not improve within 2 weeks, take your cat to the vet to rule out the possibility of a more serious eye condition.
Natural treatment for eye infection

If you believe your dog or cat may have some eye irritation, try using a homemade saline solution made from 1/4 teaspoon of salt and 1 cup of lukewarm water. Drip the saline solution into your pet`s eye using a cotton ball or eye dropper 3 or 4 times a day.

Is conjunctivitis in cats contagious? The most common causes of conjunctivitis in cats are highly contagious to other cats. However, viruses such as FHV-1 and calicivirus are not contagious to humans and other animals.
Most pets will not need to be tested for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. When testing is appropriate, samples should always be collected by a licensed veterinarian in consultation with a state public health veterinarian or state animal health official after a complete evaluation of an ill pet.
Trials will examine antiviral drugs, stem cell therapy

The first drug, remdesivir, is an antiviral drug with emergency use authorization from the FDA to treat COVID-19. If fully licensed, veterinarians could prescribe it to affected cats in the future. The second drug, GS-441524 is closely related to remdesivir.

The symptoms of cat allergy usually do not appear immediately. Rhinitis (runny nose and congestion) seldom becomes severe before 15-30 minutes, and asthma symptoms begin after 30 minutes. Symptoms may not occur until there have been several days of cumulative exposure.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. My cat has wheezy breathing, his third eyelid is almost half closed, lots of the time his eyes look tearfilled, phlegm in back of throut he coughs up
ANSWER : A. Wheezing, hacking, and eye tearing in cats is often the result of a viral upper respiratory infection. Symptoms may include sneezing, eye or nasal discharge, nasal congestion, eye squinting, lethargy, and inappetence. Common causative agents include herpesvirus and calicivirus. An exam with your veterinarian is recommended to make sure that his vital signs are normal, including a normal temperature. If he’ll let you check his temperature at home, you can. I suggest lubricating a thermometer and checking his temperature rectally. A normal body temperature for cats will range between 100.5 to 102.5. If his temperature is 103 or higher you should consider bringing him in to your vet. Additionally, if you see yellow/green discharge from the eyes or nose, increased frequency of sneezing, lethargy, loss of appetite, or open-mouth breathing I suggest bringing him to your vet right away. Viral infections, just like in people, can weaken the immune system allowing bacterial infections to occur, which requires veterinary prescribed antibiotics. If there are any other cats in the house, I recommend temporarily isolating them from your sick cat until his signs resolve. Minimizing environmental stress is also recommended for his recovery. If you have any other concerns or are interested in additional information I’m happy to follow-up with an online consultation.

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

Read Full Q/A … : I found Pickle on

Q. Weak, discharge from eyes, swelling on right eye, does not want to open eyes. What is wrong?
ANSWER : A. If the discharge from the eye is green or yellow in color, it can indicate a secondary infection. Swollen eyes can be caused by a number of things ranging from allergies to infections, to injury to the eye itself or surrounding areas.

It is best to have your pet’s eye examined by your local vet. They will most likely wish to place a stain in the eye that can check for damage such as cuts or scratches. An ointment can then be given to help reduce inflammation, pain and take care of infection.

Until you can get to the vet, be sure to not let your pet scratch or paw at their eye as this can make things worse. You can also use a warm wet washcloth to gently remove any debris and allow the eye to open some, providing relief. However, if symptoms worsen, or the swelling travels to the face, head or neck, it may indicate a serious allergic reaction which should be treated immediately.

Q. My cat has a runny nose along with runny eyes. Should I worry?
ANSWER : A. Runny noses and eyes are common disorders in cats, and are usually a sign of an underlying condition. The most common one being an Upper Respiratory Infection.

This condition, also known as “cat flu”, is seen most often in kittens. It is caused by one of several viruses or bacteria and common symptoms include a runny nose, runny eyes, sneezing, wheezing and congestion.

In some cases, the discharge may change color to greenish or yellow, indicating a secondary infection. Cats that are in high stress environments or in contact with other cats are most likely to get URIs.

At home, be sure to keep your cat eating and drinking to prevent dehydration. You can also use a warm washcloth to remove any debris from the eyes or nose that is making seeing or breathing difficult.

Finally, keep in mind that if the symptoms continue for more than a day or two, the discharge becomes green or yellow, or your cat appears to be feverish or in distress, veterinary care should be sought without further delay.

Q. My cat is pooping outside of the litter bix. He is 2 1/2. He did this as a kitten. It stopped then started about 3 months ago. Litterbox is clean.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination or house soiling can be a frustrating problem but with a bit of detective work on your part, there is hope. First, before deciding that this is a behavioral issue, any medical problems (diarrhea, constipation, fecal incontinence, pain on defecation, etc.) need to be ruled out and/or treated. If your cat receives a clean bill of health from your vet but is still eliminating outside the litterbox, then we need to consider that something about the box itself might be aversive to your cat. Cats can be quite finicky about their litterbox and toileting habits. Below I have listed common recommendations and cat preferences for litterbox use. Review the list and make any changes that could account for your cat’s aversion to defecating in the litterbox:
* Soft, fine-grained clumping litter (vs, coarse-grained, non-clumping litter)
* Unscented
* 1 – 1 1/2 inch depth (especially older cats or cats with hip problems)
* Larger pans (especially for large cats) – want to get whole body inside – poop just outside the box might mean the box is too small
* Open, non-hooded
* At least one shallow side to get in and out easily
* Easy to get to – not hidden away, preferably in areas they spend time in or near – and not near appliances that make scary, unpredictable noises (washers, dryers, refrigerators)
* Scoop minimum 1X/day – preferably 2
* Clean the litterbox with soap and water and put in fresh scoopable litter at least once/month (instead of just continuously adding)
* Some cats prefer to urinate in one box and defecate in a separate box, so you may need 2 boxes even if you just have 1 cat. Multi-cat households should have 1 box/cat plus 1 extra.

Q. I just adopted my cat, about 7 months old, and he has discharged, a greenish color, coming from his eyes. Was told it was stress but what else?
ANSWER : A. I would call the rescue and explain your concerns. I wouldn’t think green mucus coming from eyes means stress and maybe whoever told you that was trying to just brush off the symptoms has nothing to worry about. Rescues normally guarantee the health of their animals and should cover the cost of medical bills if you need to take the cat into the vet. Green color can mean infection. Is the cat sneezing? Could it be an upper respiratory infection? Try to explain to the rescue they need to take the animal into the vet. If they aren’t interested in helping please take the cat to the vet as soon as you can. Make sure to bring all records you have on the cat incase the doctor’s office see’s any mistakes or missing fecal tests/vaccinations they would like to do at a later date with the cat (If the cat is sick they would never give vaccinations the same day).

Read Full Q/A … : Eye Problems in Cats

Q. My dog got into a fight with a cat. I think the cat scratch her eye. I clean it out with water. I have gentak can I put that in there?
ANSWER : A. It is best NOT to place anything in the eye unless specifically instructed to do so by your vet as it can cause more damage to the eye. As cat scratches and bites can easily become infected and the eye is a very sensitive area, it is best to schedule a veterinary appointment as soon as possible to have the eye examined. Your vet can place a fluorescent stain in the eye to check the extent of the damage and can then give you a pet-safe medication to place in it as needed to help it heal. Until you can get to the vet, it is best to keep the eye clean of debris and discharge with a warm wet washcloth, and to prevent your dog from scratching or clawing at the eye with the use of an Elizabethan (cone) collar.