Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Drooling can indicate getting something that tasted bad, nausea, tumor of the mouth, throat or esophagus, mouth pain or something caught in the mouth. I recommend getting him in to see your vet as soon as possible for an oral exam and possibly x-rays to determine the cause for his symptoms and get him started on treatment.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Serious causes of bad breath and drooling in cats include kidney disease, oral tumors, and intestinal blockage. Your vet will examine your cat for underlying health issues and treat the bad breath and drooling based on its cause.
It is usually caused by the cat being overly excited, feeling nauseous, or having an oral health issue. The saliva can be clear, white, or yellow and there may be saliva bubbles present. If a cat is drooling excessively, it is important to contact a veterinarian to look into the underlying cause.
Is Cat Saliva Harmful to Humans? The short answer: yes, cat saliva is harmful to humans. Cats host several types of bacteria in their mouth, including Pasteurella multocida, Staphylococcus, E-coli, and Salmonella, which all have zoonotic potential (able to infect humans).
To prevent most cases of bad breath, brush your cat`s teeth – ideally, every day – using tooth gel for felines. “Link the brushing to a treat, such as drinking water from a dripping faucet or a favorite canned food,” advises Dr. Davis.
Consuming foods high in sugar and starch can make saliva more adhesive, leading to problems with dental health and difficulty swallowing. Oral hygiene: Poor oral hygiene can lead to bacteria build-up in the mouth, making the saliva thick and sticky.
Drink at least 8 to 10 cups of fluid to help prevent dehydration and help thin saliva. Drink warm fluids to help clear your mouth of thick saliva and to help `wash` food down. Rinse your mouth and gargle with club soda or baking soda rinse (1/4 tsp baking soda mixed with 1 cup water) before and after eating.
Stomatitis in cats is a complex, painful, and frustrating disease that causes severe inflammation of the entire mouth, including the gingiva (gum tissue around the teeth) and mucous membranes. Feline stomatitis [often called feline chronic gingivo-stomatitis (FCGS) by veterinary dentists] affects up to 10% of cats.
Cats and Wildlife, a Deadly Combination

An animal that escapes or looks fine when rescued from a cat`s mouth still needs immediate attention and application of an antibiotic from a veterinarian or a licensed wildlife rehabilitator. Cat saliva is deadly, so in spite of the antibiotics, many of these animals will die.

This is evidence of the cat`s immune response to the presence of plaque and is often painful. Much like morning breath in humans, the plaque and bacterial overgrowth is what causes the powerful, fishy smell coming from your cat`s mouth.
When it`s outside the norm, there can be various reasons for the stink such as periodontal disease, lymphocytic plasmacytic stomatitis, upper respiratory infections, oral cancers, kidney disease, liver disease, diabetes or intestinal blockage.
Dry mouth is a common clinical problem, and different products have been proposed to improve it. Making products such as mouthwash or lozenges using yogurt can help to reduce dry mouth.
Try consuming foods and drinks that contain lemon, ginger, and garlic. A 2018 survey found these may help treat colds, coughs, and excess mucus, though there isn`t much research to back it up.
The antihistamine diphenhydramine can also reduce hypersalivation, with no increases in rates of constipation when compared to placebo. The antihistamine chlorpheniramine and benzamide derivatives both reduce hypersalivation, but adverse effects were not reported.
The three most common dental diseases in cats are gingivitis, periodontitis, and tooth resorption, and the severity of each of these conditions can vary significantly. Dental disease in cats can cause serious pain and discomfort, which can impact a cat`s quality of life.
Many kinds of bacteria (germs) called Capnocytophaga live in the mouths of dogs and cats. These germs do not make dogs or cats sick. Rarely, Capnocytophaga germs can spread to people through bites, scratches, or close contact from a dog or cat and may cause illness, including sepsis.
Daily (or at least twice weekly) brushing is the key to keeping your cat`s teeth and gums healthy. Adult cats can be pretty resistant to having their teeth cleaned, so it`s a good idea to get them used to this process and to having your fingers in their mouth from when they`re kittens.
Cats carry bacteria in their mouths, which can lead to local or systemic infection if a cat licks an open wound. Immunocompromised people are most at risk. Acquiring a disease from your cat is very rare, but to be safe, don`t let your cat lick your face or any cuts on your skin.
A cat with rabies can pass the virus to their owner. In order to become infected with rabies, you need to have direct contact with the saliva of an affected animal. This doesn`t mean you can get rabies if a cat licks or drools on you. The saliva needs to come in contact with a mucus membrane or broken skin.
Skin odor is a common manifestation of a skin infection. The most common skin infections in cats are bacterial (superficial pyoderma) and yeast (Malassezia dermatitis) infections. Skin discharge and/or odor can indicate that your cat may be suffering from a skin infection.
A healthy cat`s breath should have minimal smell. The Ontario SCPA Humane Society indicates your cat`s breath should smell fairly neutral, and any sort of bad smell is a sign of oral hygiene problems or other health issues. A fishy smell, which is common with cats, is almost always a sign of a problem.
Instead of toothpaste, use plain warm water, a very diluted saltwater solution or one of the excellent tooth cleansers now available for dogs and cats. Most tartar formation occurs on the outer surfaces of the teeth; so give those areas a good scrubbing. If your pet is cooperative, then try for the inner surfaces.
Cats are predators, so part of their natural diet consists of hard bones. Chewing bones knocks off tartar and helps keep their teeth and gums healthy. Since domesticated cats aren`t eating mice and other animals for their daily meals, some veterinarians recommend giving them hard toys to chew on.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

Read Full Q/A … : I found Pickle on

Q. How should I interpret my cat’s tail movements?
ANSWER : A. Our feline friends express themselves in many different ways, including through the use of their tails. Most pet owners pay close attention to a happy or excited dog, but they are sometimes less attentive to the posture and movement of their cat. Here are some of the most common cat tail behaviors, and the underlying emotion behind each action:

A flicking tail: Many anxious, nervous or stressed cats will hold their tail in a low position and flick it quickly back and forth. This is often referred to as angry tail, and a pet owner or veterinarian should be on guard for any possible aggressive or defensive activity. If a cat is moving their tail slowly, and not exhibiting the flicking motion, then this cat is at a much calmer state.

Vertical position: Most of the time when a cat is holding their tail in a straight, vertical position this is indicating curiosity and a playful mood. A cat chasing after a laser pointer or playing toys will often have their tails in a vertical position showing their enjoyment. This position also helps with balanced movements. In contrast, if the tail is in the vertical position and the cat’s back is arched with pinned back ears then this could demonstrate a feeling of being threatened and thus result in defensive or aggressive behaviors.

The Tucked Tail: Similar to a dog, a tucked tail often indicates submission or fear. Your cat is conveying upset feelings and should most likely be left alone. This tucked tail appearance can also make a cat look smaller and less threatening to an aggressive cat.

The Tail Twine: Cats will often hook their tail around another cat’s tail, owner’s legs or other objects to show a friendly and affectionate nature. They are also trying to indicate whether they want to receive affection from their owners, be fed or have playtime.

The next time you are home with your feline companion take note on how they express themselves through their tail movements, their ears, body posture and vocalization. You can start to better understand their needs and wants, in addition to what makes them uncomfortable or happy. Cats will surprise you with their array of emotions and varied expressions they can express.

Q. I want to know from a veterinarian that has owned indoor cats if they agree with declawing? Also, is the whole digit still removed?
ANSWER : A. I am not a veterinarian, but a certified dog trainer. I have studied cat behavior as well, so I have some knowledge in that area. Cats need their claws in my opinion. When a cat is declawed, it can sometimes cause serious anxiety and frustration in the declawed cat. This is because the cat can not de-stress by digging at a scratching post, and a cat feels defenceless without its nails. It is a sad sight to see when a cat who is declawed is dealing with anxiety. I’ve met declawed cats who seem very unstable. It’s difficult to tell whether or not the cats would be so unstable had they not been declawed, but I’ve never seen a cat who has all of its nails act the way a declawed cat acts.

That’s just my two cents.

Read Full Q/A … : snopes.com: Declawing cats

Q. My cat is pooping outside of the litter bix. He is 2 1/2. He did this as a kitten. It stopped then started about 3 months ago. Litterbox is clean.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination or house soiling can be a frustrating problem but with a bit of detective work on your part, there is hope. First, before deciding that this is a behavioral issue, any medical problems (diarrhea, constipation, fecal incontinence, pain on defecation, etc.) need to be ruled out and/or treated. If your cat receives a clean bill of health from your vet but is still eliminating outside the litterbox, then we need to consider that something about the box itself might be aversive to your cat. Cats can be quite finicky about their litterbox and toileting habits. Below I have listed common recommendations and cat preferences for litterbox use. Review the list and make any changes that could account for your cat’s aversion to defecating in the litterbox:
* Soft, fine-grained clumping litter (vs, coarse-grained, non-clumping litter)
* Unscented
* 1 – 1 1/2 inch depth (especially older cats or cats with hip problems)
* Larger pans (especially for large cats) – want to get whole body inside – poop just outside the box might mean the box is too small
* Open, non-hooded
* At least one shallow side to get in and out easily
* Easy to get to – not hidden away, preferably in areas they spend time in or near – and not near appliances that make scary, unpredictable noises (washers, dryers, refrigerators)
* Scoop minimum 1X/day – preferably 2
* Clean the litterbox with soap and water and put in fresh scoopable litter at least once/month (instead of just continuously adding)
* Some cats prefer to urinate in one box and defecate in a separate box, so you may need 2 boxes even if you just have 1 cat. Multi-cat households should have 1 box/cat plus 1 extra.

Q. I have a cat with that virur (aids) could u tell me about her disposition and care
ANSWER : A. Thanks for your question.

Unfortunately the discussion about what you asked has no straightforward answers and can be quite complex.

First thing that I would double check, considering that your cat is very young, is whether she is really infected. It is important to remember that kittens born to FIV-infected queens will receive antibodies from the queen via the milk, and so will test positive early in life though they may not be infected. Kittens with a positive test result should always be retested when they are 5-6 months of age.

Many FIV infected cats are able to live happily with the virus for a long period of time, and indeed the virus will not necessarily ever cause clinical disease.

Different factors will influence the onset of disease in your cat including:

– The ”subtype” of FIV your cat is infected with,

– Her immune response

– The presence or absence of other infectious agents.

To maintain a good quality of life for your cat, I will give you these general guidelines, but you will then find certainly helpful to speak with your veterinarian for specific cases.

– Some antiviral medications used in human patients with HIV infection have also been shown to help some cats with FIV infection. Interferons may have anti-viral effects and modify immune responses. A recombinant feline interferon (feline interferon omega) is available in some countries. Down side is the cost usually.

– Keep your cat away from other cats and possible source of infections;

– Maintain good quality nutrition;

– Keep your cat indoor if possible regularly checked by your veterinarian;

– Keep your cat away from non-infected cats.

Q. We have two female cats who are sisters. One was just diagnosed with generalized lymphoma. Is there risk of being contageous? What kind of food
ANSWER : A. Lymphoma is a cancer and not a bacteria or virus, so it cannot be spread from cat to cat via contact. However, if your cats are related, they may both be genetically predisposed to getting the same type of cancer. Feline lymphoma can also sometimes be caused by the Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) or Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) which CAN be spread from cat to cat. The spread of these viruses is usually through bite wounds, saliva or fecal and urine matter, and the chances of spread among two amicable cats is lower, however testing both cats is always good.

As lymphoma can cause a decrease in appetite, sometimes the best food is one that will keep your cat on her normal eating routine so that she keeps her weight and energy up. Enticing her to eat by warming up wet foods, or even moistening and warming dry foods may encourage continued normal eating and may prevent weight loss from loss of appetite. A high-fat, high protein and low carbohydrate diet (such as a grain-free diet) may also help by providing a more calorie and nutrient dense meal so that every bite is beneficial.

Q. My cat started to pee outside the litter box. What should I do?
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate bathroom use in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his defecating outside the box.

Once medical issues are ruled out, it’s time to take a look at other explanations. Has there been a lot of activity that wasn’t normal? Were you away and your cat was left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox located in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet, or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Have you changed the brand of litter or kind? Or is there something about the spot he has chosen to use that is attracting him in some way? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out as a way of expressing their dissatisfaction.

The general rule of thumb is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped at least daily, if not more often and changed completely on a weekly basis, and washed with soap and water.

You can also offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystal kind, since it makes a hissing sound when wet that can startle some cats and make them reluctant to use it again.

The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litterbox. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation.