his time

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. I recommend you return for s recheck as soon as possible as breathing difficulties put a strain on both lungs and heart and should be stabilized as soon as possible. A chest x-ray may be required to rule to complicating factors or you may need medication at home such as antiinflammatories or inhalers to control his asthma signs

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Although cats can never be truly “cured” of asthma, by carefully monitoring their respiratory effort, keeping an eye out for coughing, and intervening with medication when they need help, owners can help their asthmatic cats live happily for years.
“When a cat is wheezing, it can be a sign of stress, discomfort, or due to more severe concerns, such as respiratory or cardiovascular issues,” explains Dr. Seth Bishop, a veterinarian at Small Door Veterinary.
Asthma is a surprisingly common condition in felines and other mammals and can be the cause of wheezing in your cat or kitten. 1 Prolonged wheezing could mean that they`re having an asthma attack, so keep a close eye on them to see if it`s severe enough that they need medical intervention.
Signs of asthma in cats include:

Body hunched close to the ground with neck extended. Open-mouth breathing. Gurgling sounds from throat. Persistent coughing or gagging.

Like human asthma, chronic feline asthma is incurable but generally manageable. Treatment, according to Dr. Goldstein, depends on the severity of the condition. Most commonly, it involves the use of a corticosteroid drug to reduce bronchial inflammation in combination with a bronchodilator to open up the airways.
Allergens in the fur, skin, and saliva of cats can cause an allergic reaction in some people, which can trigger symptoms of asthma such as wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath. Allergic asthma develops when the immune system mistakenly recognizes cat proteins as allergens.
The primary symptom of noisy breathing in cats is breathing that is audible. The noise can range from a lower-pitched snoring sound to a higher whistling or squeaking noise. It may be accompanied by breathing changes or difficulty breathing.
Medicinal Treatments for Breathing Difficulties in Cats

Your veterinarian may prescribe two drugs to help make it easier for your cat to breathe: typically an anti-inflammatory like prednisolone or fluticasone, and an airway dilator like albuterol or terbutaline.

A wheezing noise between coughs could indicate that your cat can`t get enough oxygen to their lungs. Wheezing is produced in the lower airways and occurs when air passageways constrict, and/or when inflammation causes swelling. This could be an indicator of feline asthma.
Symptoms of an asthma attack are wheezing, a cough, tight chest, and trouble breathing. Wheezing is the classic symptom. Wheezing is a high-pitched whistling or purring sound.
Chronic bronchitis is defined in part by the presence of a daily cough; asthma is defined in part by acute bronchoconstriction that may resolve spontaneously or with treatment. Bronchoconstriction may or may not cause cough in an individual cat (known as cough-variant asthma).
A chest X-ray is necessary to rule out other diseases. While a chest X-ray may not be able to show whether you have asthma per se, it can confirm if another condition is responsible for the symptoms.
Lots of people with asthma are allergic to animals. Some can keep their pets — and others can`t. It depends on a person`s asthma and if having a pet (like a dog, cat, or even a parrot!) makes symptoms worse.
The winter season can be troublesome for your cat`s asthma due to the extreme temperature and dry air. Limit outdoor exposure during winter months in order to avoid these and use a humidifier inside during dry seasons to help prevent attacks.
Asthma in cats is an immunity-related condition and attacks can often be brought on by an allergy or stress. Suspected triggers include pollen, grass, mould, dust mites, tobacco smoke, cat litter, household cleaning products and even some foods.
Eucoleus aerophilus in cats has a direct cycle, with infective eggs being consumed along with food or water. Signs of lungworm infection range from moderate coughing with slightly increased breathing rates to severe, persistent coughing, labored breathing, and respiratory distress or failure.
Presentation. Most infections occur in children and most are asymptomatic. Patients may present with immunologically-mediated symptoms including cough, dyspnoea and wheeze which may present as asthma or bronchitis. Presenting signs may include hepatomegaly, splenomegaly and ocular lesions.
Living and Management. An infection with lungworms does not typically last long. The cat often eliminates the worms by coughing them up or excreting them through the feces. Then, as long as the prescribed medication is given and the cat does not develop a secondary lung disease such as pneumonia, the prognosis is good.
open-mouth breathing. noisy, raspy or wheezy breathing. frequent coughing or hacking. obvious chest or stomach heaving.
In addition to obvious difficulty in breathing in and out, cats exhibiting dyspnea frequently show a variety of associated clinical signs. Their rate of breathing may be noticeably rapid, for example. They may pant noisily with an open mouth and may cough frequently.
Olive Leaf Extract For Pets – A natural antiviral and antibacterial herbal remedy that has been used since ancient times to support a healthy immune system. It is helpful for cats with respiratory conditions including asthma, chronic upper respiratory infections (URIs), allergies, viruses and sinus infections.
The Frequency of Asthma Attacks in Cats

This may not seem like a large number, but it`s important to note that asthma attacks in cats can be life-threatening if left untreated. So, how often do cats have asthma attacks? The frequency can vary from cat to cat, but most cats experience attacks once or twice a week.

Feline veterinary specialists now associate many cases of asthma with a food allergy. Corn, soy, beef and fish can be asthma triggers. Try your cat on my home-prepared diet on my Web site (www.twobitdog.com/drfox) or put him on one of the better brands of cat food, such as Wellness, Evo or Castor & Pollux Organix.
One way to tell the difference is to note your kitty`s body posture, says The Spruce Pets. During an asthma attack, your cat will be hunched lower to the ground than she is when she`s coughing up a hairball, with her head and neck fully extended in an attempt to take in more air.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

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Q. My cat is whizzing heavily! His pcv was 30 last week and he got a shot for his asthma. Normally that took care of all asthma symptoms, not this time
ANSWER : A. I recommend you return for s recheck as soon as possible as breathing difficulties put a strain on both lungs and heart and should be stabilized as soon as possible. A chest x-ray may be required to rule to complicating factors or you may need medication at home such as antiinflammatories or inhalers to control his asthma signs

Q. My cat started to pee outside the litter box. What should I do?
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate bathroom use in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his defecating outside the box.

Once medical issues are ruled out, it’s time to take a look at other explanations. Has there been a lot of activity that wasn’t normal? Were you away and your cat was left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox located in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet, or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Have you changed the brand of litter or kind? Or is there something about the spot he has chosen to use that is attracting him in some way? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out as a way of expressing their dissatisfaction.

The general rule of thumb is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped at least daily, if not more often and changed completely on a weekly basis, and washed with soap and water.

You can also offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystal kind, since it makes a hissing sound when wet that can startle some cats and make them reluctant to use it again.

The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litterbox. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation.

Q. Should cats be declawed, or should they have their claws capped?
ANSWER : A. Declawing is the removal of the claw and last bone of that digit, and I would definitely advise against it. Many people assume that declawing is more or less like trimming your nails or getting a manicure, but the truth is that it is a painful and permanently crippling procedure. In fact, some countries have outlawed this procedure.

Not only is it painful, but declawed cats often find it hard to function normally without the last bone and claw. As a result, many cats experience behavioral changes, such as becoming more aggressive.

Besides, if you’re planning to have your cat go outside anytime in its life, I would highly recommend never to declaw your cat, since declawing leaves your cat defenseless, especially while interacting with other animals.

If your cat is clawing up furniture or other objects, I would recommend giving your cat more toys to claw at. In this sense, buying multiple scratching posts would be a very good option.

You might also want to consider discouraging your cat from scratching furniture by using a loud, firm voice whenever the scratching begins.

So, to sum up, having your cat’s nails capped is definitely a better, more humane solution. However, this may not be necessary either if you provide enough toys to claw at, try to correct unwanted scratching behavior, and trim your cat’s claws regularly.

Q. How should I interpret my cat’s tail movements?
ANSWER : A. Our feline friends express themselves in many different ways, including through the use of their tails. Most pet owners pay close attention to a happy or excited dog, but they are sometimes less attentive to the posture and movement of their cat. Here are some of the most common cat tail behaviors, and the underlying emotion behind each action:

A flicking tail: Many anxious, nervous or stressed cats will hold their tail in a low position and flick it quickly back and forth. This is often referred to as angry tail, and a pet owner or veterinarian should be on guard for any possible aggressive or defensive activity. If a cat is moving their tail slowly, and not exhibiting the flicking motion, then this cat is at a much calmer state.

Vertical position: Most of the time when a cat is holding their tail in a straight, vertical position this is indicating curiosity and a playful mood. A cat chasing after a laser pointer or playing toys will often have their tails in a vertical position showing their enjoyment. This position also helps with balanced movements. In contrast, if the tail is in the vertical position and the cat’s back is arched with pinned back ears then this could demonstrate a feeling of being threatened and thus result in defensive or aggressive behaviors.

The Tucked Tail: Similar to a dog, a tucked tail often indicates submission or fear. Your cat is conveying upset feelings and should most likely be left alone. This tucked tail appearance can also make a cat look smaller and less threatening to an aggressive cat.

The Tail Twine: Cats will often hook their tail around another cat’s tail, owner’s legs or other objects to show a friendly and affectionate nature. They are also trying to indicate whether they want to receive affection from their owners, be fed or have playtime.

The next time you are home with your feline companion take note on how they express themselves through their tail movements, their ears, body posture and vocalization. You can start to better understand their needs and wants, in addition to what makes them uncomfortable or happy. Cats will surprise you with their array of emotions and varied expressions they can express.

Q. I have a cat with that virur (aids) could u tell me about her disposition and care
ANSWER : A. Thanks for your question.

Unfortunately the discussion about what you asked has no straightforward answers and can be quite complex.

First thing that I would double check, considering that your cat is very young, is whether she is really infected. It is important to remember that kittens born to FIV-infected queens will receive antibodies from the queen via the milk, and so will test positive early in life though they may not be infected. Kittens with a positive test result should always be retested when they are 5-6 months of age.

Many FIV infected cats are able to live happily with the virus for a long period of time, and indeed the virus will not necessarily ever cause clinical disease.

Different factors will influence the onset of disease in your cat including:

– The ”subtype” of FIV your cat is infected with,

– Her immune response

– The presence or absence of other infectious agents.

To maintain a good quality of life for your cat, I will give you these general guidelines, but you will then find certainly helpful to speak with your veterinarian for specific cases.

– Some antiviral medications used in human patients with HIV infection have also been shown to help some cats with FIV infection. Interferons may have anti-viral effects and modify immune responses. A recombinant feline interferon (feline interferon omega) is available in some countries. Down side is the cost usually.

– Keep your cat away from other cats and possible source of infections;

– Maintain good quality nutrition;

– Keep your cat indoor if possible regularly checked by your veterinarian;

– Keep your cat away from non-infected cats.

Q. I have a cat that defecates in the litter box but always urinates outside the box. It is very annoying.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his eliminating outside the box.

If medical issues are ruled out, take a look at other reasons. Has there been a lot of unusual activity? Has you cat been left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Is it big enough? Have you changed the type or brand of litter? Is there something attractive about the spot he uses? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out to express their dissatisfaction.

The general rule is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped daily, if not more often and changed completely weekly, washed with soap and water only. You can offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystals, it makes a hissing sound when wet that startles some cats and make them reluctant to use it again. The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure any other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litter box. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation. And, when cleaning up pet accidents, don’t use any cleaner containing ammonia. This leaves behind a scent similar to urine.