Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. It could be a haematoma or an abscess. Either way they need treatment by your vet once they open or sooner by your emergency vet if it is causing distress or discomfort.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

One of the most common causes of swollen ears in cats are ear infections; these ear infections can be classified as bacterial infections (either cocci or rods), yeast, ear mites, or even a combination of all three.
Felines can be affected by basal cell tumors, papilloma and inflammatory polyps, but ceruminous gland adenocarcinoma are the most common form of feline ear tumor. Often appearing as black or purple masses, ceruminous gland adenocarcinoma tumors more commonly affect felines between the ages of five to ten years of age.
An aural hematoma is a collection of blood, either fresh or clotted, within the pinna (ear flap). When a hematoma is present, the pinna will appear very thick and spongy. The swelling may involve the entire pinna or it may involve only one area of the ear.
This isn`t recommended though. If left untreated, the following will likely occur. Your pet will be in pain. Until the hematoma heals, the swelling, pressure, and weight of the hematoma will likely cause discomfort.
Will a Cat Ear Hematoma Go Away on Its Own? The vet may not recommend any treatment plan for your cat if they have small, painless aural hematomas. These hematomas usually heal or go away on their own, but painful swelling may need immediate medical attention.
If an aural hematoma goes untreated, he notes, the condition will be increasingly uncomfortable for an affected cat. “A hematoma can spontaneously resolve,” says Dr. Flanders, “but that can take weeks, and by the time the ear heals, it will tend to be deformed.
Cats can develop inflammation of skin (dermatitis) after being bit by insects that feed on blood, such as mosquitoes, fleas, and flies. Small bumps typically form on the tips of the ears and may be covered with scabs or develop into sores.
Lipomas are benign fatty tumors that present as soft, easily-manipulated lumps under your cat`s skin. They are benign (noncancerous) and appear infrequently in cats compared to dogs (and people).
If your dog has an ear hematoma, most conventional vets will recommend surgery. The vet will drain the hematoma and remove any clots by making an incision in the hematoma. She`ll then suture the ear in multiple places to reattach the skin and cartilage. This will help prevent disfiguration while the ear heals.
What Happens if Ear Hematomas Are Left Untreated? If you let a hematoma heal on its own, the blood will eventually reabsorb. This can happen in as short as 10 days for minor hematomas. Larger hematomas may take weeks or months to disappear.
“The main thing is that the owners have to gently massage the ear” to keep the hematoma draining, Dr. Kaplan explains.
Most haematomas get better quickly and remember to avoid massage to your injured area. Some may take longer to resolve and you might feel a raised lump for some time. After the first 48 hours and whilst you wait for it to heal, just keep gently exercising and stretching the area as long as you don`t cause pain.
Auricular deformity, commonly known as “cauliflower ear” is the result of untreated or inadequately treated auricular hematoma. It is important to recognize and drain auricular hematomas since persistent hematomas can induce cartilage destruction with subsequent deformity of the ear.
The swelling and pain of the hematoma will go away. This takes from 1 to 4 weeks, depending on the size of the hematoma. The skin over the hematoma may turn bluish then brown and yellow as the blood is dissolved and absorbed. Usually, this only takes a couple of weeks but can last months.
As noted above, however, most hematomas will resolve on their own and without the need for direct medical intervention. Nevertheless, there are a variety of at-home remedies that can bring pain relief as well as serve to speed up the healing process.
An ear hematoma is sometimes called a blood blister because it looks like — you guessed it — a blister full of blood. It isn`t likely to be dangerous, but it can be painful. And the longer it`s left untreated, the more scar tissue may develop, which (in some cases) may cause the ear to become permanently disfigured.
Hematomas are larger bleeds that often involve larger blood vessels. With a hematoma, the leaking blood will pool and clot, or form clumps of blood. This can cause a hard and tender mass. When it is closer to the surface of the skin, a hematoma may look like a painful red, black, or blue lump.
Some, however, warrant more immediate attention. Give us a call if your pet`s bump meets any of the following criteria: The area is painful to the touch or when your pet moves, especially any bumps located in the groin or armpit. The bump is noticeably growing or changing over the course of a month or less.
Lumps and bumps are often found while just petting your cat, and they are a common reason cats are brought to the vet`s office for evaluation. Some masses grow quickly and seem to pop up out of nowhere. Others can be painful or irritating, while others don`t seem to bother the pet at all.
Cauliflower ear in cats is a condition that affects the ear flap, or pinna. It is a wrinkled-looking scarring of the ear flap cartilage that occurs after a hematoma, which is a blood-filled swelling caused by a broken blood vessel.
Apocrine cysts appear as multiple, small purple or blue-black bumps in the ear canal. They`re usually benign but can be very painful for your cat. If they rupture, the cysts exude a viscous fluid that`s yellowish-brown to black.
You should never attempt to treat your cat`s sebaceous cyst on your own as this can cause potentially harmful inflammatory responses in the surrounding tissues. Sebaceous cysts can appear anywhere on the body of your cat, but most often occur on their trunk (chest and sides) or legs.
If the infection extends into the inner ear, your pet may keep the head in a tilted position, have continual shifting of the eyes, or walk in circles. Polyps that are in the throat may result in breathing difficulty.
Gently separate the skin and overlying perichondrium from the hematoma and underlying cartilage using the hemostat or other tool. Evacuate the hematoma completely. Irrigate the hematoma pocket with sterile normal saline. Dry the area using gauze.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. One of my pet’s ears seems very irritated. What I can use to clean it with?
ANSWER : A. Ear Irritation can be caused by a number of things ranging from allergies, ear infections or even mites. Dirty ears can also cause irritation and problems. Knowing the type of problem is best for figuring out how to treat it.

For plain dirty ears that do not have any odor, redness or leakage of discharge/debris, a simple over the counter canine ear cleaner can be used. Gently soak some cotton balls or a washcloth with the cleaner, and then use these to wipe out the flap of the ear and opening to the ear. Do NOT use Q-tips as these can become stuck or lodged in the curve of the ear canal and may cause injury to the ear drum.

If the ear is bright red or itchy without any dirt or debris in it, it may indicate an allergy. Sometimes an allergy medication can help provide relief in this situation. Your vet can give you the correct dosages of an over the counter allergy medication to use, or may recommend one specifically for dogs.

For infections and mites, changes to the ear such as bad smell or lots of debris and discharge, flecks of black or brown debris, or scabs and sores in the ear may be present. In these cases, it is best to have your vet take a sample of the ear debris to test for mites or infection. Your vet can then give you an ointment that is placed and left in the ear between ear cleanings. Most vets will then recommend cleaning the ears twice daily and then leaving in the ointment after for a period of ten days.

Ear mites ARE contagious to other pets, so if your dog does have them, it is best to treat any other pets in the house at the same time to prevent the mites from spreading around continuously.

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

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Q. Russian blue mix cat – usually velvet soft coat but hair on back hind qtrs. is thinning, remaining hair seems less velvety than normal
ANSWER : A. Changes in coat appearance can be caused by a number of things. In older cats, hair loss or changes in coat and skin confirmation may indicate a metabolic issue such as thyroid problems. Cats can begin to lose hair and may also show other changes such as weight changes or appetite changes. Blood work is usually done to check for this, and most pets do very well with a daily medication treatment.

Hair loss can also be caused by mites on the skin, external parasites or even skin and fungal infections. These may cause red bumps or sores to appear on the skin in addition to the hair loss and coat changes. Your vet can take a skin scraping of the area to check for mites and infections, and a preventive flea treatment can remove any external parasites. If an infection or mites are present, your vet can also prescribe an antibiotic or topical cream to treat.

After any treatment it may take a month or two for completely bald patches to grow back in. This is normal as the skin and follicles need some time to heal prior to beginning the hair growth cycle again.

Q. How should I interpret my cat’s tail movements?
ANSWER : A. Our feline friends express themselves in many different ways, including through the use of their tails. Most pet owners pay close attention to a happy or excited dog, but they are sometimes less attentive to the posture and movement of their cat. Here are some of the most common cat tail behaviors, and the underlying emotion behind each action:

A flicking tail: Many anxious, nervous or stressed cats will hold their tail in a low position and flick it quickly back and forth. This is often referred to as angry tail, and a pet owner or veterinarian should be on guard for any possible aggressive or defensive activity. If a cat is moving their tail slowly, and not exhibiting the flicking motion, then this cat is at a much calmer state.

Vertical position: Most of the time when a cat is holding their tail in a straight, vertical position this is indicating curiosity and a playful mood. A cat chasing after a laser pointer or playing toys will often have their tails in a vertical position showing their enjoyment. This position also helps with balanced movements. In contrast, if the tail is in the vertical position and the cat’s back is arched with pinned back ears then this could demonstrate a feeling of being threatened and thus result in defensive or aggressive behaviors.

The Tucked Tail: Similar to a dog, a tucked tail often indicates submission or fear. Your cat is conveying upset feelings and should most likely be left alone. This tucked tail appearance can also make a cat look smaller and less threatening to an aggressive cat.

The Tail Twine: Cats will often hook their tail around another cat’s tail, owner’s legs or other objects to show a friendly and affectionate nature. They are also trying to indicate whether they want to receive affection from their owners, be fed or have playtime.

The next time you are home with your feline companion take note on how they express themselves through their tail movements, their ears, body posture and vocalization. You can start to better understand their needs and wants, in addition to what makes them uncomfortable or happy. Cats will surprise you with their array of emotions and varied expressions they can express.

Q. Dog has dry ears and it itches him. Any recommended soothing lotions??
ANSWER : A. I will answer this question as if you are speaking of the inside of the ears (not the external). Most dogs ears aren’t dry unless they have other skin issues such as skin allergies, which can be seasonal or year around and caused by many different things, such as foods, environment, dust, grass, pollen, and products (shampoos, perfumes, etc). Check in the ears for waxy build up. The ears should be clean of any wax and dry. If they have build up, I would take a cotton ball, and soak half of it in a dog ear cleaning solution. This solution should be made specifically for dogs, and your local vet would most likely sell the appropriate brand.

I would address any possible skin allergies, if they do not have any other skin issues, then looking inside the ears and cleaning with a good ear cleaner (should be alcohol free—because alcohol is very drying) If the ear scratching continues regularly then bring him/her into the vet to have a proper ear exam.

Q. My cat has a major rash on her back it looks like red bumps an some have even turned into scabs.
ANSWER : A. Skin disorders can be particularly vexing to diagnosis and treat. One of the most common causes of skin rashes in cats is allergic dermititis caused by the bites of fleas. Some cats are very sensitive to the bite(s) of fleas and will react with excessive itching, scratching, and scabby bumps particularly on the lower back and nape of neck. Finding fleas on your cat is a pretty good indicator that fleas are causing the skin irritation. Unfortunately, NOT finding fleas doesn’t rule out an allergy to fleas, as it takes only one bite from a flea to cause a reaction in sensitive cats. Moreover, there are many other possible causes for skin rashes in cats, including thyroid disease, fungal diseases, bacterial or viral infections, and irritation from chemicals in the enviroment (scented litter, fabric sheets, air freshners, floor and carpet cleaners, etc.).
A trip to the veterinarian is your first step in treating skin disorders. Your vet will examine your cat, checking for fleas and other external parasites and also looking at the distribution pattern of the rash which will help your vet to determine what might be causing the rash. If necessary, your vet may take hair or skin samples for analysis. Blood work may also be necessary if your vet suspects thyroid diseases or another metabolic disorder.

Q. My cats nose is stopped up on antibiotics. She has a loss of appetite, acting normal though. Is 3 ounces of can food enough in 24h? 9 pound cat
ANSWER : A. Cats with stopped up noses tend to eat much less, as you’ve noted, because they can’t smell their food as well. And the smell of food is pretty important to a cat’s appetite. You can start by warming up the food in a microwave – not too hot, test it yourself by putting your finger right in the center, as the temperature of microwave food can vary – as this will intensify the smell and hopefully make your cat more interested.

Saline nose drops, like those that are used on little kids, are safe to use on a cat to clean the discharge that is dried around and in the nose. There’s a brand called Little Noses that’s available in the U.S. That I like. You can put it on a q-tip and try to remove the debris. Humidifying the air with a humidifier can help as well, or you can put the cat in the bathroom and run the shower enough to generate steam. Don’t use “real” nose drops like Neo-synephrine or anything else like that – cats quickly build up resistance to them.

A 3 oz can of food is an OK amount in 24 hours, but do try the techniques above to help your cat get more interested in food. You might also try some baby food – no garlic or onions in the ingredients – as cats usually really like the taste of it.