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A. You should see a vet to check what is going on whit this nipple. It can be inflammed, there can be a tumor, cyst, infection. Clinical examination is necessary to make a diagnosis

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

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Mastitis. Mastitis is inflammation and infection in a mammary gland. It`s a very painful condition that causes swelling, redness, and often discharge from the nipple. Mastitis is most common in lactating dogs, and those having a phantom pregnancy.
Pseudopregnancy, mastitis, mammary tumors, mammary gland hyperplasia, infections, trauma, or certain medications can all contribute to nipple enlargement in female dogs.
Although it is usually limited to one or two teats, mastitis is extremely painful and, if left untreated, the bacteria can spread and the mama dog can become seriously ill. Mastitis causes the mammary gland to become blocked, so milk cannot be released. The teat swells and becomes red and painful to the touch.
Causes of Canine Mammary Gland Swelling

Normal swellings of the glands occur during the heat cycle, pregnancy and lactation. Abnormal swellings of the glands are associated with: Galactostasis is an excessive accumulation of milk in the gland that causes an inflammatory response.

The affected mammary gland may appear dark purple or black in color, as the tissues begin to die off due to overwhelming infection and decreased blood supply. Affected dogs may become lethargic, develop a fever, refuse to eat, or begin vomiting as the infection enters the bloodstream and they develop signs of sepsis.
Treatments can include aggressive antibiotics along with warm compresses applied to the affected teat. The infected teat will need to have the milk expressed to alleviate some of the pain and help prevent an abscess from forming. Puppies should not be allowed to nurse from the affected teat.
If you are petting your dog and you notice a lump along the mammary chain, please have your vet examine her. In intact female dogs you may notice lumps that come and go after the heat cycle. These are typically due to mammary gland hyperplasia (proliferation of normal mammary tissue).
Mastitis symptom: red, inflamed skin

One of the most common signs of mastitis is redness, caused by inflammation. Drink plenty so you stay hydrated, and feed your baby as often as you can.

In these early stages, the dam may not show any overt signs of illness and may show only minimal discomfort. As mastitis progresses, the affected mammary glands become increasingly swollen and inflamed, discolored (frequently red or purple), and very painful. In severe cases, the dam can become very ill.
Inflammatory mammary carcinoma is specific type of malignant mammary tumor. Dogs have severe swelling, redness and pain of the gland with the tumor. This can extend throughout the entire mammary chain on the affected side or can affect both mammary chains at the same time.
The average survival time for dogs diagnosed with a malignant mammary tumor is variable, depending on the type (sarcoma vs. carcinoma), stage, spread of the tumor, degree of invasiveness, and grade. It can range from 1 month to almost 2 years but depends on the dog`s diagnosis.
If your mother dog`s nipples are irritated, a warm compress may ease some of her discomfort. Make sure that the compresses are not too hot by placing them on your skin to see if the temperature is comfortable, as this can burn the dog`s nipples and injure her further. Do not apply lotions or ointments.
The condition can quickly progress from a mild infection in one gland to an abscess in the gland or even a fatal systemic illness1. Because of this, it`s crucial to bring your dog to the vet as soon as you notice any symptoms of mastitis. The quicker your dog gets treated, the better recovery they`ll have.
For non-septic mastitis, which commonly occurs at weaning about 3-4 weeks after birth, common signs include swollen glands that are painful to touch, even though the dog is relatively healthy and alert. In severe cases of mastitis, the mother will be sick and may show symptoms such as: Fever.
If the infection is mild, early treatment at home will help reduce pain. For example, you can apply warm compresses to the mammary glands. For warm compresses, you can use cabbage leaves or towels. When your dog lactates, the teats flush out bacteria with the milk.
Untreated mastitis can cause gangrene, abscesses, or lead to a septic shock. Therefore, it is vital to treat the condition immediately. In case of a severe infection, bacteria enter the bloodstream, and this causes sepsis.
Antibiotics. If you have an infection, a 10-day course of antibiotics is usually needed. It`s important to take all of the medication to minimize your chance of recurrence. If your mastitis doesn`t clear up after taking antibiotics, follow up with your doctor.
Drain the mammary glands.

You can also gently massage around the teat using your index finger and thumb to help your dog lactate. The tissue should always feel soft. As soon as it starts feeling hard, that signals there is a buildup of milk that needs to be removed.

A nursing mother will have more pronounced nipples than a female without a littler or a male dog, but in general, nipples are small, round bumps that appear in a line from your dog`s sheath up his stomach. Nipples can be pigmented or the color of your dog`s skin –- both are considered normal.
Signs a Female Is in Heat

Swollen nipples – Sometimes, but not always, the nipples and breasts will swell slightly. This can also be a sign of a phantom pregnancy, when a female may begin to show signs of being pregnant even if she`s not.

Swollen nipples in dogs is a common sign seen in mastitis. Mastitis occurs when there is an infection of the mammary glands. Mastitis can occur in female dogs who are in the process of nursing. In mastitis, the dog`s mammary glands become swollen and painful.
Cancerous or malignant tumors can be hard or soft. The feel of a mass and whether it bothers your dog has little to do with whether it is cancerous or not.
A plugged duct presents as a painful, swollen, firm mass in the breast, often with overlying reddening of the skin, similar to mastitis, though not usually as intense. Mastitis, though, is usually associated with fever and more intense pain and redness of the breast.
Swelling, tenderness, and warmth in breast tissue. Skin redness, most often in wedge shape. Tender or enlarged lymph nodes in armpit on the same side.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. How can I keep my 14 year old Yorkie from snapping at the younger ones?
ANSWER : A. It’s all about management. Do not allow the 7yo’s to interact with your 14yo unsupervised. You should be there each time they interact so you can redirect the 14yo’s attention onto some toys, or onto some treats when the 7yo’s are around. It sounds like you need to help your 14yo make positive associations with being around the younger pups. You should be trying to feed him treats each time he interacts with them, and doesn’t snap at them. Pet and praise him each time he is around them, or any time they are near. As I said, keep the separated when you cannot supervise their interactions because if you aren’t around when he is snapping at them, you could end up with a fight on your hands.

It could also be that they spend too much time together. Imagine spending 100% of your time with somebody, day in and out, doing everything together… including going to the bathroom.. that might bother anybody. I think you should give them more time apart from each other. Take them all on separate walks, separate them to play with them individually, separate them when you take them to potty, separate feeding times in separate rooms, etc. This can help alleviate the stress your older dog is feeling due to living closely with other dogs. You should always be giving individual activities in a houseful of dogs anyway.. when you expect them to get along 100% of the time, that’s when you find trouble.

Q. My Chihuahua has one swollen nipple it is red and 3 times normal size
ANSWER : A. You should see a vet to check what is going on whit this nipple. It can be inflammed, there can be a tumor, cyst, infection. Clinical examination is necessary to make a diagnosis

Q. My Pug’s nose is red and he doesn’t have a yeast infection. He is taking medicine for that. It seems to get worse when he goes outside. Any ideas?
ANSWER : A. Redness or irritation can be caused by a number of things including yeast infections as you mentioned, but can also be caused by allergies to the environment, or even cold or hot weather. Dogs with short fur can often get sunburns on the skin, and the cold may also irritate or cause redness when outdoors. Allergies to pollens or other outdoor allergens may also cause redness on the body or nose. An allergy medication from your vet is usually all that is needed to clear this up.

If the redness is happening just when outside, it may also be that your dog is digging or nosing around in something that is irritating. It may be a good idea to watch your dog a few times while he is outside to see if there is anything he enjoys exploring. The redness could just be irritation from that.

However, if you are concerned about the redness, it is always a good idea to bring it up with your veterinarian to make sure there is not a more serious cause behind it.

Q. My Chihuahua has one swollen nipple it is red and 3 times normal size
ANSWER : A. It could be due to an infection or possibly an insect bite or sting. You can try applying a cold compress but if there are any other symptoms such as vomiting or lethargy or it doesn’t subside then you need to see your vet for appropriate treatment as soon as possible.

Q. My dog itchs all the time a codozon shot helps but don’t cure it after a bath she turns red and still itchs I changed dog food that didn’t help no fle
ANSWER : A. Do you live in a region where fleas are prevalent. Where I live the fleas are truly horrible, and I see many animals developing a flea allergy. This usually presents as relentless itching especially at the base of the tail, although it can be all over the body. Often on exam I won’t find a single flea, just red bumps, hair loss and itching. In response, I will start animals on an oral steroid such as prednisone (I think your doctor has administered an injectable steroid), while at the same time bathing the animal and starting on an oral flea preventative such as Comforts which I then re dose at 3 weeks instead of 4. Additionally, the environment needs to be decontaminated- flea bombing the house, vacuuming often and washing bedding on hot. The flea life cycle is short, however, so this needs to be one frequently as they will just continue to hatch in your home. Most importantly, I tell my clients, that any steroid (oral or injectable) does not fix the problem, but rather suppress your dogs reaction to it thereby making them more comfortable. Just the steroid alone changes nothing except giving them a brief break from their symptoms.

Now that I have spoken in depth about flea allergy, there is a potential that it is something else. Food allergies are slow to develop, and slow to change. If you wanted to eliminate a potential food allergy I would switch to a novel protein, limited ingredient diet. For example, lamb as the protein source if your previous food was always chicken or beef, and in a formula with very limited ingredients such as lamb, rice and veggies. A pet store should be able to help you with this. While on this diet they cannot have any additional treats for 1 month, to see if you have eliminated the allergy. From an Eastern Medical perspective, I also recommend novel proteins that are “cool”, such as fish, lamb, or duck while avoiding “warm” foods such as beef, chicken, pork.

Finally, all animals with allergies should be on an Omega 3 supplement. Given regularly, this can help reduce overall inflammation in the body both in the skin, joints, and other tissues. Good for allergies, arthritis and overall health. My dogs are on fish oils, but one of my dogs who is allergic to fish gets flax oil instead. I would be happy to consult with you further, but I hope this helps to some degree.

Q. My cat started to pee outside the litter box. What should I do?
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate bathroom use in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his defecating outside the box.

Once medical issues are ruled out, it’s time to take a look at other explanations. Has there been a lot of activity that wasn’t normal? Were you away and your cat was left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox located in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet, or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Have you changed the brand of litter or kind? Or is there something about the spot he has chosen to use that is attracting him in some way? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out as a way of expressing their dissatisfaction.

The general rule of thumb is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped at least daily, if not more often and changed completely on a weekly basis, and washed with soap and water.

You can also offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystal kind, since it makes a hissing sound when wet that can startle some cats and make them reluctant to use it again.

The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litterbox. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation.

Q. We have been treating our 5 year old cat for black bumps that we treated with Special Diet. These bumps grow over his body
ANSWER : A. If your cat has black bumps or other skin lesions forming that have not cleared up with preventive flea treatment or changes in diet, it may be time to request some additional testing as needed. Your vet can take a skin scraping of one of the lesions and send it to a Lab for various tests. One test includes growing any bacteria or fungus present, and then subjecting them to various medications to find which one is best to use. Other tests just look for certain growth patterns to determine if a fungus or bacteria is present which can be treated with oral or topical medications from your vet.

Cats can commonly have chin acne, which is the formation of little bumps that can be red or black in color and may sometimes break open and ooze debris. The cause of this acne is unknown, however one theory is that cats can actually get bacterial infections from rubbing their chins on plastic food dishes or dishes that are not cleaned often. Treatment may involve anywhere from none at all in minor cases, to use of wipes, creams or antibiotics for helping clear up any infection.

Q. My puppy has a little bit of blood on the end of his diarrhea is that normal? He poops normally then the second time it comes out all water
ANSWER : A. It is never normal to see bloody stool. Intestinal parasites are a common cause of diarrhea and bloody stool, especially in puppies. Submit a stool sample to your vet to diagnose any parasites. Treat as indicated. Withhold food for 12-24 hours. Allow small amounts of water or unflavored PediaLyte. Resume feeding a bland diet (1:1 ratio of plain boiled boneless chicken and plain white rice). Feed in small, frequent amounts waiting at least one hour between feedings. Continue feeding until the stool is normal. Transition slowly to the regular diet. If the diarrhea doesn’t stop, see your veterinarian.