come out

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. You can try checking her temperature orally. A temperature of 102 or above is considered a fever. Watch your dog for signs of acting different in both energy level and consumption of food and water. Is she vomiting? I would be concerned about an intestinal blockage.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Your dog will likely pass the rock they ate in anywhere from 8 to 24 hours, depending on how large it is. However, dogs can`t pass it without some pain. Eating rocks can also cause intestinal blockage if the rock is too large to pass through the intestines.
Signs that your dog is eating rocks include seeing rocks in your dog`s feces or witnessing your dog eating the rocks. However, the underlying condition can also cause symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain from gastrointestinal issues or weakness and excessive sleepiness from anemia.
Rock eating can lead to intestinal blockages, perforated stomachs, and choking. Even though rocks can damage their teeth, gums, and digestive systems, dogs often chew and swallow these earthly items for a variety of reasons.
His stomach grinds and partially digests food, something it can`t do to rocks and other nonfood items, which can become lodged in the stomach outflow. When a dog`s stomach is obstructed with a foreign object, he`ll probably vomit.
Stones may remain in the stomach for months or years and occasionally a dog will vomit and bring up a foreign body that the owner did not know was there. The stomach is quite large when distended so anything that has managed to be swallowed has plenty of room to move about in the stomach.
But if your dog starts to vomit or becomes lethargic, they should be taken to the emergency clinic. Not all rocks will pass and the longer it stays in the dog`s intestines, the more damage they can do. If a rock is small compared to the dog, it will normally pass through the dog`s digestive system without harm.
The Signs & Symptoms of Intestinal Blockages in Dogs

Painful abdomen to the touch. Restlessness. Straining or unable to poop. Bloating.

Often, these small stones will pass through the urinary tract without being noticed, especially in female dogs. (Females have a much shorter and wider urethra than do males, making it much easier for stones to pass.) However, larger stones may interfere with urination or irritate the lining of the bladder or urethra.
Lots of animals eat rocks. Or at least they swallow rocks; they don`t eat them in the sense of digesting them. This is true of many reptiles and birds that are alive today, and a few mammals such as seals and whales. It was also true of some extinct animals, including herbivorous dinosaurs and marine reptiles.
The symptoms of an intestinal blockage generally occur within 24 hours after swallowing the problematic item. However, depending on where the item lodges, the time frame may vary—the earlier in the system the item is lodged, the sooner symptoms will emerge.
If your dog has eaten plastic or something else they shouldn`t have, feeding a bulky meal to try to pad out any sharp edges and help it to pass can be a good option. Asparagus is often used for this.
Diarrhea/difficulty defecating (pooping)/Straining to defecate: A dog with a partial blockage may have diarrhea as liquid squeezes around the obstruction. If there is a complete blockage, the dog may try to defecate but won`t be able to.
If you just watched your dog swallow a rock, call your veterinarian immediately or better yet, go ahead and take them to the emergency vet. It is better to be safe than sorry and a vet can help you to determine next steps in the treatment process.
The human body digests food in around six to eight hours. In this time, food passes from the stomach to the small intestine. But dogs digest food at a slower rate, taking around eight to ten hours, on average.
Large or irregularly shaped objects may get stuck somewhere along the digestive system and result in your dog needing urgent veterinary attention. Certain breeds are over represented as they are renowned indiscriminate eaters (eg Labradors), with younger dogs and puppies also having a higher incidence.
One of the first symptoms of a gut blockage is often vomiting. If your dog develops a gut blockage, it`s likely that they will need an emergency operation. Contact your vet immediately if you think your dog has eaten something that they shouldn`t have.
For a dog with an intestinal blockage, it`s imperative that the timeline between the incident and treatment is short. Missing these signs of bowel obstruction and abdominal twisting can lead to very serious consequences. Left untreated, complications typically lead to fatality within 3 to 7 days.
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

This is a common surgery that requires general anesthesia. The surgeon will usually make three or four incisions in your abdomen. They`ll then insert a small, lighted device into one of the incisions, check for stones, and carefully remove your gallbladder.

One reason canines do this is that it sharpens their teeth, but there are concerning reasons for this too. Another possible reason dogs eat rocks is due to an enzyme or iron deficiency or even worms-yuck! Other reasons include boredom and loneliness.
Struvite stones form when minerals in your dog`s urine become concentrated, which causes them to stick together and form crystals. This often happens as a result of complications from a UTI. UTIs change the acidity of your dog`s urine to a high pH and prevent the minerals from breaking down properly.
While doing no favors to our teeth, eating rocks actually helps some animals to survive. Many animals need to do this reasons for this: to help digest food or to aid in mobility. Those animals have two different stomachs; one for stones and one for food.
The short answer is none. There are no known medical side effects or undesirable consequences of using Dog Rocks in your pet dog`s drinking water container.
Clearly, chewing rocks and other non-food items can be dangerous to your dog`s teeth, but it can also lead to intestinal blockage, vomiting, diarrhea, or even choking.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My ddog swallowed a small rock yesterday. She didn’t seem to have any problems then, but tonight she seems hot, maybe a temp.? will the rock come out
ANSWER : A. You can try checking her temperature orally. A temperature of 102 or above is considered a fever. Watch your dog for signs of acting different in both energy level and consumption of food and water. Is she vomiting? I would be concerned about an intestinal blockage.

Q. We have a 4 yr old lab-pit mix we raise from 6 weeks.If my husband tries to take hin by the collar and make him go out to pottie he growls.Problem?
ANSWER : A. This is not good behavior. Rather than take him by the collar, call him to come with you. If he’s not good about coming when called, you can work on that. Keeps treats on hand to to entice him out and reward him when he does go potty and he’ll come to look forward to it. Clicker training is another great way to teach a dog all kinds of things, from obedience to tricks.

Have treats on hand that you know he loves, then simply click and treat. He will come to associate the sound with getting a treat. Start putting distance between you so he has to come to you. Call and click and when he comes to you for that treat, treat him and give him lots of praise. Move to hiding somewhere in the house, call and click. When he comes to you reliably inside when you call, click and treat. When this behavior is consistent, move outdoors with a very long leash. Call and click, if he doesn’t respond, give a light tug on the leash. If he takes even a single step toward you, click, treat and lots of praise. Keep doing this until he comes eagerly. Next, try him off-leash in a securely fenced area. Call and click. At this point he should be responding well and coming easily to the call and click. If he does not, go back to the last step he performed reliably and work on that again until he responds well. Eventually, you can start not treating him every time, but still praise him. Gradually lessen the frequency of the treats until he comes just to the click and praise.

Keep training sessions short, ten or fifteen minutes to start, no more than 30 minutes at a time and do it a few times a day. Try not to do it any time he is overly excited so that he can pay attention to you. Always end a training session on a good note, even if it is just getting him to do something he already does well on command. And never, NEVER punish a dog when they come to you, no matter how far they’ve made you chase them, no matter how frustrated and angry you might be. That teaches your dog that coming to you is a bad thing.

Read Full Q/A … : Causes of Limping in Dogs

Q. My puppy will be 8 weeks old tomorrow. I’ve had her for a week now, and she still isn’t responding to any training or her name. What can I do?
ANSWER : A. Try clicker training her to come when called. Clicker training is an effective way of training you dog to not only come when called, but can be used to teach a variety of tricks and tasks.

Have treats on hand that you know she loves, then simply click and treat. She will come to associate the sound with getting a treat. Start putting distance between you so she has to come to you. Call and click and when she comes to you for that treat, treat him and give her lots of praise. Move to hiding somewhere in the house, call and click. When she comes to you reliably inside when you call, click and treat. When this behavior is consistent, move outdoors with a very long leash. Call and click, if she doesn’t respond, give a light tug on the leash. If she takes even a single step toward you, click, treat and lots of praise. Keep doing this until she comes eagerly. Next, try her off-leash in a securely fenced area. Call and click. At this point she should be responding well and coming easily to the call and click. If she does not, go back to the last step she performed reliably and work on that again until she responds well. Eventually, you can start not treating her every time, but still praise her. Gradually lessen the frequency of the treats until she comes just to the click and praise.

Keep training sessions short, ten or fifteen minutes to start, no more than 30 minutes at a time and do it a few times a day. Try not to do it any time she is overly excited so that she can pay attention to you. Always end a training session on a good note, even if it is just getting him to do something she already does well on command. And never, NEVER punish a dog when they come to you, no matter how far they’ve made you chase them, no matter how frustrated and angry you might be. That teaches your dog that coming to you is a bad thing.

Q. Why does my English bulldog have re occurring urinary tract infection since she’s a 8 weeks and she’s 9 months now? And now they say she may have ki
ANSWER : A. As I’m sure your vet has told you it’s pretty unusual for a dog to have had multiple UTI’s starting at 8 weeks of age. I think it’s likely that she has a congential problem, which means something didn’t develop correctly inside or outside her body and it’s making her prone to the UTI’s.

There are a few bladder abnormalities that can contribute to UTIs, including urachal diverticulum (a little pouch or out-cropping of the bladder) and ectopic ureters (the ureters do not enter the bladder at the appropriate spot). On the outside, she could have a redundant vulvar fold, which is predisposing her to trapping fecal matter at her vulva, and the bacteria is ascending up to her bladder and causing recurrent UTIs.

The other possibility of that she got a UTI initially and it was never treated appropriately, i.e. The appropriate antibiotic wasn’t used and it never really resolved, but it seems like it’s coming back. I think this is less likely, as it’s really uncommon to begin with to see UTI’s in dogs this young. I also once saw a 4 month old dog with bladder cancer, but that’s incredibly rare and I think highly unlikely in your dog.

Your question got cut off at the end but it sounded like you were about to say that she may have kidney problems. If that’s right clearly this is becoming a serious problem for her.

Your dog needs a competent vet to work up this problem. It’s likely that she’s going to need some advanced imaging, including possibly an x-ray procedure called a cystogram and possibly an ultrasound. You might consider taking her to a veterinary internal medicine specialist at this point, if one is available in your area.

Q. My cat is excessively scrstching herself., to the point she has sores. She is strictly an indoor cat. Did have flees been treated for 2 months
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. I have two problems with my 16 yrs old dog: he’s constipated and has a ear ache. What can I use to relieve these?
ANSWER : A. Constipation is a common problem in dogs that can be due to a number of things. However it is a good idea to make sure the constipation is not actually diarrhea, as some dogs can strain after a bowel movement, making it look like such. If constipation is present, adding a little pumpkin puree or plain yogurt to the diet can help make digestion easier and make stools easier to pass. However if symptoms do not resolve after a few days, it is best to speak with your vet.

For ear aches, it is best to have your vet examine the ear as many things including allergies, ear infections, mites and more can cause ear problems. If the ear is just dirty, then cleaning the ear gently with cotton balls or a clean washcloth and a dog ear cleaning solution can help. Do not use Q-tips as a dog’s ear has a 90-degree turn in it and placing Q-tips in the ear can cause damage to the canal or inner ear. However if the problem persists or cleaning does not help, it is best to seek care.

Q. I just adopted a Scottish Fold straight ear kitty and have to transport him halfway across the US. What should I be prepared to do when he arrives?
ANSWER : A. So as to not overwhelm him in his new home, you may want to start with a small space for him gradually opening up his environment as he becomes more comfortable over a few weeks. This can be done by placing all of his items in one room. That includes an area where he can perch up high whether in the form of a cat tree or a window ledge lounge seat for example, food & water dishes, litter box (away from the food dishes), toys such as little mice and balls, infused cat nip toys, and a nice soft kitty bed. If he is coming with a towel or blanket, do not wash it and instead lay that in his bed. That will help him feel secure until he becomes acclimated to new surroundings. Also, if he is coming in a small crate, just open the door and let him come out to investigate the new place in his own time. Enjoy your new kitty!

Q. I have a healthy 13yr .Amer Cocker Spaniel. What is usually causes death at her age and breed? Things I need 2 watch 4 such as disease as she ages?
ANSWER : A. Aging dogs of all breeds can have a variety of common problems such as arthritis (joint stiffness), heart and lung problems, and various lumps, bumps and tumors on the body. Watching any dog regardless of breed for signs of slowing down, stiffness, or strange growths on the body is key for finding problems and treating them early.

This article: http://www.petmd.com/dog/breeds/c_dg_am_cocker_spaniel is a great outline on the breed itself and includes a section on various diseases that are common to the breed. Eye, ear and skin issues seem to be the most common problem in Cocker Spaniels and daily grooming and care is usually the best way to watch for any signs of illness or change.

The best way to ensure your older dog’s health is to start scheduling senior wellness check ups every 6 months with your vet. Older dogs often need a checkup more often than the usual yearly recommendation, and building a history with your veterinarian can quickly alert both you and your vet to any potential health issues.