ks tho.

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. It probably is feeling quite poorly after eating fabric. It is good that it is still eating and drinking. If it continues to vomit or stops defecating then contact your vet as may have a blockage.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Socks or Other Fabric

The issue with animals eating fabric is that textiles are not able to be broken down and passed through the digestive system like a stick. Depending on the size of your dog and the size of the sock, they may be able to vomit it back up or eventually pass it through their excretions.

When that doesn`t happen, making your dog throw up something he`s eaten might seem like a good idea. But the reality is that inducing vomiting is something you should only attempt to do under the guidance of a veterinarian.
Thankfully, most upset stomachs should clear up within 48 hours. However, digestive issues can continue longer if the underlying cause is a long-term problem – examples can be chronic stress, a food allergy (if no dietary changes have been made), or an untreated health condition.
Ask your vet if it`s okay to feed a bulky meal of dry food or a slice of plain bread. This may cushion stones or other heavy objects and help them move on out. Food also activates digestive juices, which can help soften wads of rawhide so they pass more readily.
The cloth itself is not harmful or toxic, and as long as it`s small enough, it`s likely to pass right through. Problems will develop when the cloth is too large to pass. In those cases it may lodge in the stomach or intestine.
While there`s no perfect answer to how long a foreign object can stay in a dog`s stomach, it`s generally about two hours. If it`s been less than two hours since your dog swallowed the item, your veterinarian might tell you to try and make your dog regurgitate the item.
If the blockage is in the stomach, the pylorus is often blocked, which will prevent food from making it through the intestinal tract. Therefore, episodes of vomiting will usually occur within a few hours after eating.
However, vomiting typically needs to be induced within 2-4 hours of ingestion to work, and even then, there`s no guarantee that the dog will be able to regurgitate all the toxins. Unfortunately, most cases of poisoning go unnoticed until the dog starts showing symptoms.
Without appropriate and timely treatment, dogs with a complete intestinal blockage will typically see fatal complications within 3-4 days. Given time, some foreign objects can pass on their own.
Diarrhea/difficulty defecating (pooping)/Straining to defecate: A dog with a partial blockage may have diarrhea as liquid squeezes around the obstruction. If there is a complete blockage, the dog may try to defecate but won`t be able to.
One cotton ball may travel through the digestive tract without any interference. It may even partially break down due to the various stomach acids it will encounter. However, if it does get lodged, it could block the dog`s intestines and prevent their digestive system from functioning properly.
A foreign body can therefore remain in the stomach for a long period of time without causing many signs. Sometimes the object will wedge into the outflow from the stomach for a time and prevent food leaving.
Polyester dissolves very easily in solvents and strong acids. Cotton clothing will just be stained but may develop holes when washed. Yes, stomach acid straight from the bile duct is very strong and can damage a lot of things.
It generally takes ingesta (all that is swallowed) from 10-24 hours to move through the entire digestive tract. Some objects, however, can actually remain in the stomach for longer periods of time, even months.
The cost of foreign body removal in dogs depends largely on the type of anesthesia and procedure needed to provide effective treatment. Endoscopic procedures commonly cost between $800 and $2,800, while open surgery, such as laparotomy, may range from $2,000 to $3,500.
Symptoms of an intestinal blockage begin

Within hours, the foreign object can become lodged within your dog`s intestinal tract, causing a complete or partial obstruction. Once the obstruction has occurred, clinical signs may develop such as vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain and loss of appetite.

Emergency surgery is often required to remove the obstruction and any dead tissue. Intestinal obstructions are very painful for dogs and can be fatal if left untreated. During obstruction, blood supply can become compromised, and perforation can lead to septic peritonitis.
The good news is that the intestine can often unblock itself with time and rest. And many people recover from a bowel obstruction without surgery. But surgery may be unavoidable in certain cases, including when complications develop. So it`s best not to delay medical care if you have symptoms of a bowel obstruction.
Most partial blockages get better on their own. Your doctor may give you a special diet that`s easier on your intestines. Enemas of air or fluid can help clear blockages by raising the pressure inside your bowels.
Woven fabrics—like some felts, chenille, herringbone, and other fabrics with visual texture or subtle patterns—are a good call when you`ve got pets, according to Lauren Cox, Design Program Manager at Havenly.
Absolutely! Small amounts of fluff can usually pass unhindered through your dog`s system, but it`s best to avoid the potential for ingestion altogether. Keep an eagle eye on your dog when they`ve got plush in their clutches, and discard it when stuffing first appears or they`re ripping pieces off.
For dogs, raw and whole meals are good options. Organic meals, natural vegetarian sources, and even biodynamic foods are perfect! Foods like beetroots, carrots and even shredded coconut would work towards detoxifying your dog`s gut! This food can clean out your dog`s digestive system and prevent indigestion.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Why does my dog eat grass?
ANSWER : A. As another user mentioned, dogs can eat grass when they want to vomit. Sometimes, when a dog has an upset tummy, they will eat grass. If you notice your dog eating grass frantically, you can assume vomiting will shortly follow. Grass does not digest and pass normally. If your dog eats too much grass, it can cause serious issues with pooping. Your dogs poop can end up all tangled inside of her, and it can need veterinary assistance to remove it. The same goes for celery, so avoid feeding celery to your dog.

The other day my boyfriend accidentally left the laundry room door open where we were keeping the trash that was filled with cooked chicken bones. She ate one of the chicken bones lightning fast. We had to induce vomiting by feeding her some hydrogen peroxide. After we had fed her the peroxide, she immediately began frantically eating grass because her tummy was upset.

If there is something lacking in your dogs diet, it could be that your dog is eating grass to make up for it. I am sure that my dogs diet is extremely well balanced (I do not only feed her an air-dried raw food-type diet (Ziwipeak), but a wide variety of safe, healthy foods), so when she eats grass, I know that it is because she has an upset tummy.

That is why I think it is important making sure your dog has a very well balanced diet. If your dog is on a low quality kibble, your dog may be trying to let you know by eating grass (or eating poop).

Q. My dog ate fabric 3 days ago. Vomitted some this am, defecated some this pm. Pretty sure that’s all of it. Acts lethargic. Still eats & drinks tho.
ANSWER : A. It probably is feeling quite poorly after eating fabric. It is good that it is still eating and drinking. If it continues to vomit or stops defecating then contact your vet as may have a blockage.

Read Full Q/A … : Vetinfo

Q. Why do dogs eat grass?
ANSWER : A. Some pet parents get concerned when they see their favorite canine nibbling on grass in the yard. They wonder whether it is because hunger, boredom or an indication of an underlying illness. Often the consumption of grass will result in vomiting because it irritates the stomach and gastrointestinal tract. This is an extremely common problem for dog parents. There is no one reason for why dogs exhibit these behaviors and it is very much dependent on each dog. Here are some of the reasons why our dogs choose to eat grass:

1. Nutritional Issues

Historically speaking, dogs are considered omnivores, which mean they consume a variety of both meat and plant-based food. There is some indication that dogs with a low fiber diet may choose to scavenge in the grass to fulfill this nutritional deficiency. These dogs may also find that grass has an appealing flavor and consistency. If you feel that this may be the reason for your beloved canine consuming grass then consider discussing with your veterinarian on how to incorporate more fiber into your dog’s diet.

2. Boredom

Many dogs who are not receiving adequate exercise will be become bored and search out activities to occupy their time, including eating grass. Evaluate how much exercise your dog is getting on a daily basis and consider more walks or other fun activities, such as playing fetch or tug of war.

3. Upset Stomach

There is a belief that dogs with an upset or gassy stomach will self-medicate by consuming grass. Vomiting often follows this grass eating activity eliminating the contents of the stomach or changing the gas distension within the gastrointestinal tract. However, there is not much scientific evidence to back up this theory. If you are concerned about too much gastric acid in your dog’s stomach or any other underlying medical issue that could be the reason for their grass eating, consult with your veterinarian.

Overall, grass eating is usually not toxic to your dogs unless your lawn contains chemicals, including pesticides or herbicides. Monitor your dog’s behavior along with his diet and exercise to determine if there is a reason for the inappropriate grass snacking.

Q. Why does my dog eat grass? He throws up afterwards!
ANSWER : A. There is much debate over why dogs eat grass and then vomit afterwards. One theory is that the dog may have an upset stomach, and so eats the grass blades which then irritate the digestive system and causing vomiting to happen. Another theory is that the dogs are eating grass to mimic a “lost nutrient” of their ancestors found usually by hunting and then eating the contents of the stomachs of herbivores. A third theory is that dogs just do it because to them, it’s fun and they can.

If your dog has been vomiting a lot recently, either related to or unrelated to eating grass, then it is always a good idea to schedule a wellness exam with your vet to make sure there are not any issues causing illness. Grass, especially in areas where livestock may graze can also be a host for parasite eggs, which can in turn infect your dog with an internal parasite (and thus cause vomiting and diarrhea).

If your dog is not eating at all, this is more concerning and points further to some digestive upset causing his or her symptoms. Making an appointment with your vet as well as bringing in a sample of his or her stool is best for helping your pet feel better.

Q. Whenever I take my dog on walks he always barks at people and others dogs in my neighborhood. What should I do to resolve the problem
ANSWER : A. The very first thing to do is to make sure your dog is getting sufficient physical and mental exercise every day. A tired dog is a good, happy dog and one who is less likely to bark from boredom or frustration. Depending on his breed, age, and health, your dog may require several long walks as well as a good game of chasing the ball and playing with some interactive toys.

Figure out what he gets out of barking and remove it. Don’t give your dog the opportunity to continue the barking behavior.

Ignore your dog’s barking for as long as it takes him to stop. That means don’t give him attention at all while he’s barking. Your attention only rewards him for being noisy. Don’t talk to, don’t touch, or even look at him. When he finally quiets, even to take a breath, reward him with a treat. To be successful with this method, you must wait as long as it takes for him to stop barking. Yelling at him is the equivalent of barking with him.

Get your dog accustomed to whatever causes him to bark. Start with whatever makes him bark at a distance. It must be far enough away that he doesn’t bark when he sees it. Feed him lots of good treats. Move the stimulus a little closer (perhaps as little as a few inches or a few feet to start) and feed treats. If the stimulus moves out of sight, stop giving your dog treats. You want your dog to learn that the appearance of the stimulus leads to good things.

Teach your dog the ‘quiet’ command. Oddly, the first step is to teach your dog to bark on command. Give your dog the command to “speak,” wait for him to bark two or three times, and then stick a tasty treat in front of his nose. When he stops barking to sniff the treat, praise him and give him the treat. Repeat until he starts barking as soon as you say “speak.” Once your dog can reliably bark on command, teach him the “quiet” command. In a calm environment with no distractions, tell him to “speak.” When he starts barking, say “quiet” and stick a treat in front of his nose. Praise him for being quiet and give him the treat.

As in all training, always end training on a good note, even if it is just for obeying something very simple, like the ‘sit’ command. If you dog regresses in training, go back to the last thing he did successfully and reinforce that before moving on again. Keep sessions short, 15-20 minutes max, and do this several times a day.

Q. My dog doesn’t eat, what should I do?
ANSWER : A. If this is a puppy, see a veterinarian immediately. Puppies should want to eat. Common causes for anorexia in puppies include viruses (parvo is a big one), parasitism, and foreign bodies. They need immediate care – go to an emergency vet if yours isn’t open. Puppies can get low blood sugar and dehydration very quickly.

If this is an adult dog and you observe other concerning signs, such as diarrhea or decreased energy, you should see a veterinarian.

If the dog seems otherwise bright and stable, try offering different types of food: wet food, canned tripe, or cooked chicken and rice. Some dogs will go for canned baby food: chicken, turkey, or beef as the main ingredient. Make sure there are no garlic or onions in the ingredients!

Causes of anorexia in adult dogs can range from less serious to severe. Younger dogs are more likely to get into trouble- they tend to eat things they shouldn’t, and can get foreign bodies from eating things like socks, or stomach upset from getting in the trash. Any dog may stop eating due to stress, or just being a picky eater. Middle aged dogs can stop eating when they’re stressed and also have Addison’s disease, which can be fatal. Older dogs tend to stop eating when they develop cancer or renal disease.

There is no one-size-fits-all recipe to know when the right time is to take your dog to the vet. The moral of this story is, if it’s not getting better, your pup feels bad, or you’re worried – go see the vet!

Read Full Q/A … : My Dog Won’t Eat

Q. My dog hasnt eaten snce I left 4 days ago. I won’t be home for 6 more days. How can the caretaker get her to eat?
ANSWER : A. If your dog is feeling a bit sad while you are away and is refusing to eat, your pet sitter may try some things such as adding in boiled chicken or turkey to meals to encourage eating. A pet-safe gravy may also entice your dog to eat as well while you are gone. Your pet sitter may also want to offer smaller meals more often throughout the day to give your dog more chances to try and eat when she is feeling more comfortable and a little less sad. A game of fetch or playing together may also get your dog’s appetite going and help her to feel more comfortable eating around your pet sitter.

If your dog is showing any other signs of illness in addition to the refusal to eat (beyond normal missing an owner), then it is always a good idea to keep an eye out and contact a veterinarian as needed.

Read Full Q/A … : ufdc.ufl.edu

Q. My 20 month Cavalier doesn’t eat unless I let him eat from my finger, then he eats. Sometimes he will only eat once a day and leave his food.
ANSWER : A. It is possible that your dog is just not satisfied with his current food, or may be a picky eater. There are several things you can try to encourage your dog to eat.

The first step is to remove any additional treats or people food that may be more enticing to your dog than his own meal. If you feel you must give him some form of treat, be sure to place them directly in his food bowl and mixed with his regular diet. This allows him to get some snacks while also “forcing” him to try out his current meal to get the reward.

Enticing your dog to try his food by adding a pet-safe gravy or even a few treats of plain boiled chicken mixed in can help. Be sure to mix the foods thoroughly so he must explore his own food before getting the treat.

Some small breed dogs may also have a hard time with certain bowls and their collars. If there is a metal name tag on the collar and a metal bowl, the clinking sound can sometimes scare off dogs and make them not want to eat from their bowl. Using a bowl of a different material, or removing the collar prior to a meal may help with this issue.

Your dog may also just not be into his current food and may like another variety better. You can try a new variety by gradually switching over a period of 7-9 days, slowly adding in more new food and removing old until it is switched. This change may encourage him to try out meals again, and the slow changeover will allow his body to adjust to the new diet without digestive upset.