ideas

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Try not to let her urinate before going to the clinic. To rule out UTI, have your vet collect a sterile urine sample for urinalysis as well as a culture and sensitivity. The C&S should identify any bacteria if present as well as the most effective antibiotic to use in treatment. Blood work (CBC, chemistry panel, thyroid panel) should also be submitted to check major organ function, especially the kidneys. Abdominal xrays or ultrasound can diagnose tumors or stones in the kidneys or bladder.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Bull Terriers are a generally healthy breed with an average lifespan of 11-13 years. They can suffer from some common conditions such as allergies and kidney disease. Early detection is the key to a long and happy life, so be sure to schedule routine checkups.
Polycystic kidney disease is more common in Terriers, including Bull Terriers, West Highland White Terrier, Cairn Terriers and the Staffordshire Bull Terrier. Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is a rare genetic disease characterized by fluid filled cysts growing on the kidneys.
Some breeds predisposed to lymphoma include: Chow Chow. Basset Hound. Scottish, Airedale, West Highland White, Yorkshire, and Bull Terriers.
You`ve probably heard of hip dysplasia, an inherited disease that causes the hip joints to form improperly and leads to arthritis: it is common in White Bull Terriers. You may notice that he has lameness in his hind legs or has difficulty getting up from lying down.
The average lifespan of an English Bulldog is 8-10 years. However, some bulldogs are known to live for 11-12 years. You can increase your bulldog`s lifespan through proper diet, regular exercise, grooming, and regular veterinary exams.
bull terriers need exercise to manage their energy build-up, failure to do this can cause your dog to have outbursts of rage and aggression. Inadequate stimulation. If not stimulated enough, bull terriers can develop habits like tail chasing and excessive barking.
Bladder infection, or a UTI (this of course is the most common cause of blood in dog`s urine). The prostate (this would be an issue for male dogs who pee blood, which possibly indicates an issue with the prostate). Bladder stones could also be a culprit, due to nutrition, genetics, or persistent infection.
The Bull Terrier is fairly healthy, but genetic health problems that have been seen in the breed include heart disease, deafness, luxating patella, and eye disorders, such as ectropion and keratoconjunctivitis sicca, or dry eye.
Final Stage Dog Lymphoma Symptoms

Breathing difficulties (which is frequently indicated by laboured panting) Glassy eyes. Restlessness and discomfort. Unwillingness or inability to move or even stand.

Weaknesses…

Typically healthy and hardy, the Bull Terrier is prone to various skin allergies, whilst being susceptible to more serious afflictions such as kidney insufficiency and failure, heart defects, slipped patella, and zinc deficiency.

Coat Care. While Bull Terriers do shed—quite a lot, according to Bebb—they generally require little more than a quick weekly once-over with a soft-bristled brush. Even when they do get dirty, they tend to ditch much of the dirt they`ve picked up by the time they reach the front door, so baths are rarely necessary.
Among the most comical and mischievous citizens of dogdom, the Bull Terrier is playful and endearing, sometimes stubborn, but always devoted. These unique `eggheads` are exuberant, muscular companions who thrive on affection and exercise.
The average lifespan for dogs is between 10-13 years, though there is variability among breeds and sizes. As a species, the domestic dog is incredibly diverse in size, build, and appearance, thanks to human intervention.
Bull Terriers may look tough, but they`re softies at heart who enjoy nothing more than cuddling with their humans. If your Bull Terrier often seeks out your presence for a cozy snuggle, pressing their body against yours or curling up in your lap, it`s a heartwarming sign of their love.
Sometimes they`re looking for a signal that you might be about to take them for a walk or feed them a meal. If you`ve trained your dog to respond to hand or voice signals, they might be waiting for a signal to tell them what to do next. Other times, they`re just observing you so that they can know more about you.
Some of the earliest signs of kidney disease in dogs may include subtle weight loss, urinating/peeing more often and drinking a lot more water. Therefore, if you notice your dog is peeing on the floor or asking to go out more, or if your dog is always thirsty, it`s time to visit your veterinarian.
Symptoms of Kidney Failure in Dogs

Weight loss. Nausea and vomiting. Pale gums. Loss of balance, or stumbling.

Many cases of blood in dog urine are caused by infections and can be successfully treated simply with antibiotics and anti-inflammatories. Other causes such as bladder stones may require surgical removal. If your dog has been diagnosed with urinary crystals, changing the diet to a prescription urinary diet can help.
Blood clots don`t always look worm-like in your pee. Most of the time, they look like small, reddish, or darkish chunks floating in otherwise normally colored urine. This is especially common if the clots are from menstruation or a minor injury to the pelvic area. Sometimes, you`ll see just one small chunk by itself.
PKD is an inherited condition. Dogs who receive a defective copy of the gene from either one of their parents may show signs of polycystic kidney disease (autosomal dominant inheritance). PKD is most diagnosed in bull terriers. Other predisposed breeds include Cairn terriers and West Highland white terriers.
Bull Terriers are highly energetic dogs and they need constant exercise to stay fit and active. They cannot be confined to smaller areas. They need to go out for their daily running and exercising. Right from the very beginning, they must be trained to become obedient and follow instructions.
Lymphoma is classified based on stage.

Stage 3 is multiple lymph nodes on both sides of the body. Stage 4 Involves the liver and/or the spleen. Stage 5 is disease within the bone marrow or abnormal locations (eyes, CNS, bone, lungs, etc.).

The median age of dogs with lymphoma is 5 to 9 years old. There is no gender predilection, but Boxers, Basset Hounds, St. Bernards, Scottish Terriers, Golden Retrievers, Airedale Terriers, and Bulldogs are some of the most common breeds reported.
Dogs with multicentric lymphoma may also develop lethargy, fever, anorexia, weakness, and dehydration as the disease progresses. Dogs with alimentary lymphoma, which affects the intestines, may present with vomiting, abdominal pain, anorexia, diarrhea, and weight loss.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. my english bull terrier female age 11 years is passing blood in her urine also few clots we are at the vets thurs but was just wondering any ideas
ANSWER : A. Try not to let her urinate before going to the clinic. To rule out UTI, have your vet collect a sterile urine sample for urinalysis as well as a culture and sensitivity. The C&S should identify any bacteria if present as well as the most effective antibiotic to use in treatment. Blood work (CBC, chemistry panel, thyroid panel) should also be submitted to check major organ function, especially the kidneys. Abdominal xrays or ultrasound can diagnose tumors or stones in the kidneys or bladder.

Q. My 10 years female Shih Tzu is drinking much more water than normally but she doesn’t urinate more? Should I be concerned?
ANSWER : A. It would be a good idea to have her examined by a veterinarian to have a senior work up. Your vet can run bloodwork to screen for diseases that commonly occur as dogs age. Kidney disease, liver disease, diabetes, and Cushing’s disease are examles of diseases that are common in older dogs and cause an increase in drinkng and urinating. It is always a good idea to have senior blood work done so that your veterinarian has a baseline to compare in the future, espcially since your dog seems to be drinking more than normal. Your vet can also look at a urine specifica gravity to evaluate the concentration the the urine.

Q. Male neutered cat [1 1/2 years old] has just started trying to spray everywhere around the house. Nothing is coming out. No recent changes.
ANSWER : A. Changes in urinary habits can be caused by a number of things, especially in neutered male cats. Attempting to urinate or have accidents in places other than the litter box can often be a sign of a urinary tract infection, or crystals and debris in the bladder causing problems. Pets may need to go more frequently, may dribble or urinate in small amounts more often, may have accidents or may have blood-tinged or cloudy urine.Infections are usually treated with medications and changes to the diet, however in some cases of large stones or crystals surgery may be needed.

Male cats can also experience urinary blockage. This is due to a unique anatomical part or the urethra that forms a U-shape before exiting the body in male cats. If a cat has crystals or other debris in the urine, it can block at this point preventing urine from being able to exit. Cats may attempt to urinate without producing anything, may become very vocal (indicating pain) or may have a hunched back, full abdomen or pain in the abdomen (protecting the very full bladder). Urinary blockage IS a medical emergency so if suspected, your vet or local emergency clinic should be contacted immediately. Treatment usually involves a hospital stay and catheterization of the bladder to remove the blockage and allow urine to drain followed by medications and a change in diet to prevent further problems.

It is best to try and collect a sample of urine and make an appointment for your cat if he has had a change in urinary habits. If you do suspect a blockage, then contact your vet ASAP is best.

Q. How do I know if my pet has heartworms? What is the treatment?
ANSWER : A. Heartworms are a concern in certain parts of the world, such as the USA and warmer parts of Canada, South America, Australia, Southern Europe, Japan, South East Asia and the Middle East. They are transmitted by mosquitoes sucking blood from an infected host and then passing the developed larvae onto a new host through a mosquito bite.

The mature heartworms can be up to 1ft long and can live for 5-7 years in dogs and 2-3 in cats. They live in the heart, lungs and associated blood vessels. The heartworms can cause lung disease, heart failure and even lead to death. Even after having removed the worms, the pet can still be left with damage to these areas.

Symptoms of heartworm infestation include coughing, weight loss, decrease in appetite and lethargy. In severe cases you may also notice pale gums, dark urine and laboured breathing, due to sudden blockages of blood flow produced by large numbers of worms.

Prevention is much better than the cure, and if you live in an area where heartworm is prevalent you should treat monthly year round. If you are unsure if it is a problem in your area, I suggest you ask your local vet. Also, your vet will be able to advise you about the most effective treatments available to you.

Treatment depends on the level of infestation and the veterinarian’s preferences. The pet will need to be stabilized before treatment can begin and exercise should be kept to an absolute minimum. In severe cases, surgical removal of the worms may be required.

Q. Why is my male dog recently peeing on the furniture?
ANSWER : A. Sudden changes in behavior or habits such as suddenly having accidents can sometimes have a medical basis behind them. Common causes such as urinary tract infections may cause a dog to begin urinating in the house, going more frequently, or having cloudy or blood-tinged urine. It is always a good idea to schedule a wellness exam with your local vet to check for any health issues prior to looking for behavioral ones.

If your dog checks out healthy, other things could be causing his change in behavior. If he is not neutered and is reaching puberty (usually around 7-8 months of age, though it does vary by breed), he may be starting to have a marking behavior. This is when a male dog lifts his leg and leaves just a little bit of urine behind to mark that he was there. Neutering can sometimes help stop or decrease the behavior though it may take several months for results as it takes some time for the surge in hormones to leave the body. Stress, or anxiety if another dog or person in the house may also make the behavior appear as a dog tries to claim his place in the household, or if he is stressed out by another pet.

Be sure to also clean any accident areas with an enzymatic cleaner. These cleaners are designed to break down urine particles and remove scent, making it so your dog cannot smell where he has had an accident before. This can sometimes prevent dogs from repeatedly urinating on an area they had staked out before.

Q. Has not eaten in 2 days. Noticed a little blood on the fur on her butt. What can I do?
ANSWER : A. Blood near the rear can be caused by a number of things. Bright red blood in the stool or around the anus can indicate a problem with the colon or anal region such as constipation, tears, illness or problems with the anal glands.

Blood that is dark or black in the stool can indicate a problem with the upper intestines such as the stomach or small intestine. This is usually considered more serious than bright red stool, however any blood seen is cause for concern. If the blood is seen more than once or twice, making a vet appointment is a must.

If your dog is not eating and is having blood in either her stool or vomit, making an appointment with your local vet is best. Illness, digestive upset or problems with internal organs can all cause these symptoms. In the mean time, a bland diet of plain boiled chicken and plain white rice may help to soothe minor digestive upset until you can get into the vet.

Q. My cat seems to have lost control of her bowels and no longer uses her litter box even to urinate. She is 5 or 6 yrs and is in good health otherwise
ANSWER : A. If your cat has had a sudden change in litter box habits, it is always a good idea to rule out any underlying issues with a wellness check from your vet. Bringing in a urine and stool sample if possible can also help as tests can be run on these samples to check for common infections or parasites. If these are present, treating them usually helps resolve the problem of not using the box.

Loss of bowel control usually results in dribbling of feces or urine rather than complete accidents. If you are seeing this, it is possible that an injury to the hind end or problem with the nerves or muscles is happening and should be looked at by your vet.

If the accidents are complete (full amount of stool, big puddle of urine) your cat may be choosing not to use the litter box due to illness, a too-dirty litter, litter pans that are too tall (which may make older cats have a harder time getting in and out), or a litter substrate that was changed too suddenly. Sometimes, changing the environment your cat’s litter box is in by lowering the sides, moving food and water dishes away and returning back to a previously liked litter can help.

In any area of an accident, an enzymatic cleaner should be used. These break down urine and stool particles, making it so that your cat is less likely to be attracted to going there again. Moving stools to the litter box can also entice your cat to start going there again.

Q. My cat is excessively scrstching herself., to the point she has sores. She is strictly an indoor cat. Did have flees been treated for 2 months
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.