Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Blood can come from urinary tract but also from the vagina or remnants of the uterus. You should collect an urine sample and see a vet. It can be urinary tract disease but also ovarian remnant syndrome or infection of the vagina.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Check Signs of Internal Bleeding: After they`ve been spayed, your dog may experience internal bleeding during the recovery period. You can determine internal bleeding with signs such as wheezing, having a swollen belly, blood seeping out of the stitches, lethargy, unconsciousness, or pale gums.
If your spayed female dog has a swollen vulva with a bloody discharge, it is possible that some ovarian tissue remained within her abdomen after her spay surgery. Infections, injuries, and tumors can also make a dog`s vulva appear to be swollen.
From a health perspective, male dogs that aren`t neutered can develop serious infections of the prostate, as well as testicular cancer and tumors, which can require invasive and expensive surgery. Unspayed female dogs can also cause a whole other set of problems — one big one being that they can get pregnant.
What Do You Do When Your Dog Gets Her Period? The best way to care for your female dog during her period is to keep her clean and comfortable while limiting her exposure to male dogs who may be interested in mating with her.
Therefore blood pressure in the blocked arteries and ducts are increased which lead to edema of the skin of the scrotum and sometimes a little bit bleeding in ductus deferens . If your dog shows these signs after castration, refer him to your vet to manage it.
Expect blood tinged urine for 3-7 days post-op. This is normal and should not be a cause for alarm as long as it resolves in a timely manner. KEEP HER AWAY FROM MALES for at least (1) week. It takes about a week for the “scent” of heat to fade away.
An unneutered male dog can live with a spayed female but issues could arise such as excessive mounting, sniffing, or licking which, in turn, increases stress and potentially fuels behavioral issues.
Early spaying of female dogs and cats can help protect them from some serious health problems later in life such as uterine infections and breast cancer. Neutering your male pet can also lessen its risk of developing benign prostatic hyperplasia (enlarged prostate gland) and testicular cancer.
Your dog will only bleed for around half of the total cycle, usually 7 to 10 days. Generally, bigger dogs bleed more than smaller dogs, but it varies between dogs.
It is normal for a dog in estrus (heat) to continue to have bleeding even after they`ve been bred. As long as the bloody discharge isn`t excessive and you dog isn`t acting unusually (not eating, acting lethargic,vomiting or having diarrhea) then this shouldn`t be cause for concern.
Hormone-responsive incontinence occurs in neutered dogs of both sexes but most commonly in female dogs. The pet can urinate normally, but they leak urine while resting. Hormone-responsive incontinence can occur months to years after a pet is neutered.
Bloody urine may be due to a problem in your kidneys or other parts of the urinary tract, such as: Cancer of the bladder or kidney. Infection of the bladder, kidney, prostate, or urethra. Inflammation of the bladder, urethra, prostate, or kidney (glomerulonephritis)
Gross hematuria makes your urine look pink, red, or brown. Though the color difference may be alarming, it only takes a small amount of blood in the urine to cause a color change. In most cases, gross hematuria does not cause pain or other symptoms.
Pyometra most commonly occurs in females >6 years of age, however we have also seen the condition in younger dogs, and occasionally in very young female dogs. It is most commonly diagnosed 1-12 weeks following the dog being `on heat`. 1 in 4 undesexed female dogs will develop a pyometra during their lifespan.
Pyometras are categorized as “open” or “closed.” In an open pyometra, infectious material leaks from the uterus; owners may notice a bloody, yellow, or cream-colored discharge on their dog`s fur near the uterine opening or on their bedding.
They should be fine. As I said above, a male will only react when a female is in heat. Spayed females don`t go into heat, so no problems.
The spaying operation, called an ovariohysterectomy, includes complete removal of the uterus and ovaries, the tissues that release hormones and create the estrus cycle. After spaying, your dog`s reproductive cycle should cease and she should not exhibit any more estrus signs.
Spay surgery can increase a dog`s of developing hypothyroidism. Physiological changes after spaying may affect your dog`s metabolism and appetite, making her prone to weight gain. Spaying puppies before they are five months of age could put them at greater risk of becoming obese.
An age of six to nine months of age may be appropriate for neutering or spaying a toy breed puppy or small breed puppy but a larger or giant breed may need to wait until they are near or over 12-18 months of age.
Austad and Hoffman say spayed and neutered pets live longer, healthier, happier lives because they have fewer behavioral issues and they are less susceptible to infections, degenerative diseases, and traumatic/violent causes of death.
Not only are they not fertile, but their reproductive organs won`t open for penetration unless they are in heat so they can`t even engage in intercourse. If you discover that your female dog has engaged in intercourse, chances are that her heat symptoms were minimal or silent, so you did not realize she was in heat.
There is no significant disease carried by dogs and cats that are known to spread to a human through exposure to blood. But you can contract infections from infected pet body fluids. Exposure to pets` blood can be hazardous, and once it occurs, one should wash it off immediately with plenty of water.
How long does a dog in heat bleed? Dogs in heat tend to bleed for approximately a week to 10 days. Some dogs bleed very heavily and others so lightly that it`s barely noticeable.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My unfixed grown male dog is slobbering and trying to mount my new male puppy. What’s that about?
ANSWER : A. Mounting behavior can be both a sexual thing in dogs, or a behavioral one. If both dogs are male, it may be that your older dog is trying to establish that he is the boss of the house by trying to mount your younger one. Stopping the behavior is best to prevent any fights from breaking out. Both female and male dogs can do this to each other, and spay/neuter status does not usually play any factor if behaviorally related.

If your younger dog is female, or not spayed, and is about 6-7 months of age, it may be that she is coming into her first heat and your male is very interested in her. Dogs should not be bred during their first heat, and if you do not wish to have puppies in the future, one or both dogs should be fixed.

Q. Why is my male dog recently peeing on the furniture?
ANSWER : A. Sudden changes in behavior or habits such as suddenly having accidents can sometimes have a medical basis behind them. Common causes such as urinary tract infections may cause a dog to begin urinating in the house, going more frequently, or having cloudy or blood-tinged urine. It is always a good idea to schedule a wellness exam with your local vet to check for any health issues prior to looking for behavioral ones.

If your dog checks out healthy, other things could be causing his change in behavior. If he is not neutered and is reaching puberty (usually around 7-8 months of age, though it does vary by breed), he may be starting to have a marking behavior. This is when a male dog lifts his leg and leaves just a little bit of urine behind to mark that he was there. Neutering can sometimes help stop or decrease the behavior though it may take several months for results as it takes some time for the surge in hormones to leave the body. Stress, or anxiety if another dog or person in the house may also make the behavior appear as a dog tries to claim his place in the household, or if he is stressed out by another pet.

Be sure to also clean any accident areas with an enzymatic cleaner. These cleaners are designed to break down urine particles and remove scent, making it so your dog cannot smell where he has had an accident before. This can sometimes prevent dogs from repeatedly urinating on an area they had staked out before.

Q. How do I determine how much my overweight pet should weigh?
ANSWER : A. There are many tools to determine overweight and obesity levels in pets. A new tool, morphometric measurements and body fat index, are available to accurately determine a pet’s ideal weight; this will allow an accurate determination of the amount of food a pet should receive to achieve weight loss. Feeding the correct amount will lead to greater weight loss success.

There are many weight loss food options to help pets reach their ideal weight. Your veterinarian can help make a ideal weight recommendation. Here are some tips to help your dog lose weight in a healthy and safe way:

1. Diet: Providing a healthy and well balanced diet is essential to your pet’s overall health. Finding the right food for your dog can be a challenging process. For those overweight animals many commercial dog companies offer weight loss diets, but it is important to evaluate food labels for adequate nutritional content.

You want to ensure you are not missing other essential vitamin or mineral content. Volume of food is also important and the amount of food that works for one breed of dog may not be the same for another breed of dog. Portion control as opposed to free-choice feeding can help your dog to drop a few unnecessary pounds.

There are also prescription weight loss foods designed by veterinary nutritionists, such as Hill’s r/d (http://bit.ly/1AoENSd). Some pet owners find that home cooking is the best option for helping to provide a well-balanced and realistic diet plan. There are websites such as balanceit.com that offers recipes to fit your dog’s specific needs. Consulting with your veterinarian or a veterinary nutritionist to find the appropriate diet is a great way to help your dog be as healthy as possible.

2. Exercise: Another great tactic for weight loss for your dog is exercise. Whether this is through running, walking or playing with a favorite toy all of these are wonderful types of exercise to help keep your dog at a lean and healthy weight.

For those pet owners with busy schedules utilizing professional dog walking services or playtime through dog daycare services is another option. It has been shown that those pet owners that exercise regularly with their pets generally live a healthier lifestyle.

3. Physical therapy: As animals age pet owners offer encounter their favorite canine having more difficulty walking and have a dwindling desire to play with toys. Physical therapy, specifically hydrotherapy is a wonderful way to help older and arthritic animals gain more mobility and lose weight. Hydrotherapy has been proven to have several therapeutic effects on the body including, muscle strengthening, relief of swelling, decreased joint pain, less stiffness in limbs, improved circulation, weight loss, and increased tissue healing to name a few. For more information on the benefits of hydrotherapy:
http://bit.ly/1w1qqoy

4. Veterinary visit and blood work: Weight gain can also be related to underlying health concerns such as hypothyroidism or other endocrine disorders. Scheduling a veterinary evaluation and routine blood work can be another important component in increasing the longevity of your dog’s life. Conditions such as hypothyroidism that predispose dogs to gain weight can be treated with a daily medication to improve hormonal balance. If feel that your dog is unnecessarily overweight there can be an underlying health condition that needs to be addressed.

5. Healthy treats: Pet owners love the chance to reward their favorite canine companion with treats and most dogs jump at the chance to consume these delicious products. The problem is many treats, which can include commercial dog treats or table scrapes can add many unnecessary calories to your dog’s daily intake. Reading labels and making note of the calories in these treats is an important component of understanding your dog’s overall health. Treats should not exceed more than 10 percent of your pet’s daily calories. There are healthier treats that can be offered to your pet to keep calories lower yet provide a fuller sensation. A pet owner can add steamed or pureed vegetables, such as carrots, green beans or sweet potato to add more fiber and thus a fuller feeling for your dog.

Q. Male neutered cat [1 1/2 years old] has just started trying to spray everywhere around the house. Nothing is coming out. No recent changes.
ANSWER : A. Changes in urinary habits can be caused by a number of things, especially in neutered male cats. Attempting to urinate or have accidents in places other than the litter box can often be a sign of a urinary tract infection, or crystals and debris in the bladder causing problems. Pets may need to go more frequently, may dribble or urinate in small amounts more often, may have accidents or may have blood-tinged or cloudy urine.Infections are usually treated with medications and changes to the diet, however in some cases of large stones or crystals surgery may be needed.

Male cats can also experience urinary blockage. This is due to a unique anatomical part or the urethra that forms a U-shape before exiting the body in male cats. If a cat has crystals or other debris in the urine, it can block at this point preventing urine from being able to exit. Cats may attempt to urinate without producing anything, may become very vocal (indicating pain) or may have a hunched back, full abdomen or pain in the abdomen (protecting the very full bladder). Urinary blockage IS a medical emergency so if suspected, your vet or local emergency clinic should be contacted immediately. Treatment usually involves a hospital stay and catheterization of the bladder to remove the blockage and allow urine to drain followed by medications and a change in diet to prevent further problems.

It is best to try and collect a sample of urine and make an appointment for your cat if he has had a change in urinary habits. If you do suspect a blockage, then contact your vet ASAP is best.

Q. Is neutering a good idea? What are the main aspects to consider?
ANSWER : A. Neutering is a procedure that surgically removes a dog’s testicles for the purpose of canine population control, certain medical health benefits, and behavioral modification.

There are several pros and cons to neutering. The positive aspects of neutering include the following:
1. Reduces the risk of prostate disorders, including prostate infections, prostate cysts, or enlarged prostate tissue. It also reduces the risk of testicular cancer, perineal hernias, and perianal fistulas.
2. Reduces the risk of dominance and aggression in many dogs due to a reduction in the amount of circulating testosterone.
3. Reduces the occurrence of sexual behaviors, such as humping, urine marking, or licking of genital regions.
4. Population control – neutering prevents dogs from creating more litters of puppies that need homes.

The following are possible issues to consider:
1. Neutering is a surgery that requires general anesthesia causing slight risks involved in placing an animal under sedation and anesthesia. Performing bloodwork prior to any anesthetic procedure can help decrease the risk of complications prior to surgery.
2. There is an increased risk of neutered dogs becoming prone to obesity because of a change in hormones and activity level.
3. Neutering your dog at too early of an age can have complications.

Overall, neutering is a good idea for your dog in order to prevent population overgrowth and specific medical issues that can result if your dog remains intact. Consult with your veterinarian on the details of surgery and any risk factors based on your dog’s age and breed.

The AVMA supports the concept of pediatric spay/neuter in dogs and cats in an effort to reduce the number of unwanted animals of these species. Just as for other veterinary medical and surgical procedures, veterinarians should use their best medical judgment in deciding at what age spay/neuter should be performed on individual animals.

Read Full Q/A … : Spay/Neuter Your Pet

Q. Whenever I take my dog on walks he always barks at people and others dogs in my neighborhood. What should I do to resolve the problem
ANSWER : A. The very first thing to do is to make sure your dog is getting sufficient physical and mental exercise every day. A tired dog is a good, happy dog and one who is less likely to bark from boredom or frustration. Depending on his breed, age, and health, your dog may require several long walks as well as a good game of chasing the ball and playing with some interactive toys.

Figure out what he gets out of barking and remove it. Don’t give your dog the opportunity to continue the barking behavior.

Ignore your dog’s barking for as long as it takes him to stop. That means don’t give him attention at all while he’s barking. Your attention only rewards him for being noisy. Don’t talk to, don’t touch, or even look at him. When he finally quiets, even to take a breath, reward him with a treat. To be successful with this method, you must wait as long as it takes for him to stop barking. Yelling at him is the equivalent of barking with him.

Get your dog accustomed to whatever causes him to bark. Start with whatever makes him bark at a distance. It must be far enough away that he doesn’t bark when he sees it. Feed him lots of good treats. Move the stimulus a little closer (perhaps as little as a few inches or a few feet to start) and feed treats. If the stimulus moves out of sight, stop giving your dog treats. You want your dog to learn that the appearance of the stimulus leads to good things.

Teach your dog the ‘quiet’ command. Oddly, the first step is to teach your dog to bark on command. Give your dog the command to “speak,” wait for him to bark two or three times, and then stick a tasty treat in front of his nose. When he stops barking to sniff the treat, praise him and give him the treat. Repeat until he starts barking as soon as you say “speak.” Once your dog can reliably bark on command, teach him the “quiet” command. In a calm environment with no distractions, tell him to “speak.” When he starts barking, say “quiet” and stick a treat in front of his nose. Praise him for being quiet and give him the treat.

As in all training, always end training on a good note, even if it is just for obeying something very simple, like the ‘sit’ command. If you dog regresses in training, go back to the last thing he did successfully and reinforce that before moving on again. Keep sessions short, 15-20 minutes max, and do this several times a day.

Q. Rescued a dog almost two weeks ago, and now that her kennel cough is gone her personality shines!! No previous training, how should I start?
ANSWER : A. POST FOUR:

After your dog is familiar with the behavior you lured from scratch, and taught to your dog, you can start to use the “no-reward marker” I talked about. What you do is ask the dog to perform the behavior, and if the dog does not perform the behavior, you simply say your no-reward marker (choose one: eh-eh, hey, uh-oh, oops) show them the treat, put it behind your back, and BRIEFLY ignore your dog. Just turn your back for a second or two, before turning back to your dog and saying, “let’s try that again.” When you’re ready to start over with your dog, make sure you move around. If you are repeating the same cue while in the same position, while your dog is in the same position, you are likely to receive the same results. The more you move around, and start fresh, the better your chances are of having your dog listen to your cue the second time around. BIG rewards when they dog it successfully! Lots of praise and treats.

My no-reward marker is “hey.” When my dog does something wrong I say, “hey” and she immediately understands that she needs to offer a different behavior. This is clear to her. I don’t have to say it in a mean way, I simply say, “hey” in a normal tone of voice and she understands what the word means.

Once you’ve built up that connection and communication with your new dog, you can work on all kinds of fun behaviors! I personally enjoy the more zen-like behaviors: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ruy9UMcuGh8

I like to teach my dog fun tricks that offer her a “job” to do of sorts like object retrieval: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I4iertZSva8

(object retrieval training completed; what it looks like: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jx0Dml28FGY)

Scent-games are fun too! Very confidence building. Hide a REALLY smelly treat in a box, and place that box in a line of boxes. Let your dog go in the room while saying something like “search!” or “find it!” and watch them hunt for that smelly treat! Lots of rewards when they find it!

Q. My female Schnauzer (spaded)has blood in her urine, I believe. Our male dog not neutered is trying to mount her. What could be the problem?
ANSWER : A. Blood can come from urinary tract but also from the vagina or remnants of the uterus. You should collect an urine sample and see a vet. It can be urinary tract disease but also ovarian remnant syndrome or infection of the vagina.