all this?

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. It could be that she is suffering from haemorrhagic gastro-enteritis which can start all of a sudden with a quite dramatic onset. You need to have her checked over as she can become stocky and deteriorate quite rapidly. She might need to be put on a drip. There are also other illnesses with the same symptoms but different causes, I am sure your vet will be able to help.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

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The presence of blood in vomit should always be taken seriously and may indicate a more serious condition, such as an ulcer or tumor. If your dog is experiencing vomiting, it is important to consult with a veterinarian as soon as possible to determine the cause and receive appropriate treatment.
Possible causes for bloody vomit or diarrhea in dogs include: Hemorrhagic gastroenteritis (HGE) (severe bloody diarrhea and bloody vomiting, caused by infectious agents) Stomach ulcers. Viral or bacterial infection.
Some of the signs of parvovirus include lethargy; loss of appetite; abdominal pain and bloating; fever or low body temperature (hypothermia); vomiting; and severe, often bloody, diarrhea. Persistent vomiting and diarrhea can cause rapid dehydration, and damage to the intestines and immune system can cause septic shock.
Your puppy will vomit and have diarrhea if canine parvovirus is present in their system. Vomit may be clear or a yellow or brown color, and diarrhea will often contain blood and be a light yellow or mustard colored hue.
Recovery of Vomiting of Blood in Dogs

Many conditions, especially those with only a small amount of blood can be treated easily and your dog will make a full recovery. Some conditions, like cancer, or liver and kidney disease, may require long-term management. Others can be immediately life threatening.

Bleeding tumors in the esophagus or stomach can make a dog feel nauseated and cause a dog to vomit blood. The problem could also lie outside the digestive system. Dogs that are suffering from severe liver disease, kidney disease or autoimmune disorders may vomit material that is blood tinged.
Can My Dog Die From Pooping Blood? Yes, if the loss of blood through the digestive tract is significant, or it`s combined with significant loss of fluid through vomiting or diarrhea, it can be life-threatening. Severe dehydration and loss of blood (leading to anemia) can lead to serious consequences for your pet.
Symptoms of Parvo

Your dog will not drink water nor eat, and very soon the pup will be stretched out and down on the ground, unable to get back up. They will become limp, weak, and unable to hold themselves up. Parvovirus, when left untreated, is often fatal. It requires veterinary oversight.

This illness is expensive to treat and ravages a dog`s body – symptoms often include severe vomiting and diarrhea. Some find that there is a distinct metallic smell to feces infected with parvovirus.
When puppies experience bloody diarrhea, it is possible they have contracted canine parvovirus, which is a potentially fatal viral disease. The consistency of stool along with the presence of bright red blood can also give some telltale signs of where the root problem is stemming from.
Dogs with parvovirus may vomit and have bloody diarrhea with abdominal pain. Often the diarrhea has an unusually offensive odor caused by blood in the stool. With parvo, intestinal bleeding occurs in the small intestine so that the blood is partially digested and passes out as black, tarry feces (melena).
Parvovirus (also known as Parvo) is a serious, highly contagious viral infection of dogs that causes vomiting and bloody diarrhea.
Recovery and Management of Sepsis in Dogs

Even with intensive care, the survival rate is typically around 50%. Most dogs can be discharged when they are fever-free and have normal heart rate and blood pressure. They may be on antibiotics for two to six weeks depending on the source and type of infection.

To help control external bleeding, place a compress of clean cloth or gauze directly over your dog or cat`s wound. Apply firm but gentle pressure, and allow it to clot. If blood soaks through the compress, place a fresh compress on top of the old one and continue to apply firm but gentle pressure.
Acute hemorrhagic diarrhea syndrome (AHDS), also known as hemorrhagic gastroenteritis (HGE), is an acute (sudden) disorder of dogs characterized by vomiting and bloody diarrhea. Some dogs may have a painful abdomen, decreased appetite, lethargy, or fever. Most cases occur without warning in otherwise healthy dogs.
Dogs can bleed to death within a few hours if the bleeding continues unchecked. They can be quite literally felled in their tracks. The bleeding is internal, and there is no evidence of bleeding that can be seen externally by the pet owner.
Contact your veterinarian if the blood continues or if your dog shows signs of being sick, like lethargy, vomiting, or diarrhea. If you are regularly or frequently seeing blood in your dog`s stool—whether it`s red or black—it`s important to contact your veterinarian.
If your dog is pooing blood you should always contact a vet to rule out anything serious and ensure they receive any necessary treatment. While in some cases blood in your dog`s stool can indicate something serious, there are also many milder causes which can be treated.
IV fluids and management of electrolytes are the cornerstone of treatment for parvo. Antibiotics are given to prevent secondary infections, along with medications to help relieve vomiting, nausea and pain. De-wormer should be given since many puppies also have intestinal parasites that can worsen diarrhea.
The survival rate for hospitalization is 90%. The survival rate for at-home care is 50%.
The parvo virus can also cause an inflammation of the heart muscle. The puppy cries, gasps for breath, stops nursing, and suddenly dies. This is most commonly seen in puppies less than eight weeks of age.
Parvo poop color

The poop should start a pale yellow and gradually become darker as more blood enters the intestines. Parvo poop can go from yellowish brown to dark red, to nearly black in the later stages.

Recovery: It can take fourteen to twenty days for a puppy or adult dog to fully recover from parvovirus. You need to make sure your dog is eating and drinking enough and that they remain isolated until they are no longer infectious.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My Jack Russell is vomiting profusely & has bright red blood coming out of her backside , she was well at 9:30am & came home @ 5:00. To find all this?
ANSWER : A. It could be that she is suffering from haemorrhagic gastro-enteritis which can start all of a sudden with a quite dramatic onset. You need to have her checked over as she can become stocky and deteriorate quite rapidly. She might need to be put on a drip. There are also other illnesses with the same symptoms but different causes, I am sure your vet will be able to help.

Q. We have a 4 yr old lab-pit mix we raise from 6 weeks.If my husband tries to take hin by the collar and make him go out to pottie he growls.Problem?
ANSWER : A. This is not good behavior. Rather than take him by the collar, call him to come with you. If he’s not good about coming when called, you can work on that. Keeps treats on hand to to entice him out and reward him when he does go potty and he’ll come to look forward to it. Clicker training is another great way to teach a dog all kinds of things, from obedience to tricks.

Have treats on hand that you know he loves, then simply click and treat. He will come to associate the sound with getting a treat. Start putting distance between you so he has to come to you. Call and click and when he comes to you for that treat, treat him and give him lots of praise. Move to hiding somewhere in the house, call and click. When he comes to you reliably inside when you call, click and treat. When this behavior is consistent, move outdoors with a very long leash. Call and click, if he doesn’t respond, give a light tug on the leash. If he takes even a single step toward you, click, treat and lots of praise. Keep doing this until he comes eagerly. Next, try him off-leash in a securely fenced area. Call and click. At this point he should be responding well and coming easily to the call and click. If he does not, go back to the last step he performed reliably and work on that again until he responds well. Eventually, you can start not treating him every time, but still praise him. Gradually lessen the frequency of the treats until he comes just to the click and praise.

Keep training sessions short, ten or fifteen minutes to start, no more than 30 minutes at a time and do it a few times a day. Try not to do it any time he is overly excited so that he can pay attention to you. Always end a training session on a good note, even if it is just getting him to do something he already does well on command. And never, NEVER punish a dog when they come to you, no matter how far they’ve made you chase them, no matter how frustrated and angry you might be. That teaches your dog that coming to you is a bad thing.

Read Full Q/A … : Causes of Limping in Dogs

Q. My puppy will be 8 weeks old tomorrow. I’ve had her for a week now, and she still isn’t responding to any training or her name. What can I do?
ANSWER : A. Try clicker training her to come when called. Clicker training is an effective way of training you dog to not only come when called, but can be used to teach a variety of tricks and tasks.

Have treats on hand that you know she loves, then simply click and treat. She will come to associate the sound with getting a treat. Start putting distance between you so she has to come to you. Call and click and when she comes to you for that treat, treat him and give her lots of praise. Move to hiding somewhere in the house, call and click. When she comes to you reliably inside when you call, click and treat. When this behavior is consistent, move outdoors with a very long leash. Call and click, if she doesn’t respond, give a light tug on the leash. If she takes even a single step toward you, click, treat and lots of praise. Keep doing this until she comes eagerly. Next, try her off-leash in a securely fenced area. Call and click. At this point she should be responding well and coming easily to the call and click. If she does not, go back to the last step she performed reliably and work on that again until she responds well. Eventually, you can start not treating her every time, but still praise her. Gradually lessen the frequency of the treats until she comes just to the click and praise.

Keep training sessions short, ten or fifteen minutes to start, no more than 30 minutes at a time and do it a few times a day. Try not to do it any time she is overly excited so that she can pay attention to you. Always end a training session on a good note, even if it is just getting him to do something she already does well on command. And never, NEVER punish a dog when they come to you, no matter how far they’ve made you chase them, no matter how frustrated and angry you might be. That teaches your dog that coming to you is a bad thing.

Q. Has not eaten in 2 days. Noticed a little blood on the fur on her butt. What can I do?
ANSWER : A. Blood near the rear can be caused by a number of things. Bright red blood in the stool or around the anus can indicate a problem with the colon or anal region such as constipation, tears, illness or problems with the anal glands.

Blood that is dark or black in the stool can indicate a problem with the upper intestines such as the stomach or small intestine. This is usually considered more serious than bright red stool, however any blood seen is cause for concern. If the blood is seen more than once or twice, making a vet appointment is a must.

If your dog is not eating and is having blood in either her stool or vomit, making an appointment with your local vet is best. Illness, digestive upset or problems with internal organs can all cause these symptoms. In the mean time, a bland diet of plain boiled chicken and plain white rice may help to soothe minor digestive upset until you can get into the vet.

Q. Which common foods are poisonous to pets?
ANSWER : A. That’s a great question. As responsible pet owners we need to be aware of food items that can be harmful to our canine or feline companions. Here are some of the most common foods proven to cause illness in our animals at home:

Chocolate: A favorite and irresistible treat amongst most humans, chocolate is considered toxic to dogs. In very small amounts it is usually not a huge issue, but with larger volumes and with darker chocolates pet owners should be concerned. Chocolate contains methylxanthine theobromine, which is similar to caffeine. Chocolate ingestion can cause vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity, issues with normal heartbeats, seizures, and in some severe cases, death. It is best to keep your favorite chocolate treats in a good hiding spot and out of reach of your dog or cat.

Grapes and raisins: Dogs should not consume grapes and raisins because of the risk of acute kidney failure. Most dogs experiencing grape or raisin toxicity will begin to have vomiting and/or diarrhea within 6-12 hours of ingestion. Other abnormal clinical signs include lethargy, abdominal pain, dehydration, and tremors. Kidney failure develops within 24-72 hours of the initial ingestion. There are some dogs that do not experience these devastating side effects. It is best to contact your veterinarian or veterinary emergency facility if you believe your pet has ingested grapes or raisins.

Garlic and onions: We often forget that our meals contain these two popular ingredients and will allow our furry companions a few bites or licks. Onion and garlic both can cause a type of poisoning that results in damage to red blood cells, making them more likely to rupture. They can also cause stomach upset and mouth irritation. Look for pale gums, increased breathing or drooling or any vomiting or diarrhea.

Bread dough: Unbaked bread dough is considered poisonous to our pets. The bread dough, when ingested, expands in the stomach because of the warm and moist environment. This can lead to a bloated or even twisted stomach. In addition yeast is often added to our baking products to help get bread to rise, and when this yeast is fermented it produces both carbon dioxide and alcohol. The alcohol produced can be absorbed into the bloodstream and causes dangerous drops in blood sugar, blood pressure and body temperature. Common clinical signs include vomiting or retching, distension of the stomach, weakness and collapse.

Macadamia nuts: Ingestion of these nuts are not proven to be fatal in dogs but can cause them to experience uncomfortable clinical sings, including fever, joint stiffness, vomiting, tremors and difficulty walking, especially in their hind legs. Often your pet will start to feel better after about 48 hours, but supportive veterinary care (such as pain medication) may help ease their discomfort.

Xylitol: The most common ingredient used in sugar-free gum is xylitol, which is a non-caloric sweetener. It is also found in some oral rinses, toothpastes and vitamins. Xylitol and dogs do not mix – it can cause a dangerous drop in blood sugars levels. Dogs will often display signs of disorientation, black tarry stool, tremors and seizures. If severe enough some dogs have developed liver failure. Keep your gum away from your canine companion.

Avocados: Avocados are not actually poisonous to dogs or cats but as many veterinarians can tell you the avocado pits can cause a foreign body obstruction. Avocados contain persin, which is actually toxic to the majority of pet birds. The abnormal clinical signs associated with avocado ingestion in birds include, respiratory distress, inability to perch, liver and kidney failure and sudden death.

Go forth and enjoy your favorite foods, but keep in mind which foods you should avoid sharing with your furry family members. Whenever in doubt, contact your veterinarian for healthy and safe food suggestions.

Q. How do I determine how much my overweight pet should weigh?
ANSWER : A. There are many tools to determine overweight and obesity levels in pets. A new tool, morphometric measurements and body fat index, are available to accurately determine a pet’s ideal weight; this will allow an accurate determination of the amount of food a pet should receive to achieve weight loss. Feeding the correct amount will lead to greater weight loss success.

There are many weight loss food options to help pets reach their ideal weight. Your veterinarian can help make a ideal weight recommendation. Here are some tips to help your dog lose weight in a healthy and safe way:

1. Diet: Providing a healthy and well balanced diet is essential to your pet’s overall health. Finding the right food for your dog can be a challenging process. For those overweight animals many commercial dog companies offer weight loss diets, but it is important to evaluate food labels for adequate nutritional content.

You want to ensure you are not missing other essential vitamin or mineral content. Volume of food is also important and the amount of food that works for one breed of dog may not be the same for another breed of dog. Portion control as opposed to free-choice feeding can help your dog to drop a few unnecessary pounds.

There are also prescription weight loss foods designed by veterinary nutritionists, such as Hill’s r/d (http://bit.ly/1AoENSd). Some pet owners find that home cooking is the best option for helping to provide a well-balanced and realistic diet plan. There are websites such as balanceit.com that offers recipes to fit your dog’s specific needs. Consulting with your veterinarian or a veterinary nutritionist to find the appropriate diet is a great way to help your dog be as healthy as possible.

2. Exercise: Another great tactic for weight loss for your dog is exercise. Whether this is through running, walking or playing with a favorite toy all of these are wonderful types of exercise to help keep your dog at a lean and healthy weight.

For those pet owners with busy schedules utilizing professional dog walking services or playtime through dog daycare services is another option. It has been shown that those pet owners that exercise regularly with their pets generally live a healthier lifestyle.

3. Physical therapy: As animals age pet owners offer encounter their favorite canine having more difficulty walking and have a dwindling desire to play with toys. Physical therapy, specifically hydrotherapy is a wonderful way to help older and arthritic animals gain more mobility and lose weight. Hydrotherapy has been proven to have several therapeutic effects on the body including, muscle strengthening, relief of swelling, decreased joint pain, less stiffness in limbs, improved circulation, weight loss, and increased tissue healing to name a few. For more information on the benefits of hydrotherapy:
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4. Veterinary visit and blood work: Weight gain can also be related to underlying health concerns such as hypothyroidism or other endocrine disorders. Scheduling a veterinary evaluation and routine blood work can be another important component in increasing the longevity of your dog’s life. Conditions such as hypothyroidism that predispose dogs to gain weight can be treated with a daily medication to improve hormonal balance. If feel that your dog is unnecessarily overweight there can be an underlying health condition that needs to be addressed.

5. Healthy treats: Pet owners love the chance to reward their favorite canine companion with treats and most dogs jump at the chance to consume these delicious products. The problem is many treats, which can include commercial dog treats or table scrapes can add many unnecessary calories to your dog’s daily intake. Reading labels and making note of the calories in these treats is an important component of understanding your dog’s overall health. Treats should not exceed more than 10 percent of your pet’s daily calories. There are healthier treats that can be offered to your pet to keep calories lower yet provide a fuller sensation. A pet owner can add steamed or pureed vegetables, such as carrots, green beans or sweet potato to add more fiber and thus a fuller feeling for your dog.

Q. My cat of 15 years male was diagnose with hyperthyroidism started coughing tonight for about 10 minutes an then stopped.
ANSWER : A. If your cat is vomiting there could be several underlying causes. I guess the first thing I would want to check is the thyroid level, since I have definitely seen cats that were at one point “controlled” on a specific dose of medication no longer be controlled, and the dosage has to be adjusted. This is why we always recommend rechecking thyroid levels yearly, even in hyperthyroid cats that are clinically doing well.

If the thyroid levels have recently been checked and are stable, then I’d start looking for other causes, such as GI disease. Other possibilities include kidney disease, which can definitely cause vomiting and typically goes along with hyperthyroidism (as well as just being a geriatric cat). Always a good idea to check liver values as well, as liver disease is a common problem in older cats too.

So since your cat is hyperthyroid the first step to diagnosing causes of vomiting is running full blood work – complete blood count, chemistry panel, and urinalysis – to look for some of the things I mentioned above. If nothing turns up, imaging with x-rays or ultrasound or both will likely provide a lot more information. Good luck.

Q. My dog is constantly vomiting
ANSWER : A. If your dog is vomiting excessively 5-6 times or more, is vomiting blood, very lethargic, straining to pass faeces then you should see your vet as soon as possible as apart from the problem causing the vomiting I would also be concerned about dehydration now which can also be serious. If it is only a couple of vomiting episodes and is otherwise well you can try starving for 12 hours and then gradually reintroduce a bland diet such as chicken and rice. If the vomiting continues despite starving then see your vet.