Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. It can be cat flu. If it’s the only symptom, discharge is watery and your cat feels fine there is nothing to worry. see a vet if you will notice thick, white or yellow discharge, conjunctivitis, weakness, loss of appetite.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

If your cat is sneezing more than normal, it`s more than likely that your feline friend has an upper respiratory infection or URI. The most widespread respiratory infection is Feline Herpesvirus or FHV. It`s estimated that as many as 80-90% of all cats are infected with FHV.
If your cat sneezes occasionally, there`s probably no reason to worry. However, if the sneezing persists or is accompanied by other cold-like symptoms in cats (such as coughing, loss of appetite, runny nose, watery eyes, etc.), it`s best to have your kitten examined by a vet.
A cat with allergies or a cold may start to sneeze, and cats can be infected with viruses, pathogens, and bacteria that can all cause these problems. If your cat is sneezing a lot for several days or if she shows other signs of being sick, you should take her to the veterinarian to be examined.
If you notice that your kitten is sneezing a lot, he may need veterinary attention and intervention. Coughing and sneezing are often signs of upper respiratory infections, but can be caused by other issues. With some supportive care at home and help from your veterinarian, your kitten will be on the mend soon.
Respiratory infections, vaccines, allergies, and nasal blockages may cause more frequent sneezing. If your cat keeps sneezing multiple times in a row or for several days, it`s best to call a vet.
If you do notice you sneeze more frequently, you may have an allergy that you are unaware of or inflammation of the nasal cavity called chronic rhinitis. It doesn`t hurt to talk to your doctor about your sneezing habits if you think they are abnormal.
If your cat only sneezes a few times and there doesn`t seem to be any other symptoms, then it may just be a tickle. This can be caused by dust, pollen, or even their own fur. There is nothing serious about a nose tickle.
URI is rarely fatal and usually resolves in one to three weeks. Treatment generally consists of supportive care. In addition, antibiotics are sometimes given to treat possible bacterial infections.
Can cats get a cold? Yes! Cat colds are upper respiratory infections characterized by all the same symptoms as the human cold. If your feline friend is sneezing or has a runny nose there`s a good chance they have a cat cold.
Allergies are a Very Common Cause of Sneezing in Cats

Some other common signs of allergies in cats include things like a runny nose, tearing eyes, and itchy and red skin. Your cat may excessively lick or scratch these itchy areas, especially around their face, paws, and bellies.

A sneeze here and there from your cat is normal and nothing to worry about. You may even notice your cat has a sneezing fit and sneezes multiple times in a row, which is also standard. What isn`t normal is if your cat is sneezing several times a day and for several days in a row.
Typical signs include conjunctivitis, ocular discharge, sneezing, nasal discharge, salivation, pharyngitis, lethargy, inappetence, fever and sometimes coughing. Signs may last from a few days to a few weeks and shedding of virus typically continues for around 3 weeks.
Risk Factors for Upper Respiratory Infection in Cats. There are several risk factors that increase a cat`s chances of contracting an upper respiratory infection. Kittens and senior cats with less robust immune systems, are more prone to catching URIs.
Generally, URI is not contagious to healthy people nor to other animals.
In most cases, cat colds are harmless and will go away within 1-2 weeks. You do need to monitor their health, however, and if there is no sign of improvement by the fourth day, you should make an appointment with your vet as a persisting cold that does not get treated properly may develop into pneumonia.
Experts agree that outdoor temperatures under 32 degrees Fahrenheit (0 degrees Celsius) can pose a danger to cats if they do not have access to a suitable shelter. When temperatures drop below freezing, cats can be at risk for hypothermia and frostbite, both of which are life-threatening conditions.
Sneezing can be due to: Allergy to pollen (hay fever), mold, dander, dust. Breathing in corticosteroids or other medicines (from certain nose sprays) Common cold or the flu.
The results showed that more than 95% of the normal persons sneezed and blew the nose less than 4 times a day, on average. It is concluded that it is normal to sneeze and blow the nose less than 4 times daily while a higher number can be a sign of rhinitis.
It is theorized that we sneeze multiple times in order to adequately remove the stimulus for the sneeze, so sometimes more than one sneeze is needed to expel it. However, it is not a bad thing as long as it is a few sneezes in a row without frequent sneezing attacks.
Respiratory Infections Are the Primary Cause of Sneezing

Cats do not get infections from you, nor are their infections passed on to you.

An occasional sneeze in a cat is normal and no real cause for alarm. Just as in humans, sneezing in cats is an explosive release of air through the nose and mouth – often the body`s response to irritants in the nasal passages. Sometimes, excitement or movement can bring on sneezing in cats.
Some cats may also be left with permanent damage within the nose and may have persistent or recurrent nasal discharge (so-called `chronic rhinitis`). In rare cases, a much more severe and often fatal form of FCV infection may occur.
Feline Upper Respiratory Infection Causes

By far, viruses are the most common causes of upper respiratory infections in cats. About 80%- 90% of infections are viral, while most of the rest are caused by bacteria. The most common culprits often show up in shelters and multi-cat households: Feline herpesvirus.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My kitten has been sneezing at various times for the past few days. Yesterday we counted a total of 8 sneezes. Should I be worried?
ANSWER : A. It can be cat flu. If it’s the only symptom, discharge is watery and your cat feels fine there is nothing to worry. see a vet if you will notice thick, white or yellow discharge, conjunctivitis, weakness, loss of appetite.

Q. I have a 1yr old male 38 lb Labradoodle and my gf just brought a month old kitten home. Can they interact? If not, for how long?
ANSWER : A. Interactions whenever a new pet is brought into the house should start off slow, then can be increased in time. The best steps when introducing a new cat is to allow your cat or kitten to have a room in the house all to him or herself. Allow your dog to sniff under the door to get used to the kitten’s scent, and even show your dog articles such as bedding the cat has slept on. After a few days, an introduction with your dog on leash, or a barrier such as a gate where both pets can look at each other but not see each other is best. This will allow each to get used to seeing the other without the ability to jump, bite or scratch the other. Once the two are used to this, then a face to face interaction can begin. If at any time a fight or scuffle breaks out, separate the two pets and try again at a later time. The amount of time this introduction takes can vary depending on how the two react to each other.

Until your kitten is older, or you are sure both are fine together, do not leave the two pets together unattended. Even a well-meaning and playful dog can accidentally break a leg of a kitten or worse without meaning to! A safe room for your kitten to be in while you are away, or a barrier to allow your kitten to escape to safety if needed will help until both are big enough to play alone safely.

Read Full Q/A … : Dogs and Jealousy

Q. How can I keep my 14 year old Yorkie from snapping at the younger ones?
ANSWER : A. It’s all about management. Do not allow the 7yo’s to interact with your 14yo unsupervised. You should be there each time they interact so you can redirect the 14yo’s attention onto some toys, or onto some treats when the 7yo’s are around. It sounds like you need to help your 14yo make positive associations with being around the younger pups. You should be trying to feed him treats each time he interacts with them, and doesn’t snap at them. Pet and praise him each time he is around them, or any time they are near. As I said, keep the separated when you cannot supervise their interactions because if you aren’t around when he is snapping at them, you could end up with a fight on your hands.

It could also be that they spend too much time together. Imagine spending 100% of your time with somebody, day in and out, doing everything together… including going to the bathroom.. that might bother anybody. I think you should give them more time apart from each other. Take them all on separate walks, separate them to play with them individually, separate them when you take them to potty, separate feeding times in separate rooms, etc. This can help alleviate the stress your older dog is feeling due to living closely with other dogs. You should always be giving individual activities in a houseful of dogs anyway.. when you expect them to get along 100% of the time, that’s when you find trouble.

Q. We brought 2 new kittens home. One of them is sneezing. We have a Sr cat and an adult who is now coughing. What to do?
ANSWER : A. Commonly respiratory infections (viral -Herpesvirus and Calicivirus- and possibly bacterial) can cause sneezing episodes in kitten especially if not vaccinated yet. If your kitten is affected by respiratory infection could develop or have more signs such as discharge from eyes, more discharge from nose, coughing, being lethargic, depressed and inappetent.

The coughing episodes of the adult cat could be completely unrelated to the cause of sneezing of your new kitten, especially if your adult cat is already vaccinated.

The cause of cough in adult cats are not necessarily related to respiratory problems, heart problems could cause that as well.

Keep the nose and the eyes of your kitten free from discharge, keep your kitten warm and take both of them to your veterinarian as soon as possible to identify the cause and the relationship of the two problems and treat appropriately.

Q. i believe my cat is pregnant but showing signs of being in heat
ANSWER : A. Cats are induced ovulators, meaning they will continue to go into heat until they are bred, or spayed (reproductive organs removed). If your cat is showing signs of being in heat (excessive yowling, presenting her rear to you for inspection, attempting to get out or other cats hanging near your house) and you don’t want kittens, it is best to have her spayed. Most cats are also semi-seasonal in their heat cycle meaning they will more likely be in heat through Spring-Summer than in Fall-Winter.

Pregnancy in cats lasts about 60 days. Signs of pregnancy may include weight gain, increased appetite, nipples that become pronounced or “leak” and seeking nesting areas to deliver kittens. If you saw that your cat was in heat, or had her mated, you can use the date she was bred to determine when she may be due for kittens. Your local vet can help determine if she is indeed pregnant and can also take an X-ray to determine the number of kittens present if your cat is nearing her due date. Be sure to feed mom a kitten formula in the last few weeks of her pregnancy and during nursing as it will help provide extra beneficial nutrients for both mom and babies.

If you do not want kittens, some very early term pregnancies can be aborted with spaying, otherwise spaying mom is usually done when kittens are weaned from their mom.

Q. I recently added a new 2 month old female kitten to my house and my male 5 month the old kitten has turned aggressive and chases the kitten down..
ANSWER : A. It is possible it could be play behavior but without seeing it in person, hard to say. Is the male kitten neutered? You may want to consider doing so. Also, try re-introducing the kittens slowly by creating a safe space for the new kitten behind a closed door in a room. Keep her there for at least a week so she is protected but your male is still able to smell her. After a week or 2, you can then graduate to using a baby gate so they can then not only smell each other but safely see each other as well. If that is going okay, after another few days you can bring the gate down. Also, be sure to have feeding bowls in separate locations and at least 2 litter boxes.

Read Full Q/A … : Ragdoll Cats

Q. Need help, we have done flea bath ,sprayed the house and used charts ultra guard pro and still have fleas .how can we get rid of them
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Q. I’m almost positive my dog is afraid of the dark! Every time I turn off the light she starts crying! Is there a way I can teach her not to be afraid
ANSWER : A. You may need to take things very slowly. First off, you should consider using a night light in the room you have your dog in. I have a night light in my room for my dog, even though I don’t feel the need to use one. You should have a handful of treats, and toss several of them to your dog. While your dog is eating the treats, shut off the light, and then turn it back on and toss several more treats to your dog. While your dog is eating the treats, turn off the light and count to three, then turn it back on. Toss several more treats to your dog, turn off the light and count to five. Turn the light back on, toss several more treats to your dog, shut off the light, count to four. Turn on the light, toss treats, turn off light, count to eight. Turn on light, toss treats, turn off light, count to five. The key is to randomly increase and decrease the amount of time the pup is in the dark. Work on it slowly, slowly build duration. Do not expect it to happen all in one session.