till thin

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Hair regrowth takes 6-8weeks; a good quality kitten food supplemented with a cat suitable fatty acid supplement will encourage a full, healthy coat. It is important to also treat all sleeping areas and the house if kittens brought fleas in because only 5-10% of the flea cycle are actually present on cats/dogs with the rest being eggs/larva/pupae which can slowly hatch and continue to re-infest pets over time

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Some topically applied flea medications cause hair loss at the area of application. Injected vaccines cause hair loss at the injection site and in some pets there is further widespread hair loss over the next few months.
Most of the time, it is nothing to be concerned about, but it is still recommended to take your feline friend to a vet for a general health checkup. Reasons your cat may be losing hair could be a poor diet, allergies, fleas and ticks, stress, or even hypothyroidism.
Fortunately, the problem is usually fairly easy to treat, and the hair will grow back as soon as the fleas or mites are gone. This condition is best treated with products such as `spot-ons` to eliminate the external parasites.
Alopecia can result from a variety of medical conditions, including skin infections, hormonal diseases, and infestations with fleas or mites. Many causes of alopecia are treatable. If the hair follicle has not been permanently damaged or destroyed, the hair will grow back over time.
Hair loss from infection or infestation can be caused by ringworm fungus, mange mites, fleas, parasites, ticks, and bacteria. In fact, fleas and mites are oftentimes the most common culprits behind hair loss and allergic reactions.
Bald spots on cats typically grow back after the underlying cause is addressed. For shorthaired cats, hair may grow back in a matter of weeks, but it may take several months for other cats.
The collar could be too tight,” Maureen Kanana Murithi, DVM, a veterinary spokesperson for Hepper, told POPSUGAR. “Every time the cat turns, the collar rubs against the skin, causing friction and stretching it out.” All that rubbing can break off your cat`s hairs at the skin level.
Give Your Pet a Bath

One of the first solutions to get rid of fleas is to bathe your pet. Just lukewarm water, or water and a mild soap, can help get fleas off your pet`s fur and skin. The dish soap can help to drown adult fleas.

It can take up to 24 hours for fleas on your cat to die, although it might occur much quicker. Fleas typically die faster than ticks, since they are a much less robust parasite. Ticks can take up to 48 hours for treatment to work. Oral flea medications tend to work a bit faster in cats than topical medications.
Getting rid of fleas is a difficult process due to the long lifecycle of a flea. Moderate to severe infestations will take months to control and require a four-step process for complete elimination: Sanitation. Thoroughly clean areas where fleas frequently breed.
Without a host like a cat or a dog, fleas can live anywhere between a few days and two weeks, but they can lay eggs that make the infestation last longer. When female fleas get a source of blood to feed on, they lay eggs and can lay up to 27 eggs per day.
You might be asking yourself will fleas eventually go away? While some could last 2 – 3 weeks, they could also live for up to 12 months on the host it finds, so it is unlikely they will go away on their own. Fleas can also reproduce very quickly by laying eggs in carpet, bedding, or garden prolonging the infestation.
Do fleas like to live in human hair? No—they don`t. That means you can stop worrying about whether you`ll catch fleas from your cat or dog. While their infestation may be annoying, you don`t have to worry about catching the fleas.
Depending on the cause, your cat`s hair loss can often be a temporary problem when proper treatment is administered. Many conditions, including skin diseases like ringworm, can be healed and result in the regrowth of your cat`s fur. 2 In other cases, your cat`s fur may never grow fully again.
Alison Thomas, Head of Veterinary Services at Blue Cross, said: “Shaving a cat to get rid of fleas is very unlikely to be successful and there is a risk of causing trauma and even cuts to the skin when attempting this in the home setting.
You`d be right – kittens don`t shed much fur until they start to move in adulthood, at around 6 to 12 months. At this age, their kitten coat, which is normally a bit shorter and fluffier than their adult one, starts to fall away so the adult one can grow in.
Gently massage your pet with a solution of one part cat shampoo (human shampoo can dry out her skin) to five parts water, working from head to tail, in the direction of hair growth. Take care to avoid the face, ears and eyes.
In addition, an affected cat may have numerous small scabs around the head and neck. These scabs are often referred to as miliary dermatitis, a term coined because the scabs look like millet seeds (see handout “Miliary Dermatitis in Cats” for more information on this skin condition).
If your cat is allergic to fleas, they will develop intense itching and a rash every time they are bitten. A rash, hair loss, constant scratching, and skin infections are all common symptoms of a flea allergy. Flea allergic dermatitis can develop at any point throughout your cat`s life.
In many cases the chemicals used in the collars are not only toxic to your cat or dog but are also causing issues such as chemical burns and hair loss around the neck of pets.
As useful as collars can be, unfortunately they can sometime lead to injuries. If a collar rubs your cat`s neck, it can cause hair loss. Also, longstanding collar use can suppress your cat`s hair growth permanently. During grooming, or when trying to remove a collar, cats can trap their jaw.
Are flea allergy dermatitis home remedies available? Bathing your cat in cool or lukewarm water or with mild oatmeal shampoo may help soothe the skin. If your cat`s skin is ulcerated or has scratches, it is best not to bathe them.
Bathing your pet with a flea treatment shampoo kills fleas on them at the time of bathing, so they`ll be at risk of re-infestation after the shampoo has been rinsed away. Flea shampoos are a great way to kill fleas on your pet quickly, but be sure to follow your pet`s bath with a longer-term preventive flea treatment.
Giving Your Kitten a Bath: Bathing your kitten is another pretty safe and effective option to help your kitten get rid of fleas. Follow these safety tips: Don`t bathe your kitten more than twice a week. Frequent bathing can be damaging to their skin.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My cat is excessively scrstching herself., to the point she has sores. She is strictly an indoor cat. Did have flees been treated for 2 months
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. Need help, we have done flea bath ,sprayed the house and used charts ultra guard pro and still have fleas .how can we get rid of them
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Q. My kittens had fleas & lost some hair on their Neck/shoulders. I killed fleas with a spray but the hair still isn’t growing back in, it is still thin
ANSWER : A. Hair regrowth takes 6-8weeks; a good quality kitten food supplemented with a cat suitable fatty acid supplement will encourage a full, healthy coat. It is important to also treat all sleeping areas and the house if kittens brought fleas in because only 5-10% of the flea cycle are actually present on cats/dogs with the rest being eggs/larva/pupae which can slowly hatch and continue to re-infest pets over time

Q. My 13 year old male cat is acting lethargic & doesn’t seem to be feeling well. I don’t know what’s wrong except that he has fleas. Can too many fleas
ANSWER : A. Excessive fleas can cause anemia in cats, left untreated, this can be life-threatening. I recommend getting your cat seen by your vet right away for his illness. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard, since fleas will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Q. How do I FINALLY rid all 4 of my cats of tapeworms after 2 years of dealing with it? Fleas seem to be controlled. I know they are the vector.
ANSWER : A. If your cats keep getting tapeworms, then they are picking up fleas from somewhere. Fleas will hitch a ride on your pant leg from outside.

Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

You can also use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the life cycle.

Q. I have a pregnant cat and in a couple of weeks my house is getting sprayed to get rid of fleas. But can I put a flea collar on her?
ANSWER : A. It is best NOT to place a flea collar on a pregnant cat as they can cause problems such as deformities or breathing issues to the unborn kittens. If your cat has fleas you may want to check with your vet to see if there is a pregnancy-safe flea product that can be applied, or you may want to use a safe soap such as Dawn to bathe your cat and then use a fine-toothed comb to brush out the dead fleas. Dawn dish soap is very safe on the body and is often used on kittens that are too young for flea medication to suffocate and kill fleas on the body. Cleaning the environment is also a great way to get rid of the fleas, however be sure to keep your cat away from the area that is sprayed if chemicals are used to prevent injury to her or her unborn kittens.

Q. Year 3 my dog loses patches of hair on back, stomach and neck. Vet has tested, but has not found anything. Patches are a red and scaly by hair lin
ANSWER : A. Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. Our cat developed a flea allergy in the form of red sores above the eyes Our vet gave him an antibiotic shot and a flea collar but they remain.
ANSWER : A. I’m so sorry to hear! Flea allergies are tough to deal with! Unfortunately when a pet has an allergy to fleas, the problem lies in the flea bite. The actual allergy lies in the flea saliva, so what we really need to prevent is the flea biting our pet! I would recommend a product that can kill the flea before they even have a chance to bite your pet! A couple of really great products on the market right now are Frontline Plus and Revolution. Both are liquid topical products that you place on the skin of your pet once a month. They work by using the skins oils to spread themselves around the body and rest in the hair follicles. Each has a slightly different mechanism of use, but they both work to kill the flea before it actually has a chance to do harm to your cat. Flea collars simply are not as effective. I would also recommend treating your home environment, such as the area where the cat sleeps and the carpets inside your home. Flea eggs and larva can live for a very long time in these environments and unless we treat all of these areas, the problem will remain. I hope this was helpful! Good luck and I hope your kitty feels better!