Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Recovery typically takes several months. This time may be shortened with the addition of physical therapy and a strict recovery plan.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

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Dogs may take up to four months to fully recover from cruciate surgery. The first six post-operative weeks require the greatest degree of restriction in the dogs` activity levels.
Your pet must be strictly rested for the first six weeks following cruciate ligament surgery. This means: Your pet should be confined to a small room or quiet area for the six-week rest period. Only short (maximum 10 minutes) exercise is allowed – your pet may be slow walked on a leash in order to go to the toilet.
The success rate with surgery is about 90% (meaning that most dogs return to good or excellent function following surgery and proper post-operative care).
The answer to this question is both a yes and a no. Although your dog can live with cruciate ligament damage, its knees are not as healthy as yours. They can worsen over time and cause more health complications to the dog.
Dog ACL Surgery Recovery

Whichever treatment you choose for your dog recovery from an ACL injury is a long process. Expect your dog to require 16 weeks or longer to return to normal functioning. About a year after surgery your dog should be running and jumping like their old self again.

It is not necessary to stay up, or sleep next to your pet and you can leave your dog alone after surgery for short periods as long as they aren`t likely to lick their stitches. In fact, many dogs will appreciate some quiet time and the opportunity to sleep after the anaesthetic.
Your dog`s exercise should be restricted and supervised for around 8 to 12 weeks after surgery. This typically means short leash walks (the short here refers to the length of the leash not the time), limiting play with other animals, and confining the dog to a crate or small room when not supervised.
A cruciate ligament rupture is usually extremely painful and the knee joint becomes unstable, resulting in lameness. A more chronic form of cruciate damage occurs due to progressive weakening of the ligaments as a result of repeated trauma or arthritic disease.
Begin to increase the length of walks to no more than five to ten minutes, monitor closely the uninjured hind leg to ensure that it is not overly compensating for the injured one. Continue to keep your dog on a leash, and walk slowly, there should not be any running at this point.
As previously stated, dogs do have a slight risk of developing an isolated meniscal injury in the future, requiring re-exploration of the joint. This can occur with either the lateral suture technique or the TTA and it is not possible to predict which dogs will be affected.
Can my dog re-tear the cruciate ligament after surgery? No. Since we are not replacing the CCL, it cannot be torn. Likewise, once complete healing is obtained (about 6 months), the implants are not at much risk of breaking or moving.
The most common reason your dog is not peeing after surgery, spaying, or neutering is often due to a reduced intake of water and pain or tenderness in the groin area. Your dog may also be reluctant to pee if they`ve had orthopedic surgery or a procedure that affects their mobility.
Stairs should be limited to a short flight for the first 2 – 4 weeks following surgery. Longer flights of stairs should not be used for strength training your dog`s knee after surgery, but they are permitted with supervision after 4 weeks post-surgery.
Generally, it is advised that dogs should avoid jumping and high-impact activities for at least 12 weeks after TPLO surgery. This is because the surgery involves cutting and repositioning the bone, and it takes time for the bone to heal and for the surrounding tissue to stabilize the joint.
In fact, it`s actually quite normal for a dog to cry throughout the night post ACL surgery. This is due to the effects of anesthesia, which can last up to 24 hours for most dogs, and up to 72 hours in some cases.
For most procedures, your dog`s activity should be restricted for one week after surgery. It is essential to avoid running, jumping, and other strenuous activities that could cause excessive strain on the wound.
After the first six weeks, take your dog on a two-block walk. If your pup responds well, increase the walk`s duration by a half of a block every few days. Walks around weeks 9 and 10 post-operation can be any duration your dog feels comfortable with.
A: Many dogs will not have a bowel movement for the first 3-4 days after anesthesia and surgery. This is normal as long as there is no straining to attempt defecation.
Although drinking before surgery isn`t as bad as eating before surgery, your pet should avoid drinking water for at least 2 hours before the procedure. If your pet drinks water during the fasting period before surgery, you need to tell your vet, including how much water was consumed.
Bowel movements: Your companion may not have a bowel movement for the next 4 days after surgery. If your companion does not have a bowel movement after 4 days or is straining to defecate, constipation may be present.
Confine your dog in a small room

It can be a fenced area, dog crate, laundry room, or any area spacious enough to allow your dog to have free but limited movement. You should also place a water bowl in this area to keep your dog from getting dehydrated. Consider arranging an area in your house that is near a window.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My Labrador is facing took surgery for a torn cruciate ligament tear. How long is recovery expected to take.
ANSWER : A. Recovery typically takes several months. This time may be shortened with the addition of physical therapy and a strict recovery plan.

Q. My dog has a split nail, what should I do?
ANSWER : A. Split or torn nails are very common in dogs, and treatment depends on the level of the tear. If the nail is split above the quik (blood supply to the nail) then it can be safely trimmed back and the torn part removed. You can find the quik in a dog’s nails by looking for a red or pink line in light colored nails, or a darker groove on the underside of dark colored nails.

If the tear is behind the quik or the nail is bleeding, stopping the bleeding with styptic powder or starches such as corn or rice starch can help. It is then best to bring your dog into your local vet to have the nail safely trimmed back. This may require anesthesia or sedation depending on the size of the tear to make the experience less painful for your dog. Your vet may also recommend antibiotics if the tear is large to prevent infection from taking hold until the nail can heal.

Once the torn part of the nail is removed, the nail should be able to begin growing back as normal. Regular nail trims to keep nails short and in shape can also help to prevent tears and splits in the future.

Q. I have a 13 yr old Cocker Spaniel who tore a ligament in back leg. She is blind in one eye and deaf. Should she go through surgery?
ANSWER : A. You need to be guided by your vet. The age needs to be taken into account and I would want liver and kidney blood tests done prior to surgery to ensure they are functioning properly. Also I would expect her to be on iv fluids during the surgery. Recovery can be longer in older dogs too after a general anaesthetic. You should discuss in detail the quality of life and general health of the dog as to wether it is worth putting her through surgery. She is probably too big to be left without surgery so there are really only the two options.

Q. My elderley cross Jack russell x border Terrier has torn his cruciate ligament on his stifle joint (left hind leg). He is 14 years old .
ANSWER : A. Torn cruciate ligament is a surgical condition. However, small dogs which are not suitable for surgery for various reasons (for example advanced age or concurrent diseases) can do well on long term anti-inflammatory medications only. It also depends how unstable is the stifle. You should talk to your vets about these two options and decide which one will be best for your dog.

Q. What can I do to stop my dog from barking at people and front doors?
ANSWER : A. Ignore your dog’s barking for as long as it takes him to stop. This means don’t give him any attention at all while he’s barking. Your attention only rewards him for being noisy. Don’t talk to him, don’t touch him, and don’t even look at him. When he finally quiets down, even to take a breath, reward him with a treat. To be successful with this method, you must wait as long as it takes for him to stop barking. If he barks for an hour and you finally get so frustrated that you yell at him to be quiet, the next time he’ll probably bark for an hour and a half. Dogs learns that if they bark long enough you’ll give them attention.

Teach your dog the ‘quiet’ command. It may sound nonsensical, but the first step is to teach your dog to bark on command. Give your dog the command to “speak,” wait for him to bark two or three times, and then stick a tasty treat in front of his nose. When he stops barking to sniff the treat, praise him and give him the treat. Repeat until he starts barking as soon as you say “speak.” Once your dog can reliably bark on command, teach him the “quiet” command. In a calm environment with no distractions, tell him to “speak.” When he starts barking, say “quiet” and stick a treat in front of his nose. Praise him for being quiet and give him the treat.

When your dog starts barking, ask him to do something that’s incompatible with barking. Teach your dog to react to barking stimuli with something that inhibits him from barking, such as lying down in his bed.

Make sure your dog is getting sufficient physical and mental exercise every day. A tired dog is a good dog and one who is less likely to bark from boredom or frustration. Depending on his breed, age, and health, your dog may require several long walks as well as a good game of fetch and playing with interactive toys.

Q. Whenever I take my dog on walks he always barks at people and others dogs in my neighborhood. What should I do to resolve the problem
ANSWER : A. The very first thing to do is to make sure your dog is getting sufficient physical and mental exercise every day. A tired dog is a good, happy dog and one who is less likely to bark from boredom or frustration. Depending on his breed, age, and health, your dog may require several long walks as well as a good game of chasing the ball and playing with some interactive toys.

Figure out what he gets out of barking and remove it. Don’t give your dog the opportunity to continue the barking behavior.

Ignore your dog’s barking for as long as it takes him to stop. That means don’t give him attention at all while he’s barking. Your attention only rewards him for being noisy. Don’t talk to, don’t touch, or even look at him. When he finally quiets, even to take a breath, reward him with a treat. To be successful with this method, you must wait as long as it takes for him to stop barking. Yelling at him is the equivalent of barking with him.

Get your dog accustomed to whatever causes him to bark. Start with whatever makes him bark at a distance. It must be far enough away that he doesn’t bark when he sees it. Feed him lots of good treats. Move the stimulus a little closer (perhaps as little as a few inches or a few feet to start) and feed treats. If the stimulus moves out of sight, stop giving your dog treats. You want your dog to learn that the appearance of the stimulus leads to good things.

Teach your dog the ‘quiet’ command. Oddly, the first step is to teach your dog to bark on command. Give your dog the command to “speak,” wait for him to bark two or three times, and then stick a tasty treat in front of his nose. When he stops barking to sniff the treat, praise him and give him the treat. Repeat until he starts barking as soon as you say “speak.” Once your dog can reliably bark on command, teach him the “quiet” command. In a calm environment with no distractions, tell him to “speak.” When he starts barking, say “quiet” and stick a treat in front of his nose. Praise him for being quiet and give him the treat.

As in all training, always end training on a good note, even if it is just for obeying something very simple, like the ‘sit’ command. If you dog regresses in training, go back to the last thing he did successfully and reinforce that before moving on again. Keep sessions short, 15-20 minutes max, and do this several times a day.

Q. Infection in gums causing Brown drainage from eyes and stained fur where ever he bites. Antibiotics were used to clear it up a year ago.
ANSWER : A. It’s kind of unlikely that an infection in the gums is causing brown drainage in the eyes. There is a substance called porphyrin that’s in both tears and saliva. When white dogs like Bichons have excessive tearing, their fur is often stained under their eyes. You’ll see the same thing if they lick themselves excessively.

As far as the tear staining goes sometimes it’s effective to try to open up the tear ducts with a canula (a hollow needle) while under anesthesia. This prevents the tears from spilling onto the fur. There’s also a product called Angel Eyes that contains low doses of the antibiotic metronidazole, and for some reason that seems to decrease tear staining as well.

As for the chewing you need to talk to your vet about why he’s chewing – he may have fleas, mites/mange, or allergies.

Q. My puppy has a hard time staying by herself, she cries and chews her crate. How can I make her more comfortable being alone?
ANSWER : A. Crate training is an extremely slow process, so you should be taking baby steps:

First, lure her into the crate with high value treats and close the crate door, then toss several treats inside the crate. During this process do not make eye contact, speak to, or hand-feed her. Toss in more treats and stand up. Then, toss in some more treats and take one step away. Return to the crate, toss more and take a few steps away. Return, toss treats, take 5 steps away. Return, toss treats, take 3 steps away. The key is to randomly change up the length of time you are gone, slowly adding and subtracting seconds. Slowly work your way out of sight. Then, quickly return, and walk out of sight but stay out of sight a few seconds. Return, toss treats, walk out of sight a few more seconds, etc. Take it slowly.

Finally, when you let her out ignore her, don’t make a big deal of it.

Read Full Q/A … : If Your Dog Hates His Crate