trained.

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. If they are both intact, she may be in season or putting off pheromones that he thinks means she’s in season and he’s far too busy hoping she’s receptive to pay much attention to commands. If she is intact, confine her (or him) in a separate room until she is out of season. If you don’t plan on breeding her, I suggest getting her spayed and this will not only curtail this behavior, it will help protect her from getting serious uterine infections, getting pregnant accidentally and greatly decrease her chances of getting breast cancer. If she is spayed, she may have a remnant of reproductive tissue that is producing enough hormones to pique your male dog’s interest. In this case, get her in to see your vet and have her hormone levels tested.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Dogs most commonly whine when they`re seeking attention, when they`re excited, when they`re anxious or when they`re trying to appease you.
They love you! Dogs sometimes use eye contact to let you know how they feel, and a lot of the time it`s to say that they love you. A dog`s loving gaze has been found to release a `feel-good hormone` known as oxytocin in both you and your dog.
Most of the time, even the loudest of Shiba screams is just a Shiba Inu overreacting. It`s one of the endearing things that make Shibas – Shibas. However, excessive screaming or whining could be a sign of an overly anxious Shiba Inu that may need additional behavioral training / guidance.
Similar to humans, dogs can stare to interact with you, gather information, or communicate an idea. These types of staring can be interpreted by the context in which they happen. When your dog is staring at nothing, this might be a sign of anxiety or pain, or potentially be a signal of dementia.
Don`t give in to the whining. Don`t reward the behaviour, which includes not looking at your dog and not talking to your dog when he`s whining. Ignore your dog completely until he quiets. For example, your dog whines until you let her out of her crate.
They`re Reading Your Body Language. Dogs learn a lot from their owners, so a dog may stare at you, trying to understand what you`re going to do next or what you`re currently doing. If you catch your dog staring at you, they might be trying to figure out if you`re about to do something that will affect them.
Confusion. Another possible reason your dog is “ignoring” you is confusion, or more accurately doggie dementia or canine cognitive dysfunction (CCD). Dementia in dogs, as in humans, causes confusion and your dog may not understand what you`re asking of him.
Because of their high energy and intelligence, Shiba Inu dogs can have anxiety. This can appear as pacing, barking or whining, destructive behaviors, or even aggression when they are in situations that create anxiety.
Shiba Inus turn and stare at their owners for a number of reasons. Aggression, fear, trust, and affection are some of the most common but aren`t limited to those four. Shibas are an intelligent breed that has a wide vocabulary and means of communicating with you or others, staring is just one of their many tools.
The AKC says your dog staring is the “canine equivalent of a tap on the shoulder.” Your canine could be waiting to see if you`re going to do an action that impacts them, such as getting their leash for a walk, grabbing some dog food or commanding them to do a rewardable trick.
Your dog may stare at you for a number of reasons, including to seek attention or food, to express love, or in an attempt to interpret your body language and visual cues. A dog may also stare as a sign of aggression, particularly if they feel threatened or are guarding a valuable item, like a bone.
Then there`s the possibility that a dog is simply seeking attention in any form, or perhaps she`s merely waiting for praise or direction. Some dogs may just be trying to read an emotion in our human facial expressions. In any case, staring is typically considered to be a good thing.
Your Dog Needs or Wants Something

The most obvious reason your dog may be whining is that they need or want something from you, like food, water, or a walk. Maybe their favorite toy is stuck underneath the couch, or the cat is sleeping in their bed. The whining should stop once you identify the problem and fix it.

Ignore the whining behavior.

“Ignoring the whining is your best option,” says Dr. Coates. “Any type of attention will just reinforce the behavior.” Campbell says that pet parents should avoid giving attention or taking a puppy out of the crate until he is quiet.

Staring Can Make a Dog Feel Challenged

For a dog, a stranger staring at them might be seen as a challenge, threat, or something to make them uneasy. They may even fear you could be trying to take a resource, such as a toy or chew, away from them. That`s why it`s best to act calm around new dogs.

Loss of hearing, cognitive dysfunction, central nervous system disorders and medical conditions can all contribute to your dog`s excessive vocalization. He might whine or howl if he feels the urge to eliminate more, if he`s overeating and wants you to give him more food, or if he`s in pain.
When it comes to the symptoms of Canine Cognitive Dementia we look for similar ones to those that would make us question dementia as a diagnosis in humans: forgetfulness, changes in behaviour, and different sleep patterns. These symptoms are largely categorised into three stages; mild, moderate, and severe.
Why Do Older Dogs Follow You Everywhere? Older dogs may follow their owners purely out of familiarity and habit. However, if this is a new behavior, it may also indicate that things are changing for your dog, making them less confident. Perhaps your dog is starting to lose their hearing or vision.
Age is very important when it comes to social status within a family unit. In general, young-adult through middle-aged dogs tend to receive respect from other dogs. Older dogs age seven or older tend to be unable to command the respect they once did in their prime.
Your dog is disobedient

A dog`s senses of sight, hearing and smell lessen with age and they can appear less obedient. `Because dogs rely so heavily on these faculties, their loss may lead to anxiety and avoidance of once-straightforward situations,` says Claire.

There are some behaviors you don`t want to ignore, such as puppy nipping or pulling on leash. Any behavior that feels good to your dog, is naturally calming (such as licking or chewing), or is fun to do is not likely to go away when ignored.
Shibas are acutely aware of their environment, including everything and everyone in it, at all times. They are are highly sensitive to loud or strange noises and changes in their environment. They can be quite skittish around new people and environments.
It`s when the Shiba is happy, he pins his ears down to the side, making the ears look like little “wings.” The airplane ears are usually accompanied by a smile that`s formed with squinty eyes and lips pulled back to form a grimace.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. How do I desensitize my dog to squirrels and stray cats in the neighborhood?
ANSWER : A. It depends on the goal that you have in mind. I am going to assume that you would prefer that your dog not chase squirrels or stray cats in the yard/street. In this case, your options include: (1) training your dog on a “Leave it ” cue using positive reinforcement methods, (2) training your dog not to pull on its leash when it sees a squirrel/stray cat, and (3) training your dog to perform a more desirable behavior when it sees a squirrel/cat.
Training your dog on a cued “leave it” command is useful because it will give you the ability to tell your dog to stay away from any number of undesirable objects on your command. Training your dog to perform a more desireable behavior when it sees a squirrel or cat will substitute a behavior you find acceptable (sitting, laying down, coming to the door, etc.) with a behavior you dislike. Your dog can still react, just in a positive way. If your dog pulls on the leash every time you see a squirrel/cat, training not to pull will make your walk safer and more pleasant.
The ideal training method to use with dogs, or any animal for that matter, is positive reinforcement training, particularly a method called “clicker- training.” The basic concept of positive reinforcement training is to pair a reward (reinforcement) with a behavior you want to increase in frequency. In other words, when your dog performs the behavior you desire, it receives an award, which reinforces the desired behavior so you get more of that behavior. There are many excellent books in stores or on-line that describe positive reinforcement training in detail and many give step-by-step instructions for training common commands like “leave it”. Look for books that specifically mention positive reinforcement training or clicker-training. You can also take dog training classes to learn the techniques, find a mentor who already uses clicker-training, or request a consult from one of the pet experts on this site to guide you.

Q. My older rottweiler is continously whining and staring at my shiba inu female, and not listening to any commands even though he’s very well trained.
ANSWER : A. If they are both intact, she may be in season or putting off pheromones that he thinks means she’s in season and he’s far too busy hoping she’s receptive to pay much attention to commands. If she is intact, confine her (or him) in a separate room until she is out of season. If you don’t plan on breeding her, I suggest getting her spayed and this will not only curtail this behavior, it will help protect her from getting serious uterine infections, getting pregnant accidentally and greatly decrease her chances of getting breast cancer. If she is spayed, she may have a remnant of reproductive tissue that is producing enough hormones to pique your male dog’s interest. In this case, get her in to see your vet and have her hormone levels tested.

Q. Whenever I take my dog on walks he always barks at people and others dogs in my neighborhood. What should I do to resolve the problem
ANSWER : A. The very first thing to do is to make sure your dog is getting sufficient physical and mental exercise every day. A tired dog is a good, happy dog and one who is less likely to bark from boredom or frustration. Depending on his breed, age, and health, your dog may require several long walks as well as a good game of chasing the ball and playing with some interactive toys.

Figure out what he gets out of barking and remove it. Don’t give your dog the opportunity to continue the barking behavior.

Ignore your dog’s barking for as long as it takes him to stop. That means don’t give him attention at all while he’s barking. Your attention only rewards him for being noisy. Don’t talk to, don’t touch, or even look at him. When he finally quiets, even to take a breath, reward him with a treat. To be successful with this method, you must wait as long as it takes for him to stop barking. Yelling at him is the equivalent of barking with him.

Get your dog accustomed to whatever causes him to bark. Start with whatever makes him bark at a distance. It must be far enough away that he doesn’t bark when he sees it. Feed him lots of good treats. Move the stimulus a little closer (perhaps as little as a few inches or a few feet to start) and feed treats. If the stimulus moves out of sight, stop giving your dog treats. You want your dog to learn that the appearance of the stimulus leads to good things.

Teach your dog the ‘quiet’ command. Oddly, the first step is to teach your dog to bark on command. Give your dog the command to “speak,” wait for him to bark two or three times, and then stick a tasty treat in front of his nose. When he stops barking to sniff the treat, praise him and give him the treat. Repeat until he starts barking as soon as you say “speak.” Once your dog can reliably bark on command, teach him the “quiet” command. In a calm environment with no distractions, tell him to “speak.” When he starts barking, say “quiet” and stick a treat in front of his nose. Praise him for being quiet and give him the treat.

As in all training, always end training on a good note, even if it is just for obeying something very simple, like the ‘sit’ command. If you dog regresses in training, go back to the last thing he did successfully and reinforce that before moving on again. Keep sessions short, 15-20 minutes max, and do this several times a day.

Q. My puppy will be 8 weeks old tomorrow. I’ve had her for a week now, and she still isn’t responding to any training or her name. What can I do?
ANSWER : A. Try clicker training her to come when called. Clicker training is an effective way of training you dog to not only come when called, but can be used to teach a variety of tricks and tasks.

Have treats on hand that you know she loves, then simply click and treat. She will come to associate the sound with getting a treat. Start putting distance between you so she has to come to you. Call and click and when she comes to you for that treat, treat him and give her lots of praise. Move to hiding somewhere in the house, call and click. When she comes to you reliably inside when you call, click and treat. When this behavior is consistent, move outdoors with a very long leash. Call and click, if she doesn’t respond, give a light tug on the leash. If she takes even a single step toward you, click, treat and lots of praise. Keep doing this until she comes eagerly. Next, try her off-leash in a securely fenced area. Call and click. At this point she should be responding well and coming easily to the call and click. If she does not, go back to the last step she performed reliably and work on that again until she responds well. Eventually, you can start not treating her every time, but still praise her. Gradually lessen the frequency of the treats until she comes just to the click and praise.

Keep training sessions short, ten or fifteen minutes to start, no more than 30 minutes at a time and do it a few times a day. Try not to do it any time she is overly excited so that she can pay attention to you. Always end a training session on a good note, even if it is just getting him to do something she already does well on command. And never, NEVER punish a dog when they come to you, no matter how far they’ve made you chase them, no matter how frustrated and angry you might be. That teaches your dog that coming to you is a bad thing.

Q. My Beagle listens to me, but cries & whines when I’m gone & doesn’t listen to my parents. I adopted him just a couple days ago. Any tips for my folks?
ANSWER : A. I really highly doubt that your Beagle listens to you and has formed a connection with you in just a couple of days. It takes months to build up any kind of serious connection with your dog. You need to work on communication with your dog through training them to understand different cues. For instance the Leave-It cue: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R1TS5nA7z5Q

You have to work on bonding with your dog through mental stimulation. Training is very important. Luring each new behavior from scratch, and training using treats is how you form a strong bond with your new dog. No scolding is ever necessary… work on being calm, and positive, all the time.

If your dog is crying/whining when you leave, this may be separation anxiety. You’re going to have to separation train this dog from scratch. This dog needs to learn that separation can be a good thing! Tell your “folks” to NOT scold the dog when he is crying/whining after you leave, because that will make your dog MORE anxious when you leave next time. Your dog will be dwelling on the negative if your parents fuel your dogs negative feelings towards you leaving. FUN things should happen when you leave. Your parents should pull out the treats and start doing some basic obedience training with your dog. Your parents should stuff a Kong filled with awesome treats (peanut butter) and give it to him so he feels happy when you leave.

I have some excellent separation anxiety exercises you can work on. If you’d like, you can purchase a consultation with me, and I will go over how to separation train from scratch. It will make your dog comfortable being alone, guaranteed.

Read Full Q/A … : I Don't Like My Mother

Q. We have a 4 yr old lab-pit mix we raise from 6 weeks.If my husband tries to take hin by the collar and make him go out to pottie he growls.Problem?
ANSWER : A. This is not good behavior. Rather than take him by the collar, call him to come with you. If he’s not good about coming when called, you can work on that. Keeps treats on hand to to entice him out and reward him when he does go potty and he’ll come to look forward to it. Clicker training is another great way to teach a dog all kinds of things, from obedience to tricks.

Have treats on hand that you know he loves, then simply click and treat. He will come to associate the sound with getting a treat. Start putting distance between you so he has to come to you. Call and click and when he comes to you for that treat, treat him and give him lots of praise. Move to hiding somewhere in the house, call and click. When he comes to you reliably inside when you call, click and treat. When this behavior is consistent, move outdoors with a very long leash. Call and click, if he doesn’t respond, give a light tug on the leash. If he takes even a single step toward you, click, treat and lots of praise. Keep doing this until he comes eagerly. Next, try him off-leash in a securely fenced area. Call and click. At this point he should be responding well and coming easily to the call and click. If he does not, go back to the last step he performed reliably and work on that again until he responds well. Eventually, you can start not treating him every time, but still praise him. Gradually lessen the frequency of the treats until he comes just to the click and praise.

Keep training sessions short, ten or fifteen minutes to start, no more than 30 minutes at a time and do it a few times a day. Try not to do it any time he is overly excited so that he can pay attention to you. Always end a training session on a good note, even if it is just getting him to do something he already does well on command. And never, NEVER punish a dog when they come to you, no matter how far they’ve made you chase them, no matter how frustrated and angry you might be. That teaches your dog that coming to you is a bad thing.

Read Full Q/A … : Causes of Limping in Dogs

Q. We have a 7 week old Toy Poodle/Bichon. We are trying to house train her, any tips would be appreciated. Thanks.
ANSWER : A. It’s understandable that she isn’t able to hold her bladder all that well yet. The bladder doesn’t fully develop until around 6-7 months of age. For now, you should be bringing your pup outside every 30 minutes, immediately after she eats/drinks, immediately after she plays, immediately after a nap, immediately after training.

Is she crate trained? If she is not crate trained, I have some wonderful crate training exercises I could go over. Crate training and potty training go hand-in-hand. Any time you cannot keep your eyes on the puppy, she should be in the crate so accidents do not occur. The main idea when it comes to potty training is to keep your puppy successful.

After a while of bringing her outside every 30 minutes, you can try to increase that time. What you should do is wait until the 30 minute marker strikes, and then begin some basic obedience using treats, or some puppy-play! Then go out a few minutes later. Teach her it’s fun to hold her bladder!

Q. Is there a difference between puppy training and obedience training?
ANSWER : A. Puppy training is all about fun, as you accustom your puppy to following commands, teaching him the traits that will make it easier to adjust to obedience training. Obedience training, on the other hand, is a more formal and strict training method that teaches your puppy self discipline and how to obey the commands you give.

Read Full Q/A … : Leerburg Q&A