f. Help!

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. It’ s hard to tell from your description if these symptoms are indicating a neurological problem or perhaps they are anticipating something else, like vomiting or diarrhoea . If you are worried, I would suggest to have her checked over.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Anxiety/Fear: Panting, yawning, blinking, lip licking, and pacing are all signs of stress. Thunderstorms, car rides, or meeting new dogs can all cause anxiety, and your dog`s physical signs and body language are the only way he can tell you he`s uncomfortable.
Cognitive decline – As in humans, cognitive function tends to worsen as dogs age. Confusion, anxiety, and sleep disturbances increase as cognitive abilities decrease, which can lead to pacing, particularly at night. Pacing is one of the repetitive behaviors common in cognitive issues.
If pain or discomfort is not the cause of heavy panting, your dog is likely exhibiting panting and restless behavior is likely due to underlying stress, fear, or anxiety. Anxiety is the most common cause of panting and restlessness in dogs without other clinical signs.
Pacing and circling in dogs can be activities in which dogs engage in order to perform some normal activities like urinating, defecating, sniffing and investigating, or they can be compulsive behaviors which are not normal. They may also be indicative of underlying pain or a neurological disease or canine dementia.
There are many disorders of the respiratory system that can lead to breathing difficulties and panting in older dogs. Some of the most common include laryngeal paralysis, pyothorax, lung tumours, bronchitis and pneumonia.
Pet Your Dog Gently, Give Them Mental Stimulation, And Provide Positive Reinforcement. If your dog tends to pace excessively, there are some things you can try to do in an effort to calm them down. Try giving a lot of affection in the form of physical contact. This might help soothe any anxiety your pet is experiencing …
Dementia in dogs has three stages of symptoms—mild, moderate, and severe. There are typical patterns that appear within each stage. However, it`s important to note that not every dog follows these exact patterns or stages.
Below are the most common symptoms of dog dementia: Disorientation and confusion – Appearing lost or confused in familiar surroundings. Anxiety. Failing to remember routines and previously learned training or house rules.
Excessive panting is a common symptom of discomfort or pain. In fact, dogs who are uncomfortable often exhibit panting well before more obvious indicators of pain, such as whining or limping, arise. When the heart is doing an inadequate job of pumping blood around the body, the tissues become deprived of oxygen.
As a dog`s body begins to shut down, so do their mental faculties. Due to pain, medication, or simply as their body and brain stop functioning, they may become confused and disorientated. They may circle out of restlessness, anxiety, or distress.
Dogs can show a variety of behavioral changes when they are dying. The exact changes will vary from dog to dog, but the key is that they are changes. Some dogs will become restless, wandering the house and seeming unable to settle or get comfortable. Others will be abnormally still and may even be unresponsive.
Wincing, Whining or Crying

All three of these actions indicate an injury or some kind of pain your dog is experiencing. If you start to pet your dog and they shy away from your hand or whine, you know there is something wrong.

Many dogs with CHF will tire out more easily, have reduced stamina, and do not engage in playing or walking as they once did. Coughing when at rest or sleeping, excessive panting, persistent loss of appetite, a swollen belly, and pale or bluish gums are also signs associated with heart failure.
The last few days before your dog passes you may notice: extreme weight loss, a distant look in their eyes, a lack of interest in anything, restlessness or unusual stillness, a change in the way that your dog smells, and a changed temperament.
Dogs pant for many reasons, and often it`s normal. However, if they`re panting excessively, it could be due to anxiety, pain, heatstroke, or an underlying health condition. Therefore, it`s best to get them checked over by a veterinarian.
How long can a dog live with dementia? On average, a dog can live for around two years after an official diagnosis. That said, it depends on the dog`s overall physical and mental health, how fast the disease progresses, and how early the signs of dementia were picked up.
At what age does dog dementia start? Dog dementia begins to affect dogs around the age of 9. But, dogs as young as 8 years old may also develop the condition. And the chances of your dog developing CCD goes up as they get older.
He says while people are aware of dementia in humans, the problem with identifying it in animals is that it can happen quickly. “With dogs and cats, everything is in fast forward. You`ve got a puppy, then an adult dog … a senior, and finally the geriatric. And that happens in a short space of time.
The signs are insidious and progressive. Early in the disease signs are subtle and may come and go, but as the disease progresses the signs become more apparent. The pet has `good days` and `bad days` but gradually worsens.
While dogs don`t actually die from dementia, as health impairments caused by CCD compound, a dog`s life may reach a point where the quality of their life severely diminishes. As a result, some dog parents have to ask the incredibly difficult question whether to consider end-of-life care for their beloved furry friend.
Rapid breathing in dogs may simply be down to excitement or exercise. Dogs may also pant when they`re in fear, stressed or hot. Panting is one of the most important ways a dog thermoregulates. But beware, heavy or rapid breathing is an early sign of heat stroke and should be closely monitored.
Panting is a normal behavior for happy and active dogs. It helps dogs cool themselves down because they can`t sweat like humans do. Panting allows a dog to rapidly inhale, humidify, then exhale the air, which increases the evaporation of water from your dog`s nose and lungs.
Signs that a dog has liver disease can vary and include loss of appetite, vomiting, stomach ulceration, diarrhea, seizures or other neurologic problems, fever, blood clotting problems, jaundice (a yellow tinge noticeable in the skin, mucous membranes, and eyes), fluid collection in the abdomen, excessive urination and …

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My older springer Spaniel has been pacing steadily and is very restless. She has been panting constantly and doesn’t act like her normal self. Help!
ANSWER : A. It’ s hard to tell from your description if these symptoms are indicating a neurological problem or perhaps they are anticipating something else, like vomiting or diarrhoea . If you are worried, I would suggest to have her checked over.

Q. My dog has Addison’s Disease and is panting alot, is this normal?
ANSWER : A. I don’t typically associate panting with Addison’s disease. I do see panting (it’s a primary symptom) of the disease that’s the opposite of Addison’s disease, which is Cushing’s disease. Cushing’s disease involves having an overactive adrenal gland, as opposed to a non-active or under active adrenal gland. Panting can also happen with steroid administration. If you’ve upped the dose of prednisone that your dog normally takes to combat holiday stress that may be the cause of the panting.

Panting can be a sign of stress, so evaluate the environment and see if there’s something that could have your dog agitated – fireworks, small children visiting, etc. This is especially important with an addisonian dog, as I’m sure you know.

Other causes of panting could include primary respiratory problems or heart disease, since low oxygen states can trigger panting. Definitely mention this to your vet (a phone call isn’t a bad idea) for this reason, just to see if he’ like to examine your dog to make sure everything’s OK>

Q. My cat is excessively scrstching herself., to the point she has sores. She is strictly an indoor cat. Did have flees been treated for 2 months
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. How do I know if I am losing my cat. She is 8 and weighs about 20lbs. She is having issues breathing and I don’t have any money to take her to the vet
ANSWER : A. Your cat really should be seen by a vet. Her weight may be the only thing causing her breathing problems, but without an exam, there’s no way to know for sure.

If you are in financial difficulty, there are ways of still getting your pet treated by a veterinarian. Ask if they take Care Credit and apply online. This is a credit card specifically for medical, dental, and veterinary expenses.

Call a local animal shelter or college of veterinary medicine in your area and ask if they have a low- or no-cost veterinary care program.

GiveForward and Youcaring.com are crowd funding websites that help you raise money to help take care of your pets

Harley’s Hope Foundation is an organization that ensures low income pet parents and their companion or service animals remain together when issues arise.

Many breed rescues and groups have specials funds available for owners who need financial assistance, such as the Special Needs Dobermans, Labrador Lifeline, and Pitbull Rescue Central.

Banfield Pet Hospital has its own programs for owners that can’t afford their pet’s care.

Feline Veterinary Emergency Assistance (FVEAP) works with seniors, people with disabilities, people who

have lost their job, good Samaritans who rescue a cat or kitten who may need financial assistance to save a beloved companion.

The Feline Veterinary Emergency Assistance Program is a nonprofit 501 (c)(3) organization that provides financial assistance to cat and kitten guardians who are unable to afford veterinary services to save their companions when life-threatening illness or injury strikes.

God’s Creatures Ministry helps pay for veterinarian bills for those who need help.

IMOM is dedicated to insure that no companion animal has to be euthanized simply because their caretaker

is financially challenged.

The Onyx & Breezy Foundation has many programs including helping people with medical bills. They are a good resource for information.

Brown Dog Foundation provides funding to families with a sick pet that would likely respond to treatment, but due to circumstances, there is not enough money immediately available to pay.

Some groups help with specific disease, such as Canine Cancer Awareness, The Magic Bullet Fund, Helping Harley Fund, and Muffin Diabetes Fund.

The Pet Fund and Redrover.org are great sources for help to care for your pet.

The Humane Society website has many links to other organizations that help with veterinary expenses.

Read Full Q/A … : Vetinfo

Q. Can you put your sick 16yr cat down with pills, cannot afford a veterinarian.
ANSWER : A. If you are in financial difficulty, there are ways of still getting your pet treated by a veterinarian. Ask if they take Care Credit and apply online. This is a credit card specifically for medical, dental, and veterinary expenses.

Call a local animal shelter or college of veterinary medicine in your area and ask if they have a low- or no-cost veterinary care program.

GiveForward and Youcaring.com are crowd funding websites that help you raise money to help take care of your pets

Harley’s Hope Foundation is an organization that ensures low income pet parents and their companion or service animals remain together when issues arise.

Many breed rescues and groups have specials funds available for owners who need financial assistance, such as the Special Needs Dobermans, Labrador Lifeline, and Pitbull Rescue Central.

Banfield Pet Hospital has its own programs for owners that can’t afford their pet’s care.

Feline Veterinary Emergency Assistance (FVEAP) works with seniors, people with disabilities, people who

have lost their job, good Samaritans who rescue a cat or kitten who may need financial assistance to save a beloved companion.

The Feline Veterinary Emergency Assistance Program is a nonprofit 501 (c)(3) organization that provides financial assistance to cat and kitten guardians who are unable to afford veterinary services to save their companions when life-threatening illness or injury strikes.

God’s Creatures Ministry helps pay for veterinarian bills for those who need help.

IMOM is dedicated to insure that no companion animal has to be euthanized simply because their caretaker

is financially challenged.

The Onyx & Breezy Foundation has many programs including helping people with medical bills. They are a good resource for information.

Brown Dog Foundation provides funding to families with a sick pet that would likely respond to treatment, but due to circumstances, there is not enough money immediately available to pay.

Some groups help with specific disease, such as Canine Cancer Awareness, The Magic Bullet Fund, Helping Harley Fund, and Muffin Diabetes Fund.

The Pet Fund and Redrover.org are great sources for help to care for your pet.

The Humane Society website has many links to other organizations that help with veterinary expenses.

Q. My cats nose is stopped up on antibiotics. She has a loss of appetite, acting normal though. Is 3 ounces of can food enough in 24h? 9 pound cat
ANSWER : A. Cats with stopped up noses tend to eat much less, as you’ve noted, because they can’t smell their food as well. And the smell of food is pretty important to a cat’s appetite. You can start by warming up the food in a microwave – not too hot, test it yourself by putting your finger right in the center, as the temperature of microwave food can vary – as this will intensify the smell and hopefully make your cat more interested.

Saline nose drops, like those that are used on little kids, are safe to use on a cat to clean the discharge that is dried around and in the nose. There’s a brand called Little Noses that’s available in the U.S. That I like. You can put it on a q-tip and try to remove the debris. Humidifying the air with a humidifier can help as well, or you can put the cat in the bathroom and run the shower enough to generate steam. Don’t use “real” nose drops like Neo-synephrine or anything else like that – cats quickly build up resistance to them.

A 3 oz can of food is an OK amount in 24 hours, but do try the techniques above to help your cat get more interested in food. You might also try some baby food – no garlic or onions in the ingredients – as cats usually really like the taste of it.

Q. 2 month old Bulldog. While playing gets TOO rough:gripping hand REALLY tight/growling/shaking to the point of drawing blood. Aggresive?Normal?HELP!!
ANSWER : A. For the most part, this sounds pretty normal to me. English Bulldogs can be like this. What you can do is teach him bite inhibition. He needs to know that biting gets him nothing. Each and every time he nips, even gently, you immediately yelp like a puppy would, stand up, cross your arms, and ignore your puppy. Once he is ignoring you, go back to calmly playing with him WITH A TOY. Remember to always use a toy when playing with/petting/interacting with puppies. They will be teething very soon, and they don’t understand that biting you is inappropriate, so using a toy to redirect their attention is important. He needs SOMETHING to bite, or else he will choose your hand. Give him more options.

Another thing you can do is have a toy that YOU OWN. This can be a soft braided rope toy or something of the like. Dot not allow your dog to have this toy whenever he wants. This toy disappears when you are done playing with him with it, and reappears when you want to play. Never allow him to “win” games with this toy. Eventually, the toy will hold so much meaning, when he sees it, he will be instantly interested in the toy instead of your hands.

It also helps to have two bags of toys. Bag#1 is full of chew toys/rope toys/soft toys/etc. It comes out for one week, and then disappears and out comes Bag#2. Bag#2 has the same types of toys in it. This will keep the toys feeling like “new” to your pup and make him less likely to chew on you during play!

Q. 16 y/o dog started to pee randomly on floor. Her renal, liver, pancreas tests are fine. Will proin help? She takes Stilbesterol 1/week
ANSWER : A. Proin is commonly used in older female dogs that are having urinary incontinence. This medication helps to strengthen the muscles surrounding the bladder and can decrease urine leakage. Usually this medication is used when there is an obvious sign of urinary incontinence such as dribbling when not attempting to urinate, or leakage left behind on bedding.

If your dog is having actual episodes of urinating in the house, it may indicate something else such as a bladder infection or bladder stones, or even cognitive issues in older dogs. Urine samples can be brought to you vet to check for an infection, and an X-ray can be taken to rule out bladder stones if this has not already been done. Some older dogs may begin to “forget” their bathroom habits and may need additional trips outside to go, or a refresher in potty training. Supplements to help with brain health can also help if a dog is experiencing cognitive issues such as forgetfulness, disorientation or confusion. Doggy diapers are also more common in older dogs, and can help prevent accidents in the house while working on solving the underlying issue.

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