Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. It is impossible to say what it is or if it needs treatment without examination. If it doesn’t seem to be causing a problem then you coukd monitor it and if it gets worse or changes then you need to take him to your vet for investigation.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

A cat`s paws are particularly susceptible to pododermatitis – a condition that affects the foot pads of cats and causes the skin to appear red and swollen. Dermatitis is one of the main reasons owners take their cat to see a vet, with 20% of all medical veterinary appointments being linked to the condition.
Cysts: A cyst is a raised bump caused by a blocked hair follicle, skin pore or a bacterial skin infection. Anal gland abscesses: If your cat`s anal glands get blocked, they can become infected and abscessed. Eosinophilic granulomas: These bright red or pink, bumpy areas of inflammation are common in cats.
Cutaneous horns are a relatively common feline skin condition. Typically, they appear on a cat`s paw pads, although horns can occur on the face or other body parts as well. The growths may appear solo, or they can crop up in groups on multiple paw pads.
Signs and symptoms of a bacterial infection in the paws include redness, swelling, pain, itching, and drainage. Your veterinarian can prescribe oral or topical antibiotics to treat an infected paw.
Most paw scrapes heal on their own, but if your cat`s wound still hasn`t closed after a week or appears swollen and oozy, make an appointment with your veterinarian.
It may appear as a small nodule, a reddish colored skin plaque, or as a papule – small and blister like in appearance, but differentiated by its lack of fluid. The SCC does not retain its appearance as a solid mass. Over time it will grow, the tissue within the mass will die (necrotize), and the tumor will ulcerate.
If your cat has soft, round lumps under their skin, they might have lipomas (noncancerous fatty tumors). Although lipomas in cats are usually benign, they require proper diagnosis by a veterinarian. Today, our Gaithersburg team shares the signs of this condition and when to take your feline friend to the vet clinic.
Horned Paw: These benign growths, also called cutaneous horns, are often thin and horn-like and show up in a cat`s paw pads. They are caused by keratin overgrowth within the skin, similar to callus formation in humans.
All dogs and cats can get sebaceous cysts, whether purebred or not. The cysts look like enclosed small bumps that stay whitish in color and are raised from the skin. When touched, they feel like small circular or oval lumps under the skin. If your pet has a sebaceous cyst, you will notice a raised bump.
The claws become rough and pitted, develop a scaly base, and they may eventually become deformed. Ringworm may sometimes cause a more generalized disease where a much larger area of the body is affected, often seen as patches of hair loss.
Mix together 1 pint water, 1/2-teaspoon salt, and 1/2 teaspoon calendula tincture. Soak an injured paw in the solution. If the wound is on the body, put the solution in a squirt bottle or large syringe and gently apply it to the injured area. Repeat the soaking or application every 4 to 6 hours for the first 24 hours.
Depending on the nature of the injury it can take between 10 days to three or four weeks for the pet to recover, during which time it may have mobility issues. Another factor to consider is litter tray use, since it is undesirable for cat litter to contaminate an open wound or burn.
Good items to have at home in case of wounds include: Sterile, non-stick gauze. Antiseptic solution (povidone-iodine or chlorhexidine diacetate)
It`s always best to take your cat to the vet if they have a limp in order to avoid the possibility of infection and to help keep their condition from worsening. The cause of your cat`s limp might not be easy to spot but the treatment could be as simple as trimming their claws or removing a tiny splinter from their paw.
Lipomas are non-cancerous lumps. They are fatty tumours that can show up anywhere on your cat`s body. They are more common in older cats or cats who are overweight. These lumps are usually harmless unless they are in a place that is getting in your cat`s way.
A skin tumor can appear as a red, irregular shaped lump on the skin that may bleed, or expel thick fluids. The feline may lick or rub the affected area, as these skin tumors are often painful to the touch.
POV: you find a lump on your cat

While some lumps may be completely harmless, all lumps need to be seen by a vet to make sure. It could be a small infection, a parasite, or something more serious. But there`s no way to know for sure without consulting a vet. Some skin lumps on cats can pop up overnight.

A lump or bump may appear due to mild trauma, which should heal on its own, but it could get infected, so keep an eye on it. If an infection causes an abscess, a pus-filled swollen spot on the skin, we may need to drain and treat the abscess, and may need to prescribe antibiotics to help your kitty heal.
Angiosarcomas (also called hemangiosarcoma, lymphangiosarcoma, and angioendothelioma) are the most likely of all soft-tissue tumors to grow quickly and spread to other locations. These tumors can arise at any time, but seem to occur most often in older, neutered male cats.
Abscesses are usually treated with surgery to flush out the pus and cut away any dead skin. In some cases, small latex drains are inserted to continue to drain the pus and allow the wound to heal.
In cats, diseases of the paw pads are uncommon, but when they do occur, scaling and crusting, swelling, digital calluses and horns, and ulceration are the most common problems. The underlying causes are variable and include trauma, allergic diseases, infections, immune-mediated diseases, tumors, and viral diseases.
An abscess will look like an open sore or a painful swelling on your cat`s skin. Often, the fur at the site is missing or matted. The wound itself may or may not be oozing foul-smelling pus, which in some cases may include blood.
These papillomas are usually solitary, and often cauliflower like. Multiple viral papillomas have been reported in middle-aged to old cats. These lesions can occur anywhere on the body, but mostly involve the head, neck, along the topline of the back, the abdomen and lower legs.
There are many causes of ringworm and cats are only one of them. Cats are often blamed for it in people, horses, and other pets. Ringworm sounds super scary, but it really isn`t. It is a common issue in outdoor cats, shelters, and especially kittens.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

Read Full Q/A … : I found Pickle on

Q. How should I interpret my cat’s tail movements?
ANSWER : A. Our feline friends express themselves in many different ways, including through the use of their tails. Most pet owners pay close attention to a happy or excited dog, but they are sometimes less attentive to the posture and movement of their cat. Here are some of the most common cat tail behaviors, and the underlying emotion behind each action:

A flicking tail: Many anxious, nervous or stressed cats will hold their tail in a low position and flick it quickly back and forth. This is often referred to as angry tail, and a pet owner or veterinarian should be on guard for any possible aggressive or defensive activity. If a cat is moving their tail slowly, and not exhibiting the flicking motion, then this cat is at a much calmer state.

Vertical position: Most of the time when a cat is holding their tail in a straight, vertical position this is indicating curiosity and a playful mood. A cat chasing after a laser pointer or playing toys will often have their tails in a vertical position showing their enjoyment. This position also helps with balanced movements. In contrast, if the tail is in the vertical position and the cat’s back is arched with pinned back ears then this could demonstrate a feeling of being threatened and thus result in defensive or aggressive behaviors.

The Tucked Tail: Similar to a dog, a tucked tail often indicates submission or fear. Your cat is conveying upset feelings and should most likely be left alone. This tucked tail appearance can also make a cat look smaller and less threatening to an aggressive cat.

The Tail Twine: Cats will often hook their tail around another cat’s tail, owner’s legs or other objects to show a friendly and affectionate nature. They are also trying to indicate whether they want to receive affection from their owners, be fed or have playtime.

The next time you are home with your feline companion take note on how they express themselves through their tail movements, their ears, body posture and vocalization. You can start to better understand their needs and wants, in addition to what makes them uncomfortable or happy. Cats will surprise you with their array of emotions and varied expressions they can express.

Q. I have a cat with that virur (aids) could u tell me about her disposition and care
ANSWER : A. Thanks for your question.

Unfortunately the discussion about what you asked has no straightforward answers and can be quite complex.

First thing that I would double check, considering that your cat is very young, is whether she is really infected. It is important to remember that kittens born to FIV-infected queens will receive antibodies from the queen via the milk, and so will test positive early in life though they may not be infected. Kittens with a positive test result should always be retested when they are 5-6 months of age.

Many FIV infected cats are able to live happily with the virus for a long period of time, and indeed the virus will not necessarily ever cause clinical disease.

Different factors will influence the onset of disease in your cat including:

– The ”subtype” of FIV your cat is infected with,

– Her immune response

– The presence or absence of other infectious agents.

To maintain a good quality of life for your cat, I will give you these general guidelines, but you will then find certainly helpful to speak with your veterinarian for specific cases.

– Some antiviral medications used in human patients with HIV infection have also been shown to help some cats with FIV infection. Interferons may have anti-viral effects and modify immune responses. A recombinant feline interferon (feline interferon omega) is available in some countries. Down side is the cost usually.

– Keep your cat away from other cats and possible source of infections;

– Maintain good quality nutrition;

– Keep your cat indoor if possible regularly checked by your veterinarian;

– Keep your cat away from non-infected cats.

Q. Small lump on my dog’s throat, what should I do?
ANSWER : A. Lumps and bumps on the throat or neck can be caused by a wide range of things. Depending on the lumps size, if it is under the skin or appears on the skin itself, and its location on the throat can all indicate different things.

There are a large number of structures in the neck there ranging from thyroid glands, nerves, salivary glands and even lymph nodes. Illness, disease or irritation can all cause swelling or issues there. You may also see additional symptoms such as trouble swallowing, drooling, lethargy or changes in weight and appetite to help narrow down the cause of the lump. Testing via blood work or an X-ray may help to determine the cause and proper treatment.

Lumps and bumps on the skin can also be caused by allergies such as an allergic reaction or sting, or even an abscess under the skin. Allergies are usually treated with an allergy medication to help stop the response and any itching or redness. Abscesses (cuts or scrapes that get infected and swell with fluid) are usually hot or painful to the touch and may ooze debris. These are usually drained at a vet, and then treated with antibiotics.

If the cause of the lump is not known, your vet may also recommend taking a sample of the lump to send to a Lab. This can help to determine what exactly is causing the lump and how to treat it.

Q. our indoor female cat got a whiff of an outdoor male cat and is now lashing out at everyone, including us and our other indoor cat. Help!
ANSWER : A. This behavior is called displaced aggression. Your indoor cat is very upset about the outdoor male cat but is unable to do anything directly about him, so she instinctively lashes out at anyone or thing that comes near her. She is defending herself and her territory from the outdoor male cat – just defending it from the wrong people/cat. Don’t worry she should calm down as long as the outdoor male isn’t hanging around and continuing to annoy her. If it is, try temporarily block her view out the window/door and purchase Feliway pheremone spray or diffuser. Feliway imitates the facial pheremones of cats, helping to calm them and make them feel more secure. Feliway can be purchased in most petstores, online, or at your veterinarians. If you continue to have problems, I would be happy to consult with you individually to help resolve the situation.

Q. Should cats be declawed, or should they have their claws capped?
ANSWER : A. Declawing is the removal of the claw and last bone of that digit, and I would definitely advise against it. Many people assume that declawing is more or less like trimming your nails or getting a manicure, but the truth is that it is a painful and permanently crippling procedure. In fact, some countries have outlawed this procedure.

Not only is it painful, but declawed cats often find it hard to function normally without the last bone and claw. As a result, many cats experience behavioral changes, such as becoming more aggressive.

Besides, if you’re planning to have your cat go outside anytime in its life, I would highly recommend never to declaw your cat, since declawing leaves your cat defenseless, especially while interacting with other animals.

If your cat is clawing up furniture or other objects, I would recommend giving your cat more toys to claw at. In this sense, buying multiple scratching posts would be a very good option.

You might also want to consider discouraging your cat from scratching furniture by using a loud, firm voice whenever the scratching begins.

So, to sum up, having your cat’s nails capped is definitely a better, more humane solution. However, this may not be necessary either if you provide enough toys to claw at, try to correct unwanted scratching behavior, and trim your cat’s claws regularly.

Q. My cat is pooping outside of the litter bix. He is 2 1/2. He did this as a kitten. It stopped then started about 3 months ago. Litterbox is clean.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination or house soiling can be a frustrating problem but with a bit of detective work on your part, there is hope. First, before deciding that this is a behavioral issue, any medical problems (diarrhea, constipation, fecal incontinence, pain on defecation, etc.) need to be ruled out and/or treated. If your cat receives a clean bill of health from your vet but is still eliminating outside the litterbox, then we need to consider that something about the box itself might be aversive to your cat. Cats can be quite finicky about their litterbox and toileting habits. Below I have listed common recommendations and cat preferences for litterbox use. Review the list and make any changes that could account for your cat’s aversion to defecating in the litterbox:
* Soft, fine-grained clumping litter (vs, coarse-grained, non-clumping litter)
* Unscented
* 1 – 1 1/2 inch depth (especially older cats or cats with hip problems)
* Larger pans (especially for large cats) – want to get whole body inside – poop just outside the box might mean the box is too small
* Open, non-hooded
* At least one shallow side to get in and out easily
* Easy to get to – not hidden away, preferably in areas they spend time in or near – and not near appliances that make scary, unpredictable noises (washers, dryers, refrigerators)
* Scoop minimum 1X/day – preferably 2
* Clean the litterbox with soap and water and put in fresh scoopable litter at least once/month (instead of just continuously adding)
* Some cats prefer to urinate in one box and defecate in a separate box, so you may need 2 boxes even if you just have 1 cat. Multi-cat households should have 1 box/cat plus 1 extra.