do today

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. If she/he has fully recovered from the mini stroke then you should keep him/her quiet and monitor closely. There is not much more that you can do until you see your vet.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

If you suspect your pet is having a stroke, get them to the vet immediately.
Although there is no specific treatment for strokes in dogs and cats, most pets tend to recover within a few weeks. However, recovery may not be possible if the stroke has affected a vital part of the brain.
Like their owners, dogs can be affected by a number of emergency health conditions, including strokes. While strokes are less common in dogs than they are in humans, they are equally as serious.
Symptoms of strokes in dogs can include: Inability to walk or walking with an uncoordinated gait. Head tilt. Abnormal eye movements, side to side or rotary (nystagmus)
Therapy dogs can assist a stroke survivor with their stroke recovery exercises. A simple activity like brushing the dog`s fur can act as a hand exercise and help decrease spasticity and increase motor recovery.
Dog Stroke Symptoms

The onset of a spinal stroke in dogs is sudden and scary. Most of the time when a dog has an FCE they cry out and then are suddenly unable to walk on their own. Sometimes the spinal stroke symptoms don`t appear until a few moments later when the initial shock has worn off.

The prognosis for most dogs after a stroke is generally good and most recover within a few weeks. However, this does depend on the severity of the stroke as indicated by the clinical signs. It also depends on the dog`s overall health prior to the stroke.
“Symptoms of a TIA usually go away within an hour,” says Dr. Cucchiara. “Because the symptoms go away, many people ignore them – which is a big mistake because they may be a red flag warning you that a major stroke could happen, and often within the next 48 hours.”
If you ever encounter anyone experiencing mini stroke symptoms, dial 9-1-1 immediately. It is important to be evaluated as soon as possible following a mini stroke, because you may require emergency treatment in order to prevent or minimize irreversible damage.
“Dogs can recover from strokes. Some dogs worsen over the initial 24-72 hours and then we begin to see signs of recovery. In general we expect dogs that are improving in the first three to five days to have a good recovery within four to six weeks` time, some with residual deficits but still a good quality of life.”
The good news is that if your cat receives speedy treatment (within the first 24 hours), they`ll often make a full recovery within a few weeks. However, depending on the cause, they may be at risk of another stroke in future.
Limb shaking TIAs are a rare form of TIAs that present as involuntary movements and often confused with focal motor seizures. [1–6] This distinction, however, is crucial as this form of TIA is often an indicator of severe carotid occlusive disease and patients are at high risk of future stroke.
Even if your dog has suffered from a stroke they will still want to go for walk. Once your veterinarian gives the okay, it is time to grab the leash and enjoy the great outdoors. If your dog cannot readily walk without a wheelchair then take the wheelchair. Some dogs must also be pushed in strollers after a stroke.
Some family members notice strange behavior in their loved ones after a stroke, such as disorganized thoughts and actions that don`t seem to make sense. Always talk to a doctor if you are worried by unusual changes in behavior because it could be a sign of post-stroke dementia.
Remain as calm as possible. Let your dog move around if they want to without stopping them, but if they come to you crying or seeking attention, take time to speak to them softly and pet them. Offer the dog water periodically. Some dogs develop an unquenchable thirst following an acute stroke.
Dogs are pack animals, and touch is one way that they are able to keep tabs of their pack. When we stroke our dog he knows that we are touching base and are with him. Research has shown that dogs spend more time around their owners who pet them than those that praise them.
A stroke can also cause your pet to lose control of its body systems, causing vomiting, gasping, diarrhea, or loss of bladder control. As the stroke intensifies, your pet may have heart arrhythmia or an inability to breathe.
It is very common for dogs to close their eyes when you scratch them, and usually, it indicates a level of satisfaction, pleasure, or enjoyment. Similarly to humans, dogs have a limited amount of attention that they can divide between various sensory experiences.
There are many disorders of the respiratory system that can lead to breathing difficulties and panting in older dogs. Some of the most common include laryngeal paralysis, pyothorax, lung tumours, bronchitis and pneumonia.
Can dogs recover from strokes? Depending on the cause and the speed of treatment, some dogs can recover from strokes. However, recovery can take weeks or months, and some dogs never fully recover. Dogs with long-lasting symptoms may have life-long incoordination, head tilt, or blindness.
The two most common forms of canine strokes occur when an artery in the brain becomes blocked and cuts off oxygen to the area or when blood vessels in the brain rupture and hemorrhage. These types of strokes are referred to as cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) or transient ischemic attacks (TIA), and can be very serious.
The short answer is yes; the brain can heal after acute trauma from a stroke or brain injury, although the degree of recovery will vary. The reason the brain can recover at all is through neuroplasticity, sometimes referred to as brain plasticity.
Do not eat too much of any single food, particularly processed foods and foods high in salt. You should limit the amount of salt you eat to no more than 6g a day because too much salt will increase your blood pressure. 6g of salt is about 1 teaspoon. Find out more about healthy eating and losing weight.
What Is a Silent Stroke? When the brain is suddenly cut off from blood supply, a silent stroke can occur, damaging brain cells in the process. There may be no warning signs leading up to this and many people do not realize they experienced a silent stroke until they undergo a brain scan.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My cat is excessively scrstching herself., to the point she has sores. She is strictly an indoor cat. Did have flees been treated for 2 months
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. Need help, we have done flea bath ,sprayed the house and used charts ultra guard pro and still have fleas .how can we get rid of them
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Q. My pet has had a mini stroke possibly. I can’t get in to see vet until tomorrow but have talked to him on phone. Can you tell me anything to do today
ANSWER : A. If she/he has fully recovered from the mini stroke then you should keep him/her quiet and monitor closely. There is not much more that you can do until you see your vet.

Q. How do I FINALLY rid all 4 of my cats of tapeworms after 2 years of dealing with it? Fleas seem to be controlled. I know they are the vector.
ANSWER : A. If your cats keep getting tapeworms, then they are picking up fleas from somewhere. Fleas will hitch a ride on your pant leg from outside.

Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

You can also use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the life cycle.

Q. My 13 year old male cat is acting lethargic & doesn’t seem to be feeling well. I don’t know what’s wrong except that he has fleas. Can too many fleas
ANSWER : A. Excessive fleas can cause anemia in cats, left untreated, this can be life-threatening. I recommend getting your cat seen by your vet right away for his illness. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard, since fleas will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Q. Dog licked some hair bleach on my head (frosting my hair) and swallowed it, I immediately cleaned out his mouth and gave him water. Anything else????!
ANSWER : A. Keep an eye on him for signs of stomach upset, vomiting diarrhea and his tongue for signs of blistering and feed him an extra meal to help absorb and move anything through. With what small amount he got and your quick action (good job!) I suspect he’ll be okay. If he does start getting sick, get him in to your vet or emergency clinic right away.

The Kansas State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital offers a FREE 24-hour poison control hotline for pet and animal guardians as well as veterinarians. The vet teaching hospital asks for your patience when you call, as the person answering the phone may need to take a few minutes to consult with the vet on duty.

Pets they can help with: All pets

Phone: 1-785-532-5679

Hotline hours: 24-hours a day, FREE to call

ASPCA PET POISONING FREE APP available for Android and iPhone.

Q. My dogs were given Hartz ultrguard seven days ago. Can they be given frontline now because they still have fleas
ANSWER : A. In flea control, you get what you pay for. I would wait one more week before applying another product.

For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

Q. How do I determine how much my overweight pet should weigh?
ANSWER : A. There are many tools to determine overweight and obesity levels in pets. A new tool, morphometric measurements and body fat index, are available to accurately determine a pet’s ideal weight; this will allow an accurate determination of the amount of food a pet should receive to achieve weight loss. Feeding the correct amount will lead to greater weight loss success.

There are many weight loss food options to help pets reach their ideal weight. Your veterinarian can help make a ideal weight recommendation. Here are some tips to help your dog lose weight in a healthy and safe way:

1. Diet: Providing a healthy and well balanced diet is essential to your pet’s overall health. Finding the right food for your dog can be a challenging process. For those overweight animals many commercial dog companies offer weight loss diets, but it is important to evaluate food labels for adequate nutritional content.

You want to ensure you are not missing other essential vitamin or mineral content. Volume of food is also important and the amount of food that works for one breed of dog may not be the same for another breed of dog. Portion control as opposed to free-choice feeding can help your dog to drop a few unnecessary pounds.

There are also prescription weight loss foods designed by veterinary nutritionists, such as Hill’s r/d (http://bit.ly/1AoENSd). Some pet owners find that home cooking is the best option for helping to provide a well-balanced and realistic diet plan. There are websites such as balanceit.com that offers recipes to fit your dog’s specific needs. Consulting with your veterinarian or a veterinary nutritionist to find the appropriate diet is a great way to help your dog be as healthy as possible.

2. Exercise: Another great tactic for weight loss for your dog is exercise. Whether this is through running, walking or playing with a favorite toy all of these are wonderful types of exercise to help keep your dog at a lean and healthy weight.

For those pet owners with busy schedules utilizing professional dog walking services or playtime through dog daycare services is another option. It has been shown that those pet owners that exercise regularly with their pets generally live a healthier lifestyle.

3. Physical therapy: As animals age pet owners offer encounter their favorite canine having more difficulty walking and have a dwindling desire to play with toys. Physical therapy, specifically hydrotherapy is a wonderful way to help older and arthritic animals gain more mobility and lose weight. Hydrotherapy has been proven to have several therapeutic effects on the body including, muscle strengthening, relief of swelling, decreased joint pain, less stiffness in limbs, improved circulation, weight loss, and increased tissue healing to name a few. For more information on the benefits of hydrotherapy:
http://bit.ly/1w1qqoy

4. Veterinary visit and blood work: Weight gain can also be related to underlying health concerns such as hypothyroidism or other endocrine disorders. Scheduling a veterinary evaluation and routine blood work can be another important component in increasing the longevity of your dog’s life. Conditions such as hypothyroidism that predispose dogs to gain weight can be treated with a daily medication to improve hormonal balance. If feel that your dog is unnecessarily overweight there can be an underlying health condition that needs to be addressed.

5. Healthy treats: Pet owners love the chance to reward their favorite canine companion with treats and most dogs jump at the chance to consume these delicious products. The problem is many treats, which can include commercial dog treats or table scrapes can add many unnecessary calories to your dog’s daily intake. Reading labels and making note of the calories in these treats is an important component of understanding your dog’s overall health. Treats should not exceed more than 10 percent of your pet’s daily calories. There are healthier treats that can be offered to your pet to keep calories lower yet provide a fuller sensation. A pet owner can add steamed or pureed vegetables, such as carrots, green beans or sweet potato to add more fiber and thus a fuller feeling for your dog.