Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Restrict his activity as much as you can. No excessive running, jumping or playing. If he doesn’t improve in a day or so, see your veterinarian. Do not give any medications to your pet without the advice of your veterinarian.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

In general, gradual onset limps in dogs are caused by an underlying, chronic or degenerative condition, such as osteoarthritis or dysplasia. Sudden onset limps, on the other hand, are usually caused by an injury or trauma. Just because your dog has a gradual limp does not mean you should put off making an appointment.
If the limp doesn`t resolve itself within 48 hours, becomes worse, or if your pup is whining or yelping, it`s time to call your vet to book an examination for your pet. Your veterinarian is best equipped to determine the cause and severity of your dog`s pain.
Nail Injury or Muscle or Tendon Damage

If it is a pulled nail/injured nail bed, dogs usually take a week or two to stop hurting. If he pulled a muscle or damaged a tendon jerking his leg or falling off the table, however, it is going to take longer, up to about 6 weeks.

The pain of a broken nail can be so intense that it can bring the biggest, bravest dog to its knees. Any breed, tough or fragile, will hold up a foot, limp around, and whine in discomfort. Plus, the bleeding that accompanies a torn nail further complicates the matter.
Sometimes limping will go away on its own, especially if you provide some at-home support like a brace. Other times limping may be a sign of a more serious injury or condition that will require veterinary intervention.
If your dog has swelling associated with a sprain, bruise, or tendonitis, apply ice packs to the area for 15 minutes twice daily. Flowing water improves circulation, reduces swelling, and promotes healing. Place your dog in a tub and swirl water around the leg or spray the leg with a hose for 15 minutes twice daily.
Over the next few weeks, the limping should gradually improve, but if your dog is too active, the limp may temporarily worsen. Call your veterinarian if a postoperative limp is severe or doesn`t start improving with a day or two of rest.
If the limp doesn`t begin to resolve itself, is becoming worse, or is accompanied with whining or yelping, it`s time to call your vet or visit your nearest emergency vet. Your veterinarian has the training and knowledge to best determine the cause and severity of your pup`s pain.
Generally, dogs start feeling better within 48 hours. Total recovery takes some time, as the nail needs to re-grow so as to completely cover the vulnerable quick. Generally, this takes two weeks, according to Dr.
Long nails bend and catch on just about everything, causing both immediate and long term pain. It`s important to examine your dog`s nails and keep them adequately short to prevent pain and limping. Have your dog`s nails trimmed regularly, but if one breaks seek veterinary care immediately.
For dogs, they have to walk on the injured foot, so even a cracked nail is painful for them. Putting any pressure on that toe can really hurt and even the most stoic, tough-natured dogs will favor the injured foot. Understanding why broken nails can be so painful for dogs starts with a dog`s toenail anatomy.
Some dogs remain stoically quiet when they`re hurting but others, especially young dogs who have not experienced physical discomfort, may whimper and cry when they`re feeling pain. Your presence may provide comfort and lead them to stop whining.
What are the typical signs of pain in dogs? General behaviour: Shaking, flattened ears, low posture, aggression, grumpy temperament, panting or crying, excessive licking or scratching a specific area, reluctant to play, interact or exercise, lameness (limping), stiffness after rest, loss of appetite.
Dogs can limp for many reasons. Active or heavy pets can twist and strain things just like humans do. Any dog can jump or run and twist or turn a joint in a manner that causes temporary discomfort. Most injuries caused by such things are short-lived.
Lameness may be constant or occasional, mild to moderate, or severe with the dog unwilling to bear weight at all. Many small dogs live with this condition with it never resulting in arthritis nor pain, nor interfering with the dog`s life. However, in other cases, surgical treatment is necessary.
Dog`s Perspective

But the more you massage his legs, the less likely it is he will sprain or strain it while out exercising. If the injury has already occurred, then a good massage will help ease the muscles, reducing the pain and helping to speed Joey`s recovery along.

Rest and confinement are best for healing.

In many cases of limping, there will be no external signs. If this is the case for your dog and the limping is not severe, try to keep him quiet and comfortable. Encourage your dog to rest and do not take him for a walk or run. Do not allow your dog to exercise or jump up.

If your pet is limping but not showing any signs of pain, it is still worth contacting your vet for advice. Because dogs can`t speak, it can sometimes be difficult to spot when they`re in pain, whether it be as a result of injury or an underlying issue.
The treatment that your vet prescribes will depend on the cause of the limping and can be as simple as a few days of rest and some anti-inflammatories, or it may require surgery and rehabilitation. Bandages, splints, and physical therapy may be needed and sometimes a supplement for joint health is prescribed.
Generally, if your dog`s limp isn`t severe, you can just monitor your pup`s progress at home over 24-48 hours, watching for more symptoms or to see if the limp becomes more pronounced. Most of the time it`s best to err on the side of caution and schedule an appointment with your vet.
Dogs can start limping for reasons from minor issues such as a thorn in their paw or a more serious problem. Some of the most common explanations for dog limping include: Strains or tears (ligaments, tendons, muscles) Something painful stuck in their paw.
Filing is gentler, less anxiety producing for many dogs. With a clipper, the dog`s nail is squeezed. Many dogs do not like this sensation. So, you really have to stabilize the dog`s body as well as the paw being worked on.
Additionally, it is extremely painful for most dogs. If it is not possible to have your dog seen immediately, try to clean the area, place a bandage or light wrap over the area to keep it clean and dry, put an e-collar on them to make sure your dog can`t lick it, and schedule an appointment as soon as possible.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My dog has a split nail, what should I do?
ANSWER : A. Split or torn nails are very common in dogs, and treatment depends on the level of the tear. If the nail is split above the quik (blood supply to the nail) then it can be safely trimmed back and the torn part removed. You can find the quik in a dog’s nails by looking for a red or pink line in light colored nails, or a darker groove on the underside of dark colored nails.

If the tear is behind the quik or the nail is bleeding, stopping the bleeding with styptic powder or starches such as corn or rice starch can help. It is then best to bring your dog into your local vet to have the nail safely trimmed back. This may require anesthesia or sedation depending on the size of the tear to make the experience less painful for your dog. Your vet may also recommend antibiotics if the tear is large to prevent infection from taking hold until the nail can heal.

Once the torn part of the nail is removed, the nail should be able to begin growing back as normal. Regular nail trims to keep nails short and in shape can also help to prevent tears and splits in the future.

Q. My Pug has been limping for the last three days since I filed his nails down. What can I do for him to ease his pain?
ANSWER : A. Restrict his activity as much as you can. No excessive running, jumping or playing. If he doesn’t improve in a day or so, see your veterinarian. Do not give any medications to your pet without the advice of your veterinarian.

Read Full Q/A … : Causes of Limping in Dogs

Q. Shiba Inu. He periodically shakes and trembles, usually unrpovoked and seeming for no reason. Usually cuddling helps but not always. Becomes reclusive
ANSWER : A. I do find that Shiba Inu’s are a really sensitive breed. I think the first thing to rule out is pain. That could be pain from a muscle injury or even gastrointestinal pain. Try to pinpoint whether it occurs after a meal or not. He might be painful due to something going on in his GI tract, and the pain is at its worse after he eats.

I’ve also seen a lot of small breeds like Shibas get back pain, and shaking can definitely accompany that as well. If you haven’t see your vet who can perform a good physical exam and look for any signs of muscular pain along the spine or elsewhere. It’s not a bad idea at this point to consider doing some blood work just to screen for any problems that could be affecting organ function, for example.

If he’s healthy otherwise, I think it’s likely that there’s something that’s scaring him at home. These things can be really difficult to identify, and you have to be really aware and note exactly when the shaking occurs, how long it lasts, etc, and look for patterns. Dogs can hear things we can’t, and he may be hearing things you’re missing, and the noise is disturbing to him. Cuddling is a good idea, also working to distract him and desensitize him with toys and treats might help. But like I said above – definitely rule out pain first.

Q. What can I do about a broken toenail that has bent between the foot pad?
ANSWER : A. Broken toenails can be very painful in dogs if the “quick”, or nailbed is exposed. Typically they’re too painful to deal with at home if this is the case. If the nailbed isn’t involved and the area isn’t painful, take your dog’s nail clippers and trim away the excess part that has broken.

If the nailbed is exposed you’ll have to see your vet to deal with this. Usually we have to put local anesthetic in the area to numb the toe, then pull off the broken part of the nail. They usually need a bandage as well to protect the area from dirt, since the open nailbed is prone to infection, and is painful to walk on.

Q. My dog was fine yesterday and now she is limping. She had a grooming last Friday and was fine. I checked for tenderness and it appears to be the paw
ANSWER : A. Pain or injury to the foot can definitely cause a visible limp to appear on a dog. There are many causes such as sprains or strains in the joints including the ankle and toes (caused from falling, jumping or even just stepping wrong), breaks in the bones of the toe or ankle, or even infections such as bacterial infections, fungal infections (very common between the toes) and abscesses (an infection that forms under the skin and swells).

Common signs of this sort of foot problem include tenderness to the touch, redness, swelling, or heat with infection and dislocation with breaks. Bringing your dog into the vet is best if the symptoms do not subside after a day. An X-ray can be taken to look for breaks, and abscesses can be drained and then treated with antibiotics to allow healing. In minor cases such as breaks and sprains, your dog may just need a few days of bed/kennel rest with decreased activity, while in more serious injuries, the toes may need to be taped or casted together to allow healing. Your vet can also provide your dog with pain medication as needed to help her feel better as she heals.

Read Full Q/A … : Causes of Limping in Dogs

Q. Should cats be declawed, or should they have their claws capped?
ANSWER : A. Declawing is the removal of the claw and last bone of that digit, and I would definitely advise against it. Many people assume that declawing is more or less like trimming your nails or getting a manicure, but the truth is that it is a painful and permanently crippling procedure. In fact, some countries have outlawed this procedure.

Not only is it painful, but declawed cats often find it hard to function normally without the last bone and claw. As a result, many cats experience behavioral changes, such as becoming more aggressive.

Besides, if you’re planning to have your cat go outside anytime in its life, I would highly recommend never to declaw your cat, since declawing leaves your cat defenseless, especially while interacting with other animals.

If your cat is clawing up furniture or other objects, I would recommend giving your cat more toys to claw at. In this sense, buying multiple scratching posts would be a very good option.

You might also want to consider discouraging your cat from scratching furniture by using a loud, firm voice whenever the scratching begins.

So, to sum up, having your cat’s nails capped is definitely a better, more humane solution. However, this may not be necessary either if you provide enough toys to claw at, try to correct unwanted scratching behavior, and trim your cat’s claws regularly.

Q. I have tried everything to cut my dogs nails and it is impossible. Dremel and clippers. They are causing her a lot of pain. What should I do?
ANSWER : A. Nail trimming should not be painful unless you are getting the quicks. Try clipping or grinding the very smallest bit of nail that you can for a while, but you will have to do it every week so the nails don’t grow too long. Try having someone let her lick a cup of ice cream while you work–this may help to distract her. Get her used to your handling her feet often when you are not doing her nails.

Q. Need help, we have done flea bath ,sprayed the house and used charts ultra guard pro and still have fleas .how can we get rid of them
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.