Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Submit a stool sample to your vet to identify the specific parasite. Treat as indicated, repeating the treatment in 2-3 weeks if needed. If it is tapeworm, treat the pup and environment for fleas as they can reinfect the pup after deworming. Clean and sanitize the environment. Wash all bowls and non porous toys in hot, soapy water. Wash all bedding. Hard surfaces can be sanitized with a 1:30 dilution of household bleach and water. Allow for a 20 minute contact time. Pick up any feces immediately and keep the pup away from high traffic areas until the parasites are cleared and a monthly preventative is being given.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Your veterinarian may prescribe an oral or injectable dewormer that will kill the adult and larval worms. They may also recommend starting your dog on monthly topical or oral flea prevention, since tapeworm infections can recur if there are fleas in your dog`s environment.
Puppies will usually poop worms for a couple of days as the parasites die off between 2 and 14 hours. However, it`s not unusual for worms to still be pooped out for up to a week after deworming.
Although roundworm and tapeworm rarely cause serious illness in adult dogs, they can cause very serious problems for puppies – such as dehydration, anaemia, gut blockages and even death.
Treatment of Worm Infestations in Dogs

Treatment of most types of worms comes in the form of a deworming medication, either given orally or injected. Some dewormers will dissolve the worms so that you will not see them passed in the stool, such as those for tapeworms. In many cases, multiple treatments will be needed.

NO! People may believe because worms are usually harmless in humans, that they`re probably not too dangerous in dogs either and that they can rid themselves of them, but this is not the case. Dogs cannot get rid of worms themselves. Medical assistance will be required to some extent.
Once worms are suspected to be affecting your dog, seek veterinary guidance right away for an exact diagnosis and treatment regimen. De-worming medication is usually necessary, and in severe cases, your dog may need to be hospitalized for treatment and observation.
The guidelines recommend deworming puppies at 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks of age. If the breeder has not already completed this, we will recommend deworming the puppy every 2 weeks for a total of 4 treatments. If the breeder has already done 1 or 2 treatments, we will prescribe further treatments to make a total of 4.
Once you`ve given a dog dewormer, you may see worms in your dog`s poop. Mostly they will be dead worms, but live ones can also be seen. It`s crucial that you clean up these poops thoroughly and quickly, so your dog does not become reinfected. Other side effects of deworming a dog include diarrhea.
How do dogs get worms? Many intestinal worms spread their eggs via their host`s stool. So, if your dog is interested in the poop of other dogs, cats, and wild animals, they could get infected that way. Plus, wherever dogs or other animals go to the bathroom, worm eggs can be left behind in the soil.
Signs Your Dog Has Worms

Severe cases of heartworm can be fatal, and these worms often don`t produce any symptoms at all. However, a persistent cough, exercise intolerance, difficulty breathing, and weight loss can all be signs of a heartworm infestation.

Dogs who have worms may have symptoms ranging from diarrhea and abdominal pain to a pot-bellied appearance.
Worming your dog once may not be enough to fully protect them from worms. In the case of some wormers, once the treatment wears off, your dog may be re-infected. Many wormers only kill the adult worms that are in the gut at the time of treatment.
A deworming treatment takes only 24 hours!

In this case, it takes a few weeks for adult worms to redevelop in the dog`s intestine and for contagious eggs to be excreted. For roundworms this is approx. four weeks, for tapeworms this is usually longer and less than four weeks for the more rarely occurring hookworms.

Your dog may be infected with roundworms from the time it is born because often the mother passes the worms to the puppy while it is still in her body. Roundworms can also develop in a puppy after it is born when the puppy eats larvated eggs from the environment or drinks worm larvae (young worms) in the mother`s milk.
Yes. These worms, like other infections that humans can get from animals, are called zoonotic (zoe-o-NOT-ick) infections or zoonoses (zoe-o-NO-sees). By learning about these infections and how to prevent them, you can help protect your pets, yourself, and your family.
Coughing, diarrhea, vomiting and lethargy are the general signs the dog has worms. Other symptoms depend on the type of worm. For example, if your dog has a tapeworm, clear identifiers can be rapid weight loss or what appears to be grains of rice in their stool.
You`ll likely need to give your doctor a stool sample for a few months to make sure all the worms are gone.
Roundworms can complete their life cycle in immature dogs, but as the puppy`s immune system matures (usually by six months of age), the larval stages of the roundworm will become enclosed in a cyst in the puppy`s muscles. They can remain encysted in the dog`s tissues for months or years.
Puppy Worming Schedule

Once you have your puppy at home, you will most likely be given a wormer by your veterinarian. After worming them weekly until twelve weeks, you should worm every month until they are 6 months old, and then after that every 3 -6 months.

Puppies and Kittens need to be dewormed more often: It is recommended that your puppy or kitten is dewormed every 2 weeks until they reach 3 months of age. Puppies and kittens are usually born with parasites passed on from mom (even if mom is dewormed) before they are born.
You may be surprised to still see live worms in your dog`s feces after deworming them, but this is normal. While this can be an unpleasant image, it`s actually a good thing — it means the worms are no longer living inside your dog!
If you have worms, a GP will prescribe medicine to kill them. You take this for 1 to 3 days. The people you live with may also need to be treated. Any worms in your gut will eventually pass out in your poo.
Dogs that are lethargic and less active than normal may be showing symptoms of worms. The worms cause this lack of energy by taking blood and nutrients from your dog. The hookworm is a common parasite that is dangerous enough to kill puppies due to the loss of blood.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My puppy will be 8 weeks old tomorrow. I’ve had her for a week now, and she still isn’t responding to any training or her name. What can I do?
ANSWER : A. Try clicker training her to come when called. Clicker training is an effective way of training you dog to not only come when called, but can be used to teach a variety of tricks and tasks.

Have treats on hand that you know she loves, then simply click and treat. She will come to associate the sound with getting a treat. Start putting distance between you so she has to come to you. Call and click and when she comes to you for that treat, treat him and give her lots of praise. Move to hiding somewhere in the house, call and click. When she comes to you reliably inside when you call, click and treat. When this behavior is consistent, move outdoors with a very long leash. Call and click, if she doesn’t respond, give a light tug on the leash. If she takes even a single step toward you, click, treat and lots of praise. Keep doing this until she comes eagerly. Next, try her off-leash in a securely fenced area. Call and click. At this point she should be responding well and coming easily to the call and click. If she does not, go back to the last step she performed reliably and work on that again until she responds well. Eventually, you can start not treating her every time, but still praise her. Gradually lessen the frequency of the treats until she comes just to the click and praise.

Keep training sessions short, ten or fifteen minutes to start, no more than 30 minutes at a time and do it a few times a day. Try not to do it any time she is overly excited so that she can pay attention to you. Always end a training session on a good note, even if it is just getting him to do something she already does well on command. And never, NEVER punish a dog when they come to you, no matter how far they’ve made you chase them, no matter how frustrated and angry you might be. That teaches your dog that coming to you is a bad thing.

Q. We have a 4 yr old lab-pit mix we raise from 6 weeks.If my husband tries to take hin by the collar and make him go out to pottie he growls.Problem?
ANSWER : A. This is not good behavior. Rather than take him by the collar, call him to come with you. If he’s not good about coming when called, you can work on that. Keeps treats on hand to to entice him out and reward him when he does go potty and he’ll come to look forward to it. Clicker training is another great way to teach a dog all kinds of things, from obedience to tricks.

Have treats on hand that you know he loves, then simply click and treat. He will come to associate the sound with getting a treat. Start putting distance between you so he has to come to you. Call and click and when he comes to you for that treat, treat him and give him lots of praise. Move to hiding somewhere in the house, call and click. When he comes to you reliably inside when you call, click and treat. When this behavior is consistent, move outdoors with a very long leash. Call and click, if he doesn’t respond, give a light tug on the leash. If he takes even a single step toward you, click, treat and lots of praise. Keep doing this until he comes eagerly. Next, try him off-leash in a securely fenced area. Call and click. At this point he should be responding well and coming easily to the call and click. If he does not, go back to the last step he performed reliably and work on that again until he responds well. Eventually, you can start not treating him every time, but still praise him. Gradually lessen the frequency of the treats until he comes just to the click and praise.

Keep training sessions short, ten or fifteen minutes to start, no more than 30 minutes at a time and do it a few times a day. Try not to do it any time he is overly excited so that he can pay attention to you. Always end a training session on a good note, even if it is just getting him to do something he already does well on command. And never, NEVER punish a dog when they come to you, no matter how far they’ve made you chase them, no matter how frustrated and angry you might be. That teaches your dog that coming to you is a bad thing.

Read Full Q/A … : Causes of Limping in Dogs

Q. My pup has been treated 3 times for worms and still has them. I’ve never seen worms so bad. What do I do to get rid of them?
ANSWER : A. Submit a stool sample to your vet to identify the specific parasite. Treat as indicated, repeating the treatment in 2-3 weeks if needed. If it is tapeworm, treat the pup and environment for fleas as they can reinfect the pup after deworming. Clean and sanitize the environment. Wash all bowls and non porous toys in hot, soapy water. Wash all bedding. Hard surfaces can be sanitized with a 1:30 dilution of household bleach and water. Allow for a 20 minute contact time. Pick up any feces immediately and keep the pup away from high traffic areas until the parasites are cleared and a monthly preventative is being given.

Q. What’s the best way to train a dog to use a lead again?
ANSWER : A. It depends on how serious your issue is. If you need to start from scratch: Bring out the leash, place it on the ground. Click and treat your dog. Say his name, work on attention, click and treat for attention. Work with the cheese sticks, or with some chicken.. something stinky, soft, and high value. Allow him to sniff the leash, praise him, click, treat, click, treat. Pick up the leash, click treat him. Hook the leash to his collar and allow the leash to drag, click treat him. Have him just follow you around, click and treat him to hold his attention.

Then, pick up the leash, click and treat him. Then drop the leash again, click and treat. Take baby steps. Then, hold the leash while you take a step, click and treat him for following. Open the front door, click and treat him. Then, take off the leash, click and treat him, and end training.

Pick training back up in an hour, and do the same exact thing from start to finish, only this time, “finish” will be you two going outside, you clicking and treating him a bunch, and then you bringing him back inside. Work your way up slowly. You can’t expect to just bring him outside and bring him on a walk right away.

When outdoors, use a front hooking harness like the Sensible/Sensation harnesses: http://www.softouchconcepts.com/index.php/product-53/sense-ible-harness / http://www.softouchconcepts.com/index.php/product-53/sense-ation-harness. These harnesses will eliminate the pulling power of your pup in a positive way. This will put you in control without the use of force. Carry high value treats with you everywhere, and offer them for good walking behavior – treats like white meat chicken, cooked fish, turkey pepperoni, turkey bacon, diced ham, mozzarella cheese sticks, hotdogs, all cut into tiny little pieces. The more you work on walking on-leash/attention indoors, the better it will be outdoors, remember that.

Q. My Bulldog puppy growls, barks and even tries to bite me when I say “no” to him. What can I do?
ANSWER : A. First, avoid scolding him and acting aggressively towards him if you don’t want him to be acting aggressively towards you. There are other methods you can use to communicate to your dog that you don’t want him to continue doing what he is doing. I recommend you stop telling him “no”, scolding him, or raising your voice at him. Everything coming from you should be 100% positive and 100% calm.

Try to figure out ways to clearly communicate what you want to your dog. If you want your dog to leave something or someone alone, I strongly suggest teaching your dog commands like “leave it”. Here is a link to a video in which I explain how to do it:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=R1TS5nA7z5Q

Another thing I suggest you use is a no-reward marker. This clearly communicates when your dog has done something wrong. No-reward markers have to be introduced during your training sessions. You should be doing at least three training sessions per day, that are something like 3-10 minutes long (working on different things each training session). If you are teaching your dog something BRAND NEW, do not use the no-reward marker, as you do not want to discourage your dog from performing behaviors for you. Use the no-reward marker for known behaviors only. Here is another helpful video about this:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=sdU5a6fXKlg

Lure each new behavior (as shown in the video) using high value treats. Let’s say you’re working on “down” which is a behavior your dog knows fairly well. Present the treat to your dog. Ask your dog to “down” (only ask once). If he does not go “down” immediately, say, “uh-oh” or “eh-eh” in a gentle tone, and then place the treat behind your back. This communicates to your dog that they did something to make the treat go away.

After you place the treat behind your back to show your pup “that was wrong” you need to communicate to your pup “let’s try again” by getting your pup to walk around for a second, and then start the behavior all over again. If your puppy is very young, chances are you haven’t taught him a solid “down” behavior yet. So, as I said, do not use this method until you have lured each new behavior as shown in the video.

This is the order in which you should teach behaviors: Lure using a high value treat as shown in the video. After a few successful food lures, lure with an empty hand. If the pup is successful with the empty hand lure, reward with lots of treats. If the pup is unsuccessful, then go back to food-luring a couple more times. After a few successful empty-hand lures, you can begin to add the cue. Say “sit”, then lure with an empty hand, and then reward. Once your pup understands the cue, begin to work on the no-reward marker.

Q. My puppy refuses to walk outside on the leash. This only happens when we’re outside… Is it stubbornness or fear?
ANSWER : A. It is never stubbornness. Dogs are not stubborn, they can’t be. Dogs do not generalize well, and dogs display fearful behavior that appears to be stubbornness. Absolutely NEVER force this dog to walk outside when he is uncomfortable with doing so.. the more you force him to do it, opposition reflex – the more he will resist. The more he resists and is forced into it, the less he learns about being comfortable, and the more he becomes fearful of you and of the situation.

What you can do is carry extremely high value treats outside with you. Things like cooked white meat chicken, cooked fish, turkey pepperoni, turkey bacon, diced ham, mozzarella cheese sticks – all cut up into tiny little pea-sized pieces. You can also use peanut butter in a squeeze tube. First, put on the leash indoors and begin feeding him the treats. Help him make positive associations with having the leash put on. Then, take the leash off, and start over in 10min. Put the leash on, feed treats, walk to the door, open the door, feed treats, close door, take off leash. Start over in 10min. Put on leash, feed treats, go to door, feed treats, open door, feed treats, go outside, feed tons of treats and praise. Keep Titus in his comfort zone. If he doesn’t want to go far, just feed him tons of treats where he IS comfortable going. Make sure everything is calm/happy/positive. I bet in a week of doing this, he will be happy with walk further and further all of the time. If ever he is uncomfortable, feed him lots of treats for being a brave boy, and then turn around and go back home. It’s all about keeping him in his comfort zone.. it’s all about remaining within his threshold and never forcing him to feed uncomfortable.

This is very common for puppies. The world is scary! It’s brand new to them, and it’s up to you to make their interactions and discoveries positive, happy, calm, and to never force them into anything.

Q. Whenever I take my dog on walks he always barks at people and others dogs in my neighborhood. What should I do to resolve the problem
ANSWER : A. The very first thing to do is to make sure your dog is getting sufficient physical and mental exercise every day. A tired dog is a good, happy dog and one who is less likely to bark from boredom or frustration. Depending on his breed, age, and health, your dog may require several long walks as well as a good game of chasing the ball and playing with some interactive toys.

Figure out what he gets out of barking and remove it. Don’t give your dog the opportunity to continue the barking behavior.

Ignore your dog’s barking for as long as it takes him to stop. That means don’t give him attention at all while he’s barking. Your attention only rewards him for being noisy. Don’t talk to, don’t touch, or even look at him. When he finally quiets, even to take a breath, reward him with a treat. To be successful with this method, you must wait as long as it takes for him to stop barking. Yelling at him is the equivalent of barking with him.

Get your dog accustomed to whatever causes him to bark. Start with whatever makes him bark at a distance. It must be far enough away that he doesn’t bark when he sees it. Feed him lots of good treats. Move the stimulus a little closer (perhaps as little as a few inches or a few feet to start) and feed treats. If the stimulus moves out of sight, stop giving your dog treats. You want your dog to learn that the appearance of the stimulus leads to good things.

Teach your dog the ‘quiet’ command. Oddly, the first step is to teach your dog to bark on command. Give your dog the command to “speak,” wait for him to bark two or three times, and then stick a tasty treat in front of his nose. When he stops barking to sniff the treat, praise him and give him the treat. Repeat until he starts barking as soon as you say “speak.” Once your dog can reliably bark on command, teach him the “quiet” command. In a calm environment with no distractions, tell him to “speak.” When he starts barking, say “quiet” and stick a treat in front of his nose. Praise him for being quiet and give him the treat.

As in all training, always end training on a good note, even if it is just for obeying something very simple, like the ‘sit’ command. If you dog regresses in training, go back to the last thing he did successfully and reinforce that before moving on again. Keep sessions short, 15-20 minutes max, and do this several times a day.

Q. Cat showing no signs of fleas, some scratching, doing well.Found a worm the other day.Does the cat have fleas again?Can garlic in catfood help?dangers
ANSWER : A. I’m sorry that you are having itching issues! Those can be tough to figure out! Fleas can also be a tough issue. They are hard get rid of and hard control for sure! If your cat is itching and you are finding worms there is a chance that you may have fleas. It depends on the type of worms of your finding. If the worm was a small, flat worm that resembled a grain of rice, I would say for sure that you most likely have fleas. This was most likely a tape worm segment. Tapeworms are the result of flea infestations. If the worm was longer and white, then you could be looking at another type of worm such as a roundworm. The best option would be to take your kitty into the vet where they can run a fecal test and see exactly which kind of worm eggs are in the sample. This way they can treat your cat for worms and solve one of your issues!
Now on the your next questions: the Garlic. Garlic is actually TOXIC to your cat so I would recommend to not use it under any circumstances! There are some great products that your vet can recommend for fleas that won’t harm your kitty. One that works great and actually takes care of fleas and all sorts of worms is called Revolution. It is a monthly topical solution and cats tend to tolerate it really well. I hope this was helpful and I hope your kitty feels better soon!