Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. blood in stool is a very concerning sign especially if connected with vomiting and lethargy. see a vet as soon as possible to check what is going on.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

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There`s blood in my dog`s stool or vomit, what should I do? Regardless of the cause, bloody diarrhea or vomiting is an emergency that could potentially be fatal if left untreated, so immediate veterinary care is called for.
Causes of bloody diarrhea can include small, harmless masses; major tumors; toxic substances; or simply emotional upset.
The first thing you should do if you find blood in your dog`s stool, whether the stool is formed or loose (like diarrhea), is to call your veterinarian. Dogs can`t verbalize when they aren`t feeling well. Finding blood in dog poop is alarming, and it`s also a clear sign that something is going on with your pup.
Regardless of the cause, bloody diarrhea or vomiting is an emergency that could potentially be fatal if left untreated, so immediate veterinary care is called for. At Northeast Veterinary Referral Hospital, our specialists and emergency vets are here to offer advanced care for pets with internal health conditions.
The prognosis for dogs with HGE is generally good if they are treated early and aggressively and most dogs recover in 2-3 days. The survival rate of HGE in dogs can be as high as 95% with the appropriate treatments and therapies. Dogs however that have hypovolemic shock and sepsis can have a guarded to poor prognosis.
There are many reasons your dog`s poo may have blood in it. These can range from worms to gastroenteritis and can also be caused by food allergies or eating something they shouldn`t have. But it`s important to note that, if your dog is well, this is usually nothing to worry about.
Any time that your dog has bloody diarrhea you should take them to the vet as soon as you can. This is because bloody diarrhea in dogs is usually a sign that they are experiencing a serious medical issue. Your vet may want you to bring them in a sample of your dog`s diarrhea or take a picture of it as well.
Acute hemorrhagic diarrhea syndrome (AHDS), also known as hemorrhagic gastroenteritis (HGE), is an acute (sudden) disorder of dogs characterized by vomiting and bloody diarrhea. Some dogs may have a painful abdomen, decreased appetite, lethargy, or fever. Most cases occur without warning in otherwise healthy dogs.
Intestinal Parasites: Worms and protozoa, such as hookworms and Giardia, can cause bloody diarrhea. Parasites often feed off and irritate the intestinal wall. Bacterial and Viral Infections: Infections like Salmonella, E. coli, and parvovirus, can cause bloody diarrhea.
Some of the signs of parvovirus include lethargy; loss of appetite; abdominal pain and bloating; fever or low body temperature (hypothermia); vomiting; and severe, often bloody, diarrhea. Persistent vomiting and diarrhea can cause rapid dehydration, and damage to the intestines and immune system can cause septic shock.
Recovery time usually is within a few days but sometimes can last a week or more. If left untreated, gastroenteritis can worsen and cause severe dehydration which can be life-threatening.
HGE will not go away on its own, so if your dog experiences bloody diarrhea for more than a day, you shouldn`t wait any longer to take them to the vet. Unfortunately, there are many causes of bloody diarrhea in dogs, so HGE isn`t always obvious to pet parents.
A bland diet for a day or two may help to resolve your dog`s issue. Plain-cooked white rice with a little chicken and some canned plain pumpkin (not pie filling) may help to make your dog`s tummy feel better. Once your dog feels better gradually reintroduce their regular food.
Regardless of the type of blood you see in your dog`s stool or vomit it is important to contact your vet, or your nearest emergency vet right away. Bloody diarrhea or vomiting can be a veterinary emergency requiring immediate care.
Dogs can have blood on the stool for a variety of reasons. One of the most common reasons include colitis (inflammation of the colon). Colitis can arise from several things including bacterial overgrowth, parasitism, inflammatory bowl disease, or food allergy.
The scent generally associated with parvo is caused by blood in the stool. Dogs with bloody stools because of hookworms have precisely the same smell. MORE IMPORTANTLY, if a puppy is diagnosed with Parvo BEFORE there is blood in the stool, the antivirals` effectiveness is MUCH GREATER.
The near-death signs of parvo include severe lethargy, continuous bloody diarrhea, anorexia, and bloody vomiting. You may not want to admit it to yourself, but this is the point of no return. So consider doing a humane thing by putting your puppy to sleep.
Your puppy will vomit and have diarrhea if canine parvovirus is present in their system. Vomit may be clear or a yellow or brown color, and diarrhea will often contain blood and be a light yellow or mustard colored hue.
Parvo smell has a unique very bad-smelling poop that is not easy to forget. The smell has been described as metallic, with hints of blood stench since the virus affects the intestinal walls, and a seemingly sweet scent.
Giardia infection in dogs may lead to weight loss, chronic intermittent diarrhea, and fatty stool. The stool may range from soft to watery, often has a greenish tinge, and occasionally contains blood. Infected dogs tend to have excess mucus in their feces.
In addition to seeing worms in your dog`s poop, intestinal worms may also cause: Mucusy or bloody diarrhea. Vomiting.
It is therefore imperative that you take your cat or dog immediately to a veterinarian if you notice signs of uncharacteristic tiredness, difficulty breathing, weakness of body, bloody diarrhea, or collapse.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. How do I get my dog to stop chewing on things? I kennel her when I leave for a few hours, but I can’t go to the mailbox without her eating something.
ANSWER : A. If she’s young, then this is just normal puppy behavior. Don’t worry about it. The thing about puppies is, they explore using their mouths. If your puppy grabs a coat hanger, or a slipper, you should roll up a newspaper, and smack yourself on the head with it for leaving those things out.. your puppy is going to explore things, that’s normal! It is 100% up to YOU to keep those things away from your puppy when your puppy is unsupervised… even for just a moment.

Remember to never scold your puppy for grabbing these things. They are just curious little cuties, and they don’t chew things up to bother us.. Dogs do not have intentional thought, so they aren’t ever doing anything ON PURPOSE to us.. The most important thing you can do when your puppy is chewing something you don’t want her to be chewing is TRADE her the inappropriate item with a toy of hers, so she understands “no honey, that isn’t what puppies chew on… THIS is what puppies chew on!” and then begin playing with her using her toy to show her that TOYS ARE FUN.. Way more fun than a boring ol’ coat hanger.

Another helpful thing you can do is have two bags of toys. In each bag is many different kinds of toys. Lots of chew toys, lots of soft squeaky toys, lots of rope-type toys, a bunch of balls.. All kinds of things! For one week you have bag#1’s toys out for your puppy to play with.. At the end of the one week, you collect those toys, and you bring out bag#2! The toys will be more interesting/feel like new to your puppy, which will in-turn, make her chew less inappropriate things. Her toys are too fun to care about that dumb Wii-mote that you left laying around.

Hope this helps!

Q. Which common foods are poisonous to pets?
ANSWER : A. That’s a great question. As responsible pet owners we need to be aware of food items that can be harmful to our canine or feline companions. Here are some of the most common foods proven to cause illness in our animals at home:

Chocolate: A favorite and irresistible treat amongst most humans, chocolate is considered toxic to dogs. In very small amounts it is usually not a huge issue, but with larger volumes and with darker chocolates pet owners should be concerned. Chocolate contains methylxanthine theobromine, which is similar to caffeine. Chocolate ingestion can cause vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity, issues with normal heartbeats, seizures, and in some severe cases, death. It is best to keep your favorite chocolate treats in a good hiding spot and out of reach of your dog or cat.

Grapes and raisins: Dogs should not consume grapes and raisins because of the risk of acute kidney failure. Most dogs experiencing grape or raisin toxicity will begin to have vomiting and/or diarrhea within 6-12 hours of ingestion. Other abnormal clinical signs include lethargy, abdominal pain, dehydration, and tremors. Kidney failure develops within 24-72 hours of the initial ingestion. There are some dogs that do not experience these devastating side effects. It is best to contact your veterinarian or veterinary emergency facility if you believe your pet has ingested grapes or raisins.

Garlic and onions: We often forget that our meals contain these two popular ingredients and will allow our furry companions a few bites or licks. Onion and garlic both can cause a type of poisoning that results in damage to red blood cells, making them more likely to rupture. They can also cause stomach upset and mouth irritation. Look for pale gums, increased breathing or drooling or any vomiting or diarrhea.

Bread dough: Unbaked bread dough is considered poisonous to our pets. The bread dough, when ingested, expands in the stomach because of the warm and moist environment. This can lead to a bloated or even twisted stomach. In addition yeast is often added to our baking products to help get bread to rise, and when this yeast is fermented it produces both carbon dioxide and alcohol. The alcohol produced can be absorbed into the bloodstream and causes dangerous drops in blood sugar, blood pressure and body temperature. Common clinical signs include vomiting or retching, distension of the stomach, weakness and collapse.

Macadamia nuts: Ingestion of these nuts are not proven to be fatal in dogs but can cause them to experience uncomfortable clinical sings, including fever, joint stiffness, vomiting, tremors and difficulty walking, especially in their hind legs. Often your pet will start to feel better after about 48 hours, but supportive veterinary care (such as pain medication) may help ease their discomfort.

Xylitol: The most common ingredient used in sugar-free gum is xylitol, which is a non-caloric sweetener. It is also found in some oral rinses, toothpastes and vitamins. Xylitol and dogs do not mix – it can cause a dangerous drop in blood sugars levels. Dogs will often display signs of disorientation, black tarry stool, tremors and seizures. If severe enough some dogs have developed liver failure. Keep your gum away from your canine companion.

Avocados: Avocados are not actually poisonous to dogs or cats but as many veterinarians can tell you the avocado pits can cause a foreign body obstruction. Avocados contain persin, which is actually toxic to the majority of pet birds. The abnormal clinical signs associated with avocado ingestion in birds include, respiratory distress, inability to perch, liver and kidney failure and sudden death.

Go forth and enjoy your favorite foods, but keep in mind which foods you should avoid sharing with your furry family members. Whenever in doubt, contact your veterinarian for healthy and safe food suggestions.

Q. Wants to go out very frequently. Has fecal matter attached to anus but won’t let me remove it. She won’t sleep and wants to stay on my lap.
ANSWER : A. So I’m hearing a couple of problems going on. Frequent defecation with diarrhea (I’m assuming, since there’s fecal matter attached and the anus, and typically it only “sticks” when it’s soft) and lethargy/clinginess. Pretty general signs, however let’s focus on the diarrhea and assume it’s a GI thing. You didn’t tell me whether this is a cat or dog but I’ll assume dog since you said she goes outside to defecate.

Diarrhea may or may not be a sign of a serious disease. I don’t get especially concerned with one or two episodes in an animal who seems to feel completely normally otherwise, but what you’re describing sounds concerning. Your dog is restless, can’t get comfortable, and is somewhat needy – all of those indicate discomfort to me.

Without knowing how old your dog is it’s pretty difficult to get specific about causes, but I’ll mention some possibilities. Certainly parasites, including giardia, can cause diarrhea, as well as bacterial or viral infections in the gut. Indiscriminate eating, which dogs are master of, can cause diarrhea. Food allergies or sensitivities as well as inflammatory bowel disease are on the list. More serious causes include liver, kidney, or pancreatic disease, as well as intestinal cancers.

I’m hoping this has only been going on for a little while. You can try feeding a bland/high-fiber diet of boiled white meat chicken and white rice (25% chicken and 75% rice) in small (1/4 to 1/2 cup) amounts frequently (every two hours). If the diarrhea doesn’t resolve in 12 hours see a veterinarian. If she’s vomiting or won’t eat at all, see a vet sooner.

Read Full Q/A … : Leerburg

Q. My puppy is urinating a lot. And the lady I gave one of the puppies to said she thinks her puppy has diabetes could my puppy have it to
ANSWER : A. It is not likely that either one of these puppies has diabetes. It is very uncommon for a puppy that young to have diabetes. If your puppy is straining to urinate or is urinating very small amounts frequently and cannot seem to wait for very long between urination, he may have a urinary tract infection. It is quite possible that your puppy is completely normal. I would suggest an exam with your veterinarian and discuss the behavior with them. They may suggest a urinalysis. Your puppy should be going to the vet at 3 week intervals for vaccinations at this age, so you can discuss it when he has his next set of vaccines. The other person with the other puppy should also be taking hers to a vet for proper immunizations and she should also discuss her concerns with her vet.

Q. I have 2 puppies that I think may have parvo, the little one is throwing up thick bubbly puke and watery stool. Can the vaccinated mom still get sick?
ANSWER : A. If you suspect one or both of your puppies have parvo, it is best to bring them into a vet for care. Parvo is a very serious and contagious disease and it can kill puppies without proper treatment.

As Parvo IS very contagious, it is best to keep the sick puppy isolated from any other dogs in the house. While your adult dog is less likely to get ill due to vaccination, no vaccine is 100%. Your other puppies if not vaccinated are also very likely to get ill. Be sure to thoroughly clean any surfaces your sick dog comes into contact with as Parvo can live in the environment for up to several months if not properly cleaned.

If your puppy is very ill, your vet can run a fecal test to look for Parvo. Parvo symptoms usually include vomiting and diarrhea that often is blood-tinged. Parvo can cause dogs to become very dehydrated and unable to keep food, liquids or medications down and usually require hospitalization and IV fluids to provide medications and nutrition while they are ill.

Q. My puppy is throwing up her food this morning and yellow foamy stuff. Please help!
ANSWER : A. If the vomiting has only occurred once, it may be due to the fact that there was something causing a minor upset stomach in your pup. Yellow foam is often acid, and tummies that are upset or that have been empty for too long can cause this to appear in vomit. It may just be that your puppy needs an extra meal in the day to help keep her stomach happy. Eating a meal too quickly can also cause a pup to vomit up undigested food and foam, and feeding smaller meals more often, or slowing down your dog’s eating can help.

If the vomiting has only happened once, pick up your puppy’s food for an hour or two and then offer a bland meal of plain boiled chicken and plain rice. These bland ingredients can help settle upset stomachs while being enticing “people food”. If the vomiting does not occur again, you can return to a normal feeding schedule.

However, if the vomiting continues, worsens, or new symptoms appear along with it, then it is a good idea to schedule an appointment with your vet to rule out any more serious causes.

Q. Hi I have a kelpie puppy I fed her two different puppy food one optimum puppy and the othe purina supercoat but now she vomiting what do I do
ANSWER : A. Withhold food for 12-24 hours. Allow small amounts of water or unflavored PediaLyte. Resume feeding a bland diet ( boiled boneless / skinless chicken and plain white rice) in small, frequent amounts. If the vomiting stops, transition to the regular diet. Choose one of the puppy foods you are currently feeding. If she begins vomiting on that diet, withhold food as described above until the vomiting stops, feed a bland diet then resume feeding the other diet. If the vomiting continues, see your veterinarian.

Q. Ten month puppy had vomiting was just mucus and liquid, tonight had diarrhea with what looked to be blood clots in it but wasn’t red when cleaned
ANSWER : A. Puppies do tend to pick up a lot of tummy bugs as they are always licking and eating everything. If it is just one episode of vomiting and diarrhea and it is still fairly bright then I would try feeding a bland diet for a couple of days such as chicken or white fish. If the vomiting or diarrhea continues or it is very lethargic then you should see your vet as soon as possible as I would be concerned about dehydration.