Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. It is not likely that either one of these puppies has diabetes. It is very uncommon for a puppy that young to have diabetes. If your puppy is straining to urinate or is urinating very small amounts frequently and cannot seem to wait for very long between urination, he may have a urinary tract infection. It is quite possible that your puppy is completely normal. I would suggest an exam with your veterinarian and discuss the behavior with them. They may suggest a urinalysis. Your puppy should be going to the vet at 3 week intervals for vaccinations at this age, so you can discuss it when he has his next set of vaccines. The other person with the other puppy should also be taking hers to a vet for proper immunizations and she should also discuss her concerns with her vet.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Puppy diabetes symptoms are similar to those of older dogs. However, diabetes in puppies is not very common. If you suspect that your puppy may have diabetes, it is important to take them to the vet and have them tested, multiple times.
When the blood glucose reaches a certain level, the glucose overflows into the urine (this is called glucosuria) and draws large volumes of water with it. This is why diabetic pets often drink more water and urinate more frequently and in larger amounts.
The most common signs of diabetes in dogs are: Increased Urination/Thirst: When your dog has high blood sugar, his kidneys are forced to work overtime to get rid of the excess glucose through his urine. This means your dog will urinate and drink a lot more than usual.
Diabetes is a chronic disease that can affect dogs and cats and other animals (including apes, pigs, and horses) as well as humans. Although diabetes can`t be cured, it can be managed very successfully. Diabetes mellitus, or “sugar diabetes,” is the type of diabetes seen most often in dogs.
Canine diabetes can be found in 1 out of every 200 dogs. It`s usually hereditary and must be diagnosed and controlled because it is life-threatening.
Dog diabetes, or `canine diabetes`, is caused by either a lack of insulin in your dog`s body or, in some cases, an `inadequate` biological response to it. When your dog eats, the food is broken down. One of the components of their food, glucose, is carried to their cells by insulin.
Restricting the amount of water your diabetic pet has access can lead to life threatening consequences. Your dog`s body is trying to combat the high blood glucose level by expelling the excess sugar out of its body through the urine. Once your dog is regulated, this will subside.
It`s true that a dog can pass away within a month or two of beginning to show signs of diabetes, but many will live for a year or two after diagnosis with appropriate treatment. Some do very well for even longer, particularly if they have a dedicated pet parent who can continue to provide the care they need.
A Visit to Your Veterinarian

Your veterinarian will first test your dog for the presence of glucose and ketones in the urine. If indicated, the next step is to measure your dog`s blood glucose concentration. The diagnosis only becomes definite when glucose is found both in the urine and at a high level in the blood.

“If diabetes goes untreated, the dog can go into diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), where you see vomiting, lethargy and a poor appetite. At this point, it`s an emergency situation that requires hospitalization.” (Other DKA dog diabetes symptoms include panting and weakness.)
The Influence Of Diet On Diabetes In Dogs. Diet doesn`t directly cause Type 1 diabetes, but it does cause many other risk factors: obesity, inflammation, pancreatitis, metabolic syndrome and autoimmune disease.
Checking the blood glucose levels at home is easy and can provide more accurate results than when the pet arrives at the veterinary hospital. Many pets become stressed when visiting the hospital, which can temporarily elevate the blood glucose and give an inaccurate reflection of the diabetes.
“This can happen quickly and is seen within one to two months after development of diabetes.” So if your dog is showing any symptoms, it`s important to schedule a dog diabetes test with your vet right away. But diabetes doesn`t have to hold your pup back.
Walk the Dog

Regular exercise will also help your pooch lose weight and lower blood sugar levels. It`s best to have your dog exercise for the same length of time and at the same intensity every day. An unusually long or vigorous workout could cause blood sugar levels to drop too low.

A diabetic dog`s life expectancy will depend on various factors, such as breed, age, general health, weight and lifestyle. In general, dogs with diabetes can live (uncomfortably) anywhere from two months to two years if not given insulin.
Unfortunately diabetes is not curable in dogs, and the vast majority of diabetic dogs require insulin injections for life once diagnosed. However, addressing underlying causes, as well as spaying females and treating Cushing`s disease, can allow the diabetes to be more easily and successfully controlled.
Metabolic issues: Dogs can also develop longer-term health problems if regularly fed sugar. These include weight gain, obesity, high blood sugar, diabetes, and heart disease.
The clinical signs may vary, are often non-specific, and can wax and wane. Clinical signs may include altered mentation and behavior, seizures, syncope, muscle twitching/fasciculations, somnolence, exercise intolerance, muscle tremors, collapse, ataxia, weakness, and impaired vision.
A diabetic pet needs to eat before you administer insulin. For best results, inject insulin within one hour after feeding to prevent blood sugar spikes. Many pet owners like to administer insulin while their pet eats to take advantage of that distraction, but, if you do that, ensure your pet eats all her food.
Called `polyuria and polydipsia` (PUPD), they frequently appear in combination. In general, increased production of urine is the primary cause, and dogs drink more to make up for the water being excreted. Hormone imbalance from endocrine disease and kidney failure are the most common reasons for polyuria.
Severe hypoglycemia resulting from too much insulin can cause seizures, irreversible brain damage, and death. Warning signs include nervousness, hyperexcitability, anxiety, vocalization, muscle tremors, lack of coordination, wobbliness (the dog may appear drunk), and pupil dilation.
If you miss a dose, contact your veterinarian for advice on when to give the next dose. If you cannot reach your veterinarian and your pet is acting normally and is eating, skip the missed dose and give the usual dose at the next soonest regularly scheduled time.
How Much Water Should Dogs Drink. Most dogs should drink about 1 ounce of water for every pound that they weigh, every day. That means a 10-pound dog needs about two-thirds of a 16oz bottle of water daily. Really active pups or dogs who are pregnant or recently had puppies often need more water per pound of weight.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My puppy is urinating a lot. And the lady I gave one of the puppies to said she thinks her puppy has diabetes could my puppy have it to
ANSWER : A. It is not likely that either one of these puppies has diabetes. It is very uncommon for a puppy that young to have diabetes. If your puppy is straining to urinate or is urinating very small amounts frequently and cannot seem to wait for very long between urination, he may have a urinary tract infection. It is quite possible that your puppy is completely normal. I would suggest an exam with your veterinarian and discuss the behavior with them. They may suggest a urinalysis. Your puppy should be going to the vet at 3 week intervals for vaccinations at this age, so you can discuss it when he has his next set of vaccines. The other person with the other puppy should also be taking hers to a vet for proper immunizations and she should also discuss her concerns with her vet.

Q. How do I get my dog to stop chewing on things? I kennel her when I leave for a few hours, but I can’t go to the mailbox without her eating something.
ANSWER : A. If she’s young, then this is just normal puppy behavior. Don’t worry about it. The thing about puppies is, they explore using their mouths. If your puppy grabs a coat hanger, or a slipper, you should roll up a newspaper, and smack yourself on the head with it for leaving those things out.. your puppy is going to explore things, that’s normal! It is 100% up to YOU to keep those things away from your puppy when your puppy is unsupervised… even for just a moment.

Remember to never scold your puppy for grabbing these things. They are just curious little cuties, and they don’t chew things up to bother us.. Dogs do not have intentional thought, so they aren’t ever doing anything ON PURPOSE to us.. The most important thing you can do when your puppy is chewing something you don’t want her to be chewing is TRADE her the inappropriate item with a toy of hers, so she understands “no honey, that isn’t what puppies chew on… THIS is what puppies chew on!” and then begin playing with her using her toy to show her that TOYS ARE FUN.. Way more fun than a boring ol’ coat hanger.

Another helpful thing you can do is have two bags of toys. In each bag is many different kinds of toys. Lots of chew toys, lots of soft squeaky toys, lots of rope-type toys, a bunch of balls.. All kinds of things! For one week you have bag#1’s toys out for your puppy to play with.. At the end of the one week, you collect those toys, and you bring out bag#2! The toys will be more interesting/feel like new to your puppy, which will in-turn, make her chew less inappropriate things. Her toys are too fun to care about that dumb Wii-mote that you left laying around.

Hope this helps!

Q. How long should I feed puppy food to my puppy?
ANSWER : A. A puppy should be given puppy food from around the time that the mother begins weaning her pups until the puppy reaches about the age of one year. This is generally true for all dogs, unless your veterinarian has concerns about your puppy’s growth. Under those circumstances, your veterinarian will make alternate recommendations for your puppy’s diet. Otherwise, around one year, you may begin giving your puppy an adult formula dog food at meal times.

Read Full Q/A … : What should you feed a puppy?

Q. I have 2 puppies that I think may have parvo, the little one is throwing up thick bubbly puke and watery stool. Can the vaccinated mom still get sick?
ANSWER : A. If you suspect one or both of your puppies have parvo, it is best to bring them into a vet for care. Parvo is a very serious and contagious disease and it can kill puppies without proper treatment.

As Parvo IS very contagious, it is best to keep the sick puppy isolated from any other dogs in the house. While your adult dog is less likely to get ill due to vaccination, no vaccine is 100%. Your other puppies if not vaccinated are also very likely to get ill. Be sure to thoroughly clean any surfaces your sick dog comes into contact with as Parvo can live in the environment for up to several months if not properly cleaned.

If your puppy is very ill, your vet can run a fecal test to look for Parvo. Parvo symptoms usually include vomiting and diarrhea that often is blood-tinged. Parvo can cause dogs to become very dehydrated and unable to keep food, liquids or medications down and usually require hospitalization and IV fluids to provide medications and nutrition while they are ill.

Q. How do I tech my puppy to tell me when he needs to go outside to go potty?
ANSWER : A. I would suggest that you have a one on one consultation with a Petcoach consultant such as myself and I would suggest that you sign your puppy up for a puppy class. Puppy class Dog trainers help teach their students everything and anything concerning puppy care and training. They can help you with potty training, biting, chewing, toys, care, commands, ect. Also you will be able to socialize your puppy with other puppies at a young age which you NEED to do! If you have a dog that was never socialized with other dogs it will become fearful and even aggressive and bite other dogs later in life.

Q. He has a malignant tumor the size of a small grapefruit on the left side of liver what homopathyic steps can I take to help him or surgery an option
ANSWER : A. I’m assuming the tumor was diagnosed on ultrasound, and a needle aspirate was taken to diagnose the type of tumor? If that hasn’t been done it should be – lots of tumors, especially the big ones, aren’t malignant, and may not cause any big problems if left alone. So let’s start there – get a needle biopsy done if possible.

If you definitely have a diagnosis of “cancer”, and the tumor is confined to one area or “lobe” of the liver, it may absolutely be surgically resectable, which may provide a complete cure. I would discuss this option with a very capable surgeon, perhaps one who is board certified if available, and proceed if he/she thinks the whole tumor can be removed.

Unfortunately I can’t think of any natural or homeopathic treatments that could be helpful. I think first you have to know the tumor is dangerous and then consider removing it, if possible.

Read Full Q/A … : pharm nclex Flashcards

Q. What solid food should I start 4 week old Pit Bull puppies on?
ANSWER : A. A puppy food designed for large breed puppies can help with rapidly growing bones and joints and can be given in a wet form easily to puppies learning to eat solids. You can also provide a dry kibble for them to try and should moisten it with water or some formula to make it easier for the puppies to eat and digest. As the puppies grow and their teeth come in, they will begin to eat and explore more of the solid food on their own.

Mom should also be on a Puppy formula while nursing her puppies as it will provide extra nutrients to both her and babies while they are in a very rapid stage of growth!

Q. Hybrid wolf dog is losing a lot of hair around butt, we just got a new puppy and I’m worried that could be the reason…any thoughts?
ANSWER : A. He may have fleas, or mites or anal sac problems and therefore licks or scratches the are a a lot which can cause hair loss. The only way the new puppy could be the reason is if the puppy licks the other dog’s butt a lot and pulls out the hair. Better take your wolf hybrid to a veterinarian for an exam.