Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. It is never stubbornness. Dogs are not stubborn, they can’t be. Dogs do not generalize well, and dogs display fearful behavior that appears to be stubbornness. Absolutely NEVER force this dog to walk outside when he is uncomfortable with doing so.. the more you force him to do it, opposition reflex – the more he will resist. The more he resists and is forced into it, the less he learns about being comfortable, and the more he becomes fearful of you and of the situation.

What you can do is carry extremely high value treats outside with you. Things like cooked white meat chicken, cooked fish, turkey pepperoni, turkey bacon, diced ham, mozzarella cheese sticks – all cut up into tiny little pea-sized pieces. You can also use peanut butter in a squeeze tube. First, put on the leash indoors and begin feeding him the treats. Help him make positive associations with having the leash put on. Then, take the leash off, and start over in 10min. Put the leash on, feed treats, walk to the door, open the door, feed treats, close door, take off leash. Start over in 10min. Put on leash, feed treats, go to door, feed treats, open door, feed treats, go outside, feed tons of treats and praise. Keep Titus in his comfort zone. If he doesn’t want to go far, just feed him tons of treats where he IS comfortable going. Make sure everything is calm/happy/positive. I bet in a week of doing this, he will be happy with walk further and further all of the time. If ever he is uncomfortable, feed him lots of treats for being a brave boy, and then turn around and go back home. It’s all about keeping him in his comfort zone.. it’s all about remaining within his threshold and never forcing him to feed uncomfortable.

This is very common for puppies. The world is scary! It’s brand new to them, and it’s up to you to make their interactions and discoveries positive, happy, calm, and to never force them into anything.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

If the dog has not been leash trained before, the sight, smell and feel of the leash and collar could be frightening or make the dog nervous, which can lead to resistance or balking. A dog that has been cooped up may be overly excited to go out on the leash, which can lead to more pulling or ignoring commands.
Start with short, slow walks.

Encourage your pup to go a short distance (even a few houses down the block), then return. Don`t push the pace — let your pup amble as slowly as they like. Many puppies` walking skills improve with short, positive experiences; walks that are too long or too fast can overwhelm them.

A few of the most common reasons dogs are afraid of the great outdoors include puppy panic, overstimulation, unfamiliarity with leashes and collars, and prior negative experiences. It is important that you learn to be a good advocate for your canine, and help her overcome a fear of the outdoors.
Don`t force him to walk in areas that make him nervous. If smells and sounds from the zoo make him nervous, stay away from the zoo. Walk where he`s comfortable; go in a new direction or drive to a new area a mile or two away. Use treats and praise to encourage him, and never use force or drag your dog along.
Choose a route that avoids their triggers as much as possible, then walk the same route every time. Keep walks brief at first. Until your dog feels more comfortable, don`t overstress him. Treats are a great distraction, so buy some small treats for positive reinforcement.
If your puppy doesn`t want to go for a walk, there can be several reasons. Either he is lazy, afraid or the weather is too hot or too cold for him. He could also be sick or ailing.
As you walk, watch your dog carefully and as soon as they notice a person, calmly acknowledge that they have seen them with a marker word such as `yes` or `good,` and then reward them with a treat. Ideally as you give the reward you want to keep encouraging them and also move your dog away from the stranger.
Insufficient socialization: Dogs who miss out on the critical socialization period during puppyhood might end up afraid to take walks. In order to view the world as a welcoming place, puppies need to be gently exposed to novel situations, places and beings in short, positive sessions before they hit 14 weeks old.
Lots of dogs refuse to walk or keep moving if they are scared of something in their surroundings. This is seen most often in young puppies who are going through their fear period and adult dogs that are walking in an unfamiliar environment (especially if they tend to be anxious/fearful or have a history of trauma).
You are not a bad pet owner if you miss walking your dog a day or two, says Smiling Leash. So long as your pup is getting some kind of activity, they are doing just fine, says Vet Street. While walking may be the preferred method of exercise for some pet owners, others do not have the time.
Again, you may need to build this up slowly, but taking your dog out on regular walks will help them both physically and mentally. The experts say: “When they aren`t properly stimulated and can`t expend all of their natural energy, a dog`s boredom levels can turn into sadness.
Practice having them walk next to you on a loose leash. Then have them sit multiple times on a walk just because you asked them too. You can also change your walking speed or normal route. All of these things will help your dog learn that you are in control on a walk.
Older puppies will require more exercise. A six-month-old dog might be capable of taking longer walks or even short jogs (if your vet helps you determine he`s in good overall health and up for it), for example, but long hikes over rough terrain or strenuous agility classes are still potentially dangerous.
How far can I walk my puppy? The so-called “5-minute rule” says that the puppy should increase with 5 minutes of walking every month. For a six months old puppy, that means about 30 minutes of exercise.
While dogs can and do experience social learning throughout their lifetimes, puppies are maximally primed for socialization between the ages of 3-14 weeks of age. This period is called the “sensitive period for socialization”.
Puppies who are simply learning to be alone usually calm down after a short period—within five to ten minutes. Think of it as taking a few minutes to “settle in”— vocalizing or pacing before relaxing with a toy or falling asleep.
They may even approach the stranger, but still display insecure body language (head lowered, tail tucked, hackles raised, etc.). An insecure dog may be very clingy to you, following you around the house as you go from room to room. You may not see them relax until you relax, such as when you sit on the couch.
Many young dogs go through a stage of shyness during their adolescence, typically when they are four to five months old. Most of these fear-related behaviours fade as the dog matures, gains confidence, and becomes used to the triggering situation.
Undesirable behaviours such as barking, chewing, counter surfing, house-soiling and jumping up commonly begin to occur at around 3-6 months of age. Your puppy will not grow out of these behaviours. On the contrary, it is more likely that these behaviours will worsen if not addressed early on.
It`s a misconception that dogs can only enjoy off lead exercise – plenty of dogs need to be kept on lead for health or behaviour reasons and they still get the exercise and mental stimulation they crave.
Niki is launching her first Don`t Walk Your Dog Day on Saturday, April 2, to raise awareness that “not all dogs thrive on daily walks“. “Contrary to popular belief, dogs with behaviour struggles can get more reactive or more excitable when we try to exhaust them through too much exercise,” she said.
Adult dogs age one year and up: up to eight hours, but ideally no more than six. Senior dogs age eight and up: depending on size and health, anywhere from two to six hours.
Walking: Walking should be part of every dog`s daily routine to keep them physically and mentally healthy. Most dogs need at least 1-2 walks per day (unless otherwise specified by your vet).

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My puppy refuses to walk outside on the leash. This only happens when we’re outside… Is it stubbornness or fear?
ANSWER : A. It is never stubbornness. Dogs are not stubborn, they can’t be. Dogs do not generalize well, and dogs display fearful behavior that appears to be stubbornness. Absolutely NEVER force this dog to walk outside when he is uncomfortable with doing so.. the more you force him to do it, opposition reflex – the more he will resist. The more he resists and is forced into it, the less he learns about being comfortable, and the more he becomes fearful of you and of the situation.

What you can do is carry extremely high value treats outside with you. Things like cooked white meat chicken, cooked fish, turkey pepperoni, turkey bacon, diced ham, mozzarella cheese sticks – all cut up into tiny little pea-sized pieces. You can also use peanut butter in a squeeze tube. First, put on the leash indoors and begin feeding him the treats. Help him make positive associations with having the leash put on. Then, take the leash off, and start over in 10min. Put the leash on, feed treats, walk to the door, open the door, feed treats, close door, take off leash. Start over in 10min. Put on leash, feed treats, go to door, feed treats, open door, feed treats, go outside, feed tons of treats and praise. Keep Titus in his comfort zone. If he doesn’t want to go far, just feed him tons of treats where he IS comfortable going. Make sure everything is calm/happy/positive. I bet in a week of doing this, he will be happy with walk further and further all of the time. If ever he is uncomfortable, feed him lots of treats for being a brave boy, and then turn around and go back home. It’s all about keeping him in his comfort zone.. it’s all about remaining within his threshold and never forcing him to feed uncomfortable.

This is very common for puppies. The world is scary! It’s brand new to them, and it’s up to you to make their interactions and discoveries positive, happy, calm, and to never force them into anything.

Q. What’s the best way to train a dog to use a lead again?
ANSWER : A. It depends on how serious your issue is. If you need to start from scratch: Bring out the leash, place it on the ground. Click and treat your dog. Say his name, work on attention, click and treat for attention. Work with the cheese sticks, or with some chicken.. something stinky, soft, and high value. Allow him to sniff the leash, praise him, click, treat, click, treat. Pick up the leash, click treat him. Hook the leash to his collar and allow the leash to drag, click treat him. Have him just follow you around, click and treat him to hold his attention.

Then, pick up the leash, click and treat him. Then drop the leash again, click and treat. Take baby steps. Then, hold the leash while you take a step, click and treat him for following. Open the front door, click and treat him. Then, take off the leash, click and treat him, and end training.

Pick training back up in an hour, and do the same exact thing from start to finish, only this time, “finish” will be you two going outside, you clicking and treating him a bunch, and then you bringing him back inside. Work your way up slowly. You can’t expect to just bring him outside and bring him on a walk right away.

When outdoors, use a front hooking harness like the Sensible/Sensation harnesses: http://www.softouchconcepts.com/index.php/product-53/sense-ible-harness / http://www.softouchconcepts.com/index.php/product-53/sense-ation-harness. These harnesses will eliminate the pulling power of your pup in a positive way. This will put you in control without the use of force. Carry high value treats with you everywhere, and offer them for good walking behavior – treats like white meat chicken, cooked fish, turkey pepperoni, turkey bacon, diced ham, mozzarella cheese sticks, hotdogs, all cut into tiny little pieces. The more you work on walking on-leash/attention indoors, the better it will be outdoors, remember that.

Q. How do I get my dog to stop chewing on things? I kennel her when I leave for a few hours, but I can’t go to the mailbox without her eating something.
ANSWER : A. If she’s young, then this is just normal puppy behavior. Don’t worry about it. The thing about puppies is, they explore using their mouths. If your puppy grabs a coat hanger, or a slipper, you should roll up a newspaper, and smack yourself on the head with it for leaving those things out.. your puppy is going to explore things, that’s normal! It is 100% up to YOU to keep those things away from your puppy when your puppy is unsupervised… even for just a moment.

Remember to never scold your puppy for grabbing these things. They are just curious little cuties, and they don’t chew things up to bother us.. Dogs do not have intentional thought, so they aren’t ever doing anything ON PURPOSE to us.. The most important thing you can do when your puppy is chewing something you don’t want her to be chewing is TRADE her the inappropriate item with a toy of hers, so she understands “no honey, that isn’t what puppies chew on… THIS is what puppies chew on!” and then begin playing with her using her toy to show her that TOYS ARE FUN.. Way more fun than a boring ol’ coat hanger.

Another helpful thing you can do is have two bags of toys. In each bag is many different kinds of toys. Lots of chew toys, lots of soft squeaky toys, lots of rope-type toys, a bunch of balls.. All kinds of things! For one week you have bag#1’s toys out for your puppy to play with.. At the end of the one week, you collect those toys, and you bring out bag#2! The toys will be more interesting/feel like new to your puppy, which will in-turn, make her chew less inappropriate things. Her toys are too fun to care about that dumb Wii-mote that you left laying around.

Hope this helps!

Q. My dog is house trained but has started pooping in the house, why is she doing that?
ANSWER : A. It could be the type of food you are feeding. If you are feeding a lower quality kibble, it will be packed with fillers. These fillers will cause your dog to poop more than is necessary, and it can cause your dog to poop indoors because of the excess poop. Finding a higher quality kibble like Taste of the Wild, Orijen, or a high quality food like Ziwipeak, or Honest Kitchen, will help with that issue.

Remember to NEVER scold for accident indoors. The more you scold, the more fearful your dog is of pooping in front of you, the less your dog will want to poop in front of you outdoors, the more he will poop indoors, the more you scold… it’s a vicious cycle.

Have you been cleaning messes with Nature Miracle? Pick up a bottle, and try cleaning with that instead of regular cleaner. It will eliminate the smells deep down (even to your dog), which will discourage him from potting in that spot again.

Maybe he needs to be taken outside more often, and maybe he needs to be kept outside longer each time. He should be allowed at least 10 minutes of roaming outside before he has to come back inside. Allow him 10 minutes every single time you bring him outside, just in case he has to poop. He needs every opportunity you can give him. Bring him outside every hour if he’s full grown, every 40 minutes if he’s an adolescent (6-10 months), and every 30 minutes if he’s a puppy (2-6 months). If you have a doggy door, you should still be bringing your dog outside yourself to encourage him to stay outside longer, and poop. When he does poop outside, you should praise him, and reward him with lots of treats!

Q. My 1 year old great Pyrenees will not walk on the leash she stops and jumps around on the leash and when I try to walk her she just sits down.
ANSWER : A. At one year, she is right in the middle of canine adolescence which is when new fears can show up. She needs positive reinforcement and luring to teach her leash walking is a good thing. You can take some special, tasty treats that she doesn’t get regularly for leash walking time only. Use these treats to lure her forward a little bit at a time. Don’t pull or force her or it will become a big, negative experience to only reinforce her discomfort. Keep it light, positive, and fun. You will likely only get a short distance the first few days, but within a few weeks you should be able to increase that and help her overcome her fear about it.

Q. My puppy is urinating a lot. And the lady I gave one of the puppies to said she thinks her puppy has diabetes could my puppy have it to
ANSWER : A. It is not likely that either one of these puppies has diabetes. It is very uncommon for a puppy that young to have diabetes. If your puppy is straining to urinate or is urinating very small amounts frequently and cannot seem to wait for very long between urination, he may have a urinary tract infection. It is quite possible that your puppy is completely normal. I would suggest an exam with your veterinarian and discuss the behavior with them. They may suggest a urinalysis. Your puppy should be going to the vet at 3 week intervals for vaccinations at this age, so you can discuss it when he has his next set of vaccines. The other person with the other puppy should also be taking hers to a vet for proper immunizations and she should also discuss her concerns with her vet.

Q. How do I tech my puppy to tell me when he needs to go outside to go potty?
ANSWER : A. I would suggest that you have a one on one consultation with a Petcoach consultant such as myself and I would suggest that you sign your puppy up for a puppy class. Puppy class Dog trainers help teach their students everything and anything concerning puppy care and training. They can help you with potty training, biting, chewing, toys, care, commands, ect. Also you will be able to socialize your puppy with other puppies at a young age which you NEED to do! If you have a dog that was never socialized with other dogs it will become fearful and even aggressive and bite other dogs later in life.

Q. How do I teach my dog to sit still enough and not move his head while I clip on the gentle leader?
ANSWER : A. Most dogs HATE the gentle leader, and it’s not at all surprising. Would you want something foreign on your face? It’s an uncomfortable training tool, and no dog enjoys wearing it. If you are looking to have your dog behave better on-leash, you should consider tossing out that gentle leader, and using a front hooking harness like the Sensible http://www.softouchconcepts.com/index.php/product-53/sense-ible-harness, or the Sensation http://www.softouchconcepts.com/index.php/product-53/sense-ation-harness harness. These harnesses will eliminate the pulling power of your dog, and put you in control in a positive, and gentle way. Any time your dog pulls, he is redirected until he is facing you. You can practically walk your dog with your pinky.

I dislike the gentle leader because it can cause neck injuries in an avid puller/lunger. You also can’t ever hook a long-lead to the gentle leader and allow your dog to run around because it would break his neck. Another thing I dislike about it, is it discourages sniffing the ground during walks. When your dog attempts to sniff, and the leash is short, his nose is redirected upwards. When you trip on the leash, the head is jerked around and the nose is directed upwards. Sniffing during walks is extremely important. Sniffing = mental stimulation, which will tire your dog out more during your walks. The more your dog lags, or forges, the less he can sniff the ground, and the more frustrated he becomes.

If you’re dead set on using the head halti.. you should be using treats to hold his attention. Place the head halti on the floor, reward him for sniffing it, pick it up, treat him, put it near his face, treat him, lure his nose through the loop, lots of treats, take the head halti off, more treats, lure his nose through again, more treats. Take baby steps going forwards AND backwards so the “game” of getting the halti on isn’t always getting more difficult.