Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. It is possible illness or even nutritional imbalance from caring for a litter has caused your rabbit to become ill. If she is laying on her side and not moving, it is best to bring her to your veterinarian or an ER clinic immediately. They will likely recommend tests in addition to an exam such as X-rays or blood work to check for serious injury or illness that could be causing her sudden onset of symptoms. You will likely need to nurse the baby bunnies if they are not weaned with supplemental KMR until the mother is back to health and this can be purchased at most vet clinics or local pet supply stories.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

In most cases, a rabbit laying on their side is just sleeping. They aren`t sick or dying in any way. Instead, this is a position rabbits will sleep in when they feel completely safe and secure in their environment. This is what`s called a rabbit flop.
This may be normal behavior. Sick or injured rabbits may be identified by abnormal behaviors such as lying on their sides for extended periods of time, head tilting, falling over, or inability to run in a straight line.
During the day, rabbits like to sleep in their burrow, in depressions of grass or in their cages. Sometimes you may see your rabbit sleeping in her litter box. This is perfectly normal, and you can make it more comfortable by using a good, soft paper-type litter such as Carefresh.
It`s extremely important to contact your vet straight away if you notice your rabbit is eating less than normal. There are many different problems that could have caused your rabbit to stop eating, but some of the most common include dental disease, stress, and gut problems.
When a rabbit isn`t eating, it`s usually because they are very ill or stressed. Conditions such as GI stasis, dental disease, or chronic anxiety are likely culprits. If your rabbit ever stops eating for more than 10 hours at a time, they should be brought to a veterinarian for emergency care.
Spondylosis, osteoarthritis, vertebral disc deterioration, and other degenerative processes can cause hind limb weakness and paralysis in rabbits. If these are suspected, your vet may wish to get a positive diagnosis via radiography. The exact treatment will depend on the cause of the problem.
Rabbit is limp, floppy or cold

These rabbits are very, very sick and may be close to death. The common end point of dehydration, shock or sepsis is a weak floppy rabbit, often with cold ears. They tend to sit hunched in a corner and `feel funny` when you pick them up.

While you seek treatment, try to keep your rabbit hydrated and warm. A syringe with water or soft foods (applesauce or baby food) can assist. Depending on the condition, your vet may prescribe prescription medication to help your rabbit`s condition.
ANXIOUS BUNNY

If your rabbits are worried, they may flatten themselves on the ground in a position that`s either ready to take flight or to take cover. This is a sign that they`re feeling uncomfortable and don`t want someone near to them.

If the hutch is too small or lacks entertainment, they`ll be reluctant to return. Ensure that your rabbit feels safe from predators. Also, make sure they`ve had enough exercise and human company during the day. It`s vital to get your rabbit into the habit of sleeping in their hutch.
It is important that you understand all the requirements for caring for a rabbit before you buy one. Rabbits generally live for 5 to 8 years depending on their environment and breed, but they can live for as long as 12 years. If you decide to purchase a rabbit, make sure you are prepared to care for them that long.
The belly of constipated rabbits is usually inflamed and lacks the characteristic sound of peristaltic bowel movements. In addition, the rabbit is likely to be lethargic, without energy or lying in its cage. You may also grind your aching teeth.
The domestic rabbit, also known as the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), are prone to a multitude of infections that may cause them to die suddenly. Pathogens that may cause mortality in rabbits include those which are bacterial, viral, and protozoan.
Stasis. Any longtime rabbit guardian has likely dealt with stasis. It`s one of the most common maladies that affects rabbits. Symptoms vary, but rabbits who suffer from stasis usually are lethargic or are unable to get comfortable because of gas or cramping.
Bunnies are “daytime” sleepers, sleeping for about six to eight hours each day. Much like deer, bunnies are crepuscular, which means they are most active during dusk and dawn.
Signs that a rabbit is near death include refusing to eat, an unusual level of lethargy, difficulty breathing, or a sudden change in vital signs. A rabbit should have a body temperature between 100 degrees Fahrenheit and 104 degrees Fahrenheit, as well as a heart rate between 180 and 250 beats per minute.
Often a rabbit in pain will sit hunched up, unwilling to move. A rabbit that sits hunched up, with eyes half closed, and firm teeth grinding is likely in pain and needs a vet check form filled out and supervisor notified.
When rabbits get sick, they may be in so much discomfort or pain that they refuse to eat. This can be lethal to rabbits because their health relies on the constant movement of their digestion. To help a sick rabbit recover from their illness, you may have to force feed them Critical Care with a syringe.
You may worry that your rabbit will be lonely. If you spend a lot of time with your rabbit, they will undoubtedly miss you when you`re away, the same way you miss them. The two of you have developed a bond and friendship that your pet rabbit also understands.
One guideline to go by is at least 8 square feet of enclosure space combined with at least at least 24 square feet of exercise space, for 1-2 rabbits, in which the rabbit(s) can run and play at least 5 hours per day.
How often should you clean out your rabbit`s litter box? Your bunny`s litter box will need to be cleaned every 1-7 days.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My rabbit is just laying on her side not getting up was fine last night and she recently had a litter
ANSWER : A. It is possible illness or even nutritional imbalance from caring for a litter has caused your rabbit to become ill. If she is laying on her side and not moving, it is best to bring her to your veterinarian or an ER clinic immediately. They will likely recommend tests in addition to an exam such as X-rays or blood work to check for serious injury or illness that could be causing her sudden onset of symptoms. You will likely need to nurse the baby bunnies if they are not weaned with supplemental KMR until the mother is back to health and this can be purchased at most vet clinics or local pet supply stories.

Read Full Q/A … : Is My Bunny Sick?

Q. My cat seems to have lost control of her bowels and no longer uses her litter box even to urinate. She is 5 or 6 yrs and is in good health otherwise
ANSWER : A. If your cat has had a sudden change in litter box habits, it is always a good idea to rule out any underlying issues with a wellness check from your vet. Bringing in a urine and stool sample if possible can also help as tests can be run on these samples to check for common infections or parasites. If these are present, treating them usually helps resolve the problem of not using the box.

Loss of bowel control usually results in dribbling of feces or urine rather than complete accidents. If you are seeing this, it is possible that an injury to the hind end or problem with the nerves or muscles is happening and should be looked at by your vet.

If the accidents are complete (full amount of stool, big puddle of urine) your cat may be choosing not to use the litter box due to illness, a too-dirty litter, litter pans that are too tall (which may make older cats have a harder time getting in and out), or a litter substrate that was changed too suddenly. Sometimes, changing the environment your cat’s litter box is in by lowering the sides, moving food and water dishes away and returning back to a previously liked litter can help.

In any area of an accident, an enzymatic cleaner should be used. These break down urine and stool particles, making it so that your cat is less likely to be attracted to going there again. Moving stools to the litter box can also entice your cat to start going there again.

Q. My cat is pooping outside of the litter bix. He is 2 1/2. He did this as a kitten. It stopped then started about 3 months ago. Litterbox is clean.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination or house soiling can be a frustrating problem but with a bit of detective work on your part, there is hope. First, before deciding that this is a behavioral issue, any medical problems (diarrhea, constipation, fecal incontinence, pain on defecation, etc.) need to be ruled out and/or treated. If your cat receives a clean bill of health from your vet but is still eliminating outside the litterbox, then we need to consider that something about the box itself might be aversive to your cat. Cats can be quite finicky about their litterbox and toileting habits. Below I have listed common recommendations and cat preferences for litterbox use. Review the list and make any changes that could account for your cat’s aversion to defecating in the litterbox:
* Soft, fine-grained clumping litter (vs, coarse-grained, non-clumping litter)
* Unscented
* 1 – 1 1/2 inch depth (especially older cats or cats with hip problems)
* Larger pans (especially for large cats) – want to get whole body inside – poop just outside the box might mean the box is too small
* Open, non-hooded
* At least one shallow side to get in and out easily
* Easy to get to – not hidden away, preferably in areas they spend time in or near – and not near appliances that make scary, unpredictable noises (washers, dryers, refrigerators)
* Scoop minimum 1X/day – preferably 2
* Clean the litterbox with soap and water and put in fresh scoopable litter at least once/month (instead of just continuously adding)
* Some cats prefer to urinate in one box and defecate in a separate box, so you may need 2 boxes even if you just have 1 cat. Multi-cat households should have 1 box/cat plus 1 extra.

Q. What can a human get from a rabbit? What illness can a human get from a domesticated rabbit?
ANSWER : A. Actual diseases passed from rabbit to human is rare. the most common issues are allergies to rabbits and infection from a bite or scratch.
Wild rabbits may pass on salmonella but this is rare and even rarer in domestic rabbits. The only other thing is mites. some rabbits suffer from cheyletiella which can be transmitted to humans.

Q. Our cat of six years has on two separate occasions has defecated on the living room rug and recently pee’d on the skirt of the Christmas tree.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his eliminating outside the box.

If medical issues are ruled out, take a look at other reasons. Has there been a lot of unusual activity? Has you cat been left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Is it big enough? Have you changed the type or brand of litter? Is there something attractive about the spot he uses? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out to express their dissatisfaction.

The general rule is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped daily, if not more often and changed completely weekly, washed with soap and water only. You can offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystals, it makes a hissing sound when wet that startles some cats and make them reluctant to use it again. The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure any other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litter box. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation. And, when cleaning up pet accidents, don’t use any cleaner containing ammonia. This leaves behind a scent similar to urine.

Q. I have a cat that defecates in the litter box but always urinates outside the box. It is very annoying.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his eliminating outside the box.

If medical issues are ruled out, take a look at other reasons. Has there been a lot of unusual activity? Has you cat been left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Is it big enough? Have you changed the type or brand of litter? Is there something attractive about the spot he uses? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out to express their dissatisfaction.

The general rule is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped daily, if not more often and changed completely weekly, washed with soap and water only. You can offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystals, it makes a hissing sound when wet that startles some cats and make them reluctant to use it again. The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure any other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litter box. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation. And, when cleaning up pet accidents, don’t use any cleaner containing ammonia. This leaves behind a scent similar to urine.

Q. We have 2 cats and got 2 rabbits yesterday. 1 rabbit died with probably E.Cuniculi. How at risk are our cats? What can we do?
ANSWER : A. This parasite is dangerous only for rabbits. Your cats are safe but the other rabbit can get the parasite. Disease is spreaded by urine and hay or litter contaminated with urine. Keep the rabbit in separate new cage with new litter. If you will notice any sign of infestation ( opthalmological or neurological) see a vet as soon as possible

Q. My cat will not stop going to the toilet on my carpet, bed, washing pile etc.. Also uses its litter box occasionally? I don’t understand why this is?
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his eliminating outside the box.
If medical issues are ruled out, take a look at other reasons. Has there been a lot of unusual activity? Has you cat been left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Is it big enough? Have you changed the type or brand of litter? Is there something attractive about the spot he uses? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out to express their dissatisfaction.
The general rule is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped daily, if not more often and changed completely weekly, washed with soap and water only. You can offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystals, it makes a hissing sound when wet that startles some cats and make them reluctant to use it again. The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure any other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litter box. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation. And, when cleaning up pet accidents, don’t use any cleaner containing ammonia. This leaves behind a scent similar to urine.