I help her

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. It is normal when you bring a new pet into the house. She will get used to the puppy given time just remember to pamper her as much if not more than the puppy. You may want to have her checked over just to make sure there isn’t any medical problem or pain causing it. Schnauzers are stubborn dogs!

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Causes of Dog Depression

Beaver said major changes in a dog`s life could lead to periods of depression. Those include moving into a new home, a new spouse or baby in the household, or adding another pet. Even a change in the dog`s schedule, for instance a stay-at-home owner who takes a job, can cause a dog to get down.

Bringing home a new puppy or another adult dog can trigger jealousy in your dog, and they may show signs of aggression toward the new addition. Your dog might growl at the new dog, guard your lap, or try to get in between you and your new furry family member.
Introducing a new pet may leave your dog feeling jealous. The best way to avoid jealousy in your pet is to make sure that you`re giving it enough love, exercise, attention and interaction, even if you have another pet at home.
Feed them at a certain time, take them out for a daily walk, and have cuddle sessions in between; all this can help cheer your pup up. If in the case your dog is still sad or does not seem to be getting better, they might need some medical attention.
Your dog is used to being your companion, and if there are other dogs that are taking you away, they are going to act upset, jealous, and even angry. This new puppy is also on their territory, and they may feel like their life is in jeopardy. This behavior is perfectly normal.
It can take up to one month for an old dog and new dog to really settle in and accept each other`s position in the pack. If you want a second dog, you need to be ready to commit to this process and not panic.
By nature, dogs are social and thrive in group environments. Therefore, there are many advantages to adopting a second dog, such as: They can keep each other company. Both dogs will be able to entertain each other and get exercise together.
‌To stop your dog`s jealous behavior early, you can try the following tips: Record examples that cause jealousy or aggression in your dog. Avoid giving too much attention to one pet over another. Train your dog to feel safe and relaxed in their crate.
People leave the dogs home rather than try to bring 2 dogs to other homes or businesses. Or, if they do bring both, it still means that the 2nd dog doesn`t get to learn how to act on their own. So, her socialization process is stunted and she doesn`t grow into being a confident, happy dog.
Your old dog and new puppy might roughhouse, nip at each other, or wrestle a bit when they are getting to know each other. This is normal and expected socializing behavior. It`s how doggies say, “Hi, who are you?” If your older dog and new puppy seem excited or agitated around each other for a week or so, don`t worry.
If your older pup appears to be apathetic and generally has a lack of energy, this could signal depression. Let`s say Fido used to love to play ball and now doesn`t even blink an eye or wag his tail when you try to engage. Jealousy and sadness about the new puppy could be the culprit.
Not every dog likes puppies. Some dogs don`t tolerate puppies at all, and may have over-the-top reactions that could harm the puppy. It`s important to keep a watchful eye on the interactions, and intervene when body language and communication escalate to an unsafe level.
Your dog may want to go away from the puppy or may growl or even snap to tell the puppy to go away. However, if your older dog uses his teeth on the new puppy, that is not normal, and it may be time to consult with a veterinary behaviorist.
What is the 3-3-3 rule when adopting a dog? The 3-3-3 rule represents the phases of a rescue dog or common milestones your new dog or puppy will go through. The 3-3-3 rule is the first 3 days, 3 weeks, and 3 months after bringing your dog home from the shelter.
Whether you rescue an older dog or a puppy, a lot of dogs tend to follow the 3-3-3 rule when getting acclimated: 3 days of feeling overwhelmed and nervous. 3 weeks of settling in. 3 months of building trust and bonding with you.
They enjoy friendly interactions with familiar humans or other animals and tend to avoid isolation. That being said, every dog is different has its own temperament and preferences. Some dogs prefer to live alone with their owners, while others prefer having another dog friend in the house.
Before settling on a breed, think about the gender of the dog. For the happiest dogs and the safest household, opposite sex dogs almost always do best together. Many same-sex combinations of dogs will fight, sometimes to the death. Those who work out a dominance order may not fare much better.
Beyond finances, the biggest challenge for many people owning multiple dogs is having enough time for them. While many dogs enjoy engaging and playing with other pups in the home, that doesn`t diminish the amount of time each dog needs and deserves from you.
And the fact that you`re concerned about the impact a second dog will have on your current dog is a good thing; it means you`re thinking about your dog`s emotional well-being. Still, the sooner you ditch the guilty feelings, the better.
Dogs lick you for a number of reasons, including showing affection or demonstrating empathy. If your dog licks you when you get home, it could be their way of welcoming you back. Your dog may also lick you in order to get your attention or let you know that they`re anxious.
Dogs have several reasons for staring at their owners, like to communicate with and understand us. Some dogs stare to manipulate owners, as in with begging for food or asking to be let outside. Training and dog sports are good ways to turn focused staring behavior into a positive experience.
The phrase “Puppy Blues” refers to feelings of anxiety, depression, or both related to acquiring a dog under the age of one. Symptom severity may change daily, but overall, these feelings interfere with your ability to function daily. Nearly 70% of puppy owners reported symptoms of anxiety, depression, or both.
And “because dogs are highly social creatures,” Dr. Borns-Weil says, in most cases, “getting another dog is the right thing to do. Dogs in isolation are not happy.” Even if you are home with your dog much of the day, a second dog in the family might very well be the right choice.
Yes, your dog knows how much you love him! Dogs and humans have a very special relationship, where dogs have actually hijacked the human oxytocin bonding pathway that is normally reserved for our babies. When you stare at your dog, both your oxytocin levels go up, the same as when you pet them and play with them.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My schnauzer is usually happy and go lucky since we got a new puppy her mood is changed. She is stubborn and moody. Is this normal? How can I help her
ANSWER : A. It is normal when you bring a new pet into the house. She will get used to the puppy given time just remember to pamper her as much if not more than the puppy. You may want to have her checked over just to make sure there isn’t any medical problem or pain causing it. Schnauzers are stubborn dogs!

Read Full Q/A … : Dog Aggression

Q. How do I get my dog to stop chewing on things? I kennel her when I leave for a few hours, but I can’t go to the mailbox without her eating something.
ANSWER : A. If she’s young, then this is just normal puppy behavior. Don’t worry about it. The thing about puppies is, they explore using their mouths. If your puppy grabs a coat hanger, or a slipper, you should roll up a newspaper, and smack yourself on the head with it for leaving those things out.. your puppy is going to explore things, that’s normal! It is 100% up to YOU to keep those things away from your puppy when your puppy is unsupervised… even for just a moment.

Remember to never scold your puppy for grabbing these things. They are just curious little cuties, and they don’t chew things up to bother us.. Dogs do not have intentional thought, so they aren’t ever doing anything ON PURPOSE to us.. The most important thing you can do when your puppy is chewing something you don’t want her to be chewing is TRADE her the inappropriate item with a toy of hers, so she understands “no honey, that isn’t what puppies chew on… THIS is what puppies chew on!” and then begin playing with her using her toy to show her that TOYS ARE FUN.. Way more fun than a boring ol’ coat hanger.

Another helpful thing you can do is have two bags of toys. In each bag is many different kinds of toys. Lots of chew toys, lots of soft squeaky toys, lots of rope-type toys, a bunch of balls.. All kinds of things! For one week you have bag#1’s toys out for your puppy to play with.. At the end of the one week, you collect those toys, and you bring out bag#2! The toys will be more interesting/feel like new to your puppy, which will in-turn, make her chew less inappropriate things. Her toys are too fun to care about that dumb Wii-mote that you left laying around.

Hope this helps!

Q. My puppy refuses to walk outside on the leash. This only happens when we’re outside… Is it stubbornness or fear?
ANSWER : A. It is never stubbornness. Dogs are not stubborn, they can’t be. Dogs do not generalize well, and dogs display fearful behavior that appears to be stubbornness. Absolutely NEVER force this dog to walk outside when he is uncomfortable with doing so.. the more you force him to do it, opposition reflex – the more he will resist. The more he resists and is forced into it, the less he learns about being comfortable, and the more he becomes fearful of you and of the situation.

What you can do is carry extremely high value treats outside with you. Things like cooked white meat chicken, cooked fish, turkey pepperoni, turkey bacon, diced ham, mozzarella cheese sticks – all cut up into tiny little pea-sized pieces. You can also use peanut butter in a squeeze tube. First, put on the leash indoors and begin feeding him the treats. Help him make positive associations with having the leash put on. Then, take the leash off, and start over in 10min. Put the leash on, feed treats, walk to the door, open the door, feed treats, close door, take off leash. Start over in 10min. Put on leash, feed treats, go to door, feed treats, open door, feed treats, go outside, feed tons of treats and praise. Keep Titus in his comfort zone. If he doesn’t want to go far, just feed him tons of treats where he IS comfortable going. Make sure everything is calm/happy/positive. I bet in a week of doing this, he will be happy with walk further and further all of the time. If ever he is uncomfortable, feed him lots of treats for being a brave boy, and then turn around and go back home. It’s all about keeping him in his comfort zone.. it’s all about remaining within his threshold and never forcing him to feed uncomfortable.

This is very common for puppies. The world is scary! It’s brand new to them, and it’s up to you to make their interactions and discoveries positive, happy, calm, and to never force them into anything.

Q. My cat will not eat the renal food my veterinarian recommended, can I feed a grocery store food?
ANSWER : A. Your veterinarian recommended a therapeutic kidney diet because it has ingredients that will help slow the progression of your cat’s conditions, especially phosphorus and lower protein levels. Many of the non-prescription or grocery store foods generally have high levels of phosphorus and would not be ideal for your cat.

To help your cat accept the new food It is important to do a transition. There are two reasons to do a transition:

1) Occasionally a pet will have a GI upset when switched to a new diet,

2) A pet will accept a new food better when a transition is done to allow the pet to get use to the new texture and flavor.

There is more of a chance with a hydrolyzed protein or different (high or low) fiber level food to cause a GI upset. Transition recommendation:

1) Recommend ¾ old diet – ¼ new diet

2) Do this for a few days; if no GI upset, go to the next step

3) ½ old diet – ½ new diet

4) Do this for a few days; if no GI upset, go to the next step

5) ¼ old diet – ¾ new diet

6) Do this for a few days; if no GI upset, go to the next step

7) End with 100% of the new food.

Sometimes a transition should be longer, especially for cats. Use the same recommendation, but instead of a few days, recommend doing each step for a week or more. If you cat is still not interested in the new diet you can research other non-prescription diets focusing on the labels for appropriate levels of phosphorus and protein.

Also, home cooking may be an option but make sure to provide adequate nutrients. A good website to consult is balanceit.com. This website helps you to create well balanced home cooked recipes and offers supplements to add into the diet.

Q. My 9 week old puppy uses the bathroom outside and then goes again as soon as I bring him into the house. Is this normal?
ANSWER : A. Puppies are good at getting distracted and forgetting to empty themselves completely. Try taking him to a low distraction area and stand still, he may stop and go a few times before getting completely empty.

Also feeding on a schedule will help you know when he has to go. Keeping a chart that tracks when he goes can help you get him out on time and see your progress.

If you keep a chart and it seems like he’s going excessively (pups go a lot, but there’s normal puppy a lot, and way to much) the chart can also help you and your vet determine if there may be a medical issue going on. An underlying medical issue such as a UTI will impede even the best housetraining efforts.

Q. My puppy is urinating a lot. And the lady I gave one of the puppies to said she thinks her puppy has diabetes could my puppy have it to
ANSWER : A. It is not likely that either one of these puppies has diabetes. It is very uncommon for a puppy that young to have diabetes. If your puppy is straining to urinate or is urinating very small amounts frequently and cannot seem to wait for very long between urination, he may have a urinary tract infection. It is quite possible that your puppy is completely normal. I would suggest an exam with your veterinarian and discuss the behavior with them. They may suggest a urinalysis. Your puppy should be going to the vet at 3 week intervals for vaccinations at this age, so you can discuss it when he has his next set of vaccines. The other person with the other puppy should also be taking hers to a vet for proper immunizations and she should also discuss her concerns with her vet.

Q. When brining home our new puppy, I’ve been told that rubbing a blanket on the other litter mates and using it as a comfort helps reduce stress. True?
ANSWER : A. Having familiar objects can certainly help your new puppy to adjust to his new surroundings. Familiar scents such as a blanket with the scent of litter mates as well as a warm water bottle wrapped in a towel or a ticking clock wrapped in a warm towel can all help. These mimic the smell and sound of litter mates, which can help a scared puppy feel a little more comfortable. As he gets more used to you, these objects will be less needed. Also, congrats on your new puppy!

Q. My dog isnt eating his biscuits and is shaking a little. He wants to cuddle a lot. I think somethings wrong with his stomach. Constipated often.. 🙁
ANSWER : A. Sounds like your dog has some gastrointestinal distress going on. Frequent constipation is kind of an unusual thing to see in dogs, but certainly if that’s going on it can cause discomfort and nausea. Adding fiber to his diet may help in the long run, however it’s probably not going to help right now, since he’s not eating. I would recommend taking him in to see your vet ASAP, as these are kind of general signs you’re describing and many things could be going on. He needs a good exam by your vet and possibly some lab work and/or x-rays to help figure out what’s going on and how to help him. If he’s got a blockage from chronic constipation your vet can give him an enema for relief.