breath?

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. If hi doesn’t have bad teeth or/and gingivitis he may have problem with excessive acid production in the stomach or other gastrointestinal problems.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Dental disease is the most common cause of unpleasant cat odors. Plaque and tartar accumulating on the teeth, gums becoming inflamed and separating from their underlying structures, and loose teeth all provide the perfect environment for bad breath.
If your cat`s breath smells poorly or unfavorable in some other way, it`s essential to schedule an appointment with your veterinarian. When you take your cat to the vet, it`s highly likely that your vet will conduct teeth cleaning to rid of any problematic elements, like plaque and tartar build-up.
Smelly cats might have simply expressed their anal glands. Just like with dogs, cats sometimes release the contents of their anal glands. This is normal and results in an overwhelming, foul fishy smell. Another cause of stinky rear-ends is diarrhea.
A healthy cat`s breath should have minimal smell. The Ontario SCPA Humane Society indicates your cat`s breath should smell fairly neutral, and any sort of bad smell is a sign of oral hygiene problems or other health issues. A fishy smell, which is common with cats, is almost always a sign of a problem.
Bad Breath

When kidneys start to fail, they become less capable of removing waste from the bloodstream. As this waste builds up, your cat`s breath will smell worse. The bad breath associated with kidney disease may have an ammonia odor.

What is Feline Stomatitis? Feline Stomatitis is a condition seen in many cats where chronic inflammation affects the soft tissues of the mouth (gingiva and mucosa). It is also known as gingivostomatitis, lymphoplasmacytic stomatitis, or more accurately mucositis.
When an animal dies in the home, it will naturally start to decay. As it does, it gives off organic compound odorant molecules which we detect with our olefactory sense. The odor may be slight at first, but after about three days after the death of the animal, the odor can be quite strong.
This is evidence of the cat`s immune response to the presence of plaque and is often painful. Much like morning breath in humans, the plaque and bacterial overgrowth is what causes the powerful, fishy smell coming from your cat`s mouth.
Let`s face it, they do eat some pretty funky food. When it`s outside the norm, there can be various reasons for the stink such as periodontal disease, lymphocytic plasmacytic stomatitis, upper respiratory infections, oral cancers, kidney disease, liver disease, diabetes or intestinal blockage.
The most common cause of bad breath in cats is periodontal disease. By taking care of your cat`s oral health at home, you can prevent your cat from developing stinky breath. Other medical illnesses, such as diabetes and kidney disease, can also cause bad breath.
Of all the various types of bad breath, ammonia breath can be one of the most unpleasant to experience. Individuals unlucky enough to suffer from such an affliction often liken their breath to a “fishy” smell or similar to that of urine.
End-stage kidney failure symptoms in cats include the general symptoms listed above, as well as dull, sunken eyes, inability to walk, body odor, urinary or bowel incontinence, seizures, confusion, refusal to eat or drink, twitching, blindness, pacing, and restlessness, withdrawing, hiding, and running away.
Feline stomatitis is believed to be an autoimmune disease. Often found in cats with other autoimmune diseases – such as feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) or feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) – stomatitis in cats is caused when the cat`s immune system overreacts to plaque on the teeth.
The first step in the treatment of stomatitis is removal of some or all of the teeth. The reasoning behind such an aggressive first line of treatment involves the removal of all plaque retentive surfaces (i.e. teeth) in the mouth and thus reduction of oral bacteria.
Given that gingivitis leads to periodontitis, most cats with periodontitis will show signs of gingivitis (redness, swelling, bleeding along the gingiva at the base of the teeth), and may also be reluctant or unwilling to eat, drool, turn their heads to the side when chewing, and develop halitosis.
The First Signs – The first signs that your cat may be entering their final stages typically include lack of appetite, fatigue or lethargy, difficulty moving around, and changes in alertness.
Can a Cat Sense Death? Cats do seem to be aware of death, but it is hard to know how much they understand the concept and whether they fully understand the finality of their own passing. They certainly understand when they are feeling ill or that something is different or wrong.
Even cats that constantly fight can grieve the loss of a feuding partner. While no-one will ever know if a cat understands death, they certainly know that a fellow housemate is missing and that something has changed in the house.
Solutions: If your cat`s anal glands become infected, clogged, or abscessed, they will cause a foul odor around your kitty`s rear end. You need to consult a veterinarian to empty their anal glands, to drain an abscess, to receive antibiotics to deal with an infection, or to diagnose the problem behind the soft stools.
Bad smell “every now and then”

Most likely this is caused by the cat`s anal glands. These two sac-like glands just inside the anus can become full, and a cat may empty the contents in her environment, especially if she becomes excited or fearful.

Yeast infections – This parmesan cheese, or stinky feet, odor is caused by a yeast infection that typically occurs in the ears. When left untreated, a yeast infection can lead to a more serious infection, pain, and secondary issues like hearing loss. Atopy – Skin odors are often caused by allergies and skin conditions.
The good news is that gingivitis – inflammation of the gums – is the earliest stage of periodontal (gum) disease and is completely reversible with good oral care. Plaque is the starting point for gingivitis. Plaque is filled with bacteria that can irritate and inflame the gums if it isn`t removed.
Left untreated, bacterial infection of the gingival sulcus can progress to tooth support loss (periodontal disease). The cause of stomatitis is unknown.
The most common liver diseases are those seen usually in middle-aged and older cats – inflammatory diseases such as cholangiohepatitis and lymphocytic cholangitis, hepatid lipidosis (fatty liver) which happens when the liver function shuts down due to another serious illness such as diabetes (or anything that cause the …

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. My cats nose is stopped up on antibiotics. She has a loss of appetite, acting normal though. Is 3 ounces of can food enough in 24h? 9 pound cat
ANSWER : A. Cats with stopped up noses tend to eat much less, as you’ve noted, because they can’t smell their food as well. And the smell of food is pretty important to a cat’s appetite. You can start by warming up the food in a microwave – not too hot, test it yourself by putting your finger right in the center, as the temperature of microwave food can vary – as this will intensify the smell and hopefully make your cat more interested.

Saline nose drops, like those that are used on little kids, are safe to use on a cat to clean the discharge that is dried around and in the nose. There’s a brand called Little Noses that’s available in the U.S. That I like. You can put it on a q-tip and try to remove the debris. Humidifying the air with a humidifier can help as well, or you can put the cat in the bathroom and run the shower enough to generate steam. Don’t use “real” nose drops like Neo-synephrine or anything else like that – cats quickly build up resistance to them.

A 3 oz can of food is an OK amount in 24 hours, but do try the techniques above to help your cat get more interested in food. You might also try some baby food – no garlic or onions in the ingredients – as cats usually really like the taste of it.

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

Read Full Q/A … : I found Pickle on

Q. My senior cat has very bad breath. It smells like a dead animal.
His teeth were removed earlier this year so what else could cause this bad breath?
ANSWER : A. If hi doesn’t have bad teeth or/and gingivitis he may have problem with excessive acid production in the stomach or other gastrointestinal problems.

Read Full Q/A … : Symptoms of Stomatitis

Q. 5 Yr old female cat change in behavior last 2 mos: hides, sleeps all the time, meows when touched, decrease appetite; last 1-2 wks wobbley.
ANSWER : A. While I think neurologic disease is certainly a concern based on what you’re describing, and should be ruled out with a good neuro exam (full examination of spinal reflexes and cranial nerves), a cat that sleeps all the time and is wobbly could have many things going on. What you’re describing sounds like generalized weakness to me, and that could be caused by heart disease, liver disease, kidney disease, anemia (lots of causes to this) or metabolic/hormonal conditions like diabetes. Often cats “look” neurologic when in fact they’re just really weak.

However, as far as specific neurologic conditions that might cause what you’re seeing, chronic ear infections or a polyp in the inner or middle ear can affect the vestibular nerve and affect balance, some drugs if used long term (metronidazole) can cause it as well. Other things include intervertebral disk disease (slipped disk), cancer in the spinal cord, thiamine deficiency (not a problem if your cat eats a commercially-prepared diet) and feline infectious peritonitis.

Unfortunately the only way to start figuring out what’s going on is likely with lab work (complete blood count, chemistry panel, and urinalysis) and x-rays for starters (likely of the spine). And as I said above a good neuro exam is critical to starting to figure out whether it’s a neuro problem or not. Your vet will possibly recommend other tests based on the initial results. If you’d like to consult further about exactly what’s going on with your cat select the “consult” button.

Q. My cat of 15 years male was diagnose with hyperthyroidism started coughing tonight for about 10 minutes an then stopped.
ANSWER : A. If your cat is vomiting there could be several underlying causes. I guess the first thing I would want to check is the thyroid level, since I have definitely seen cats that were at one point “controlled” on a specific dose of medication no longer be controlled, and the dosage has to be adjusted. This is why we always recommend rechecking thyroid levels yearly, even in hyperthyroid cats that are clinically doing well.

If the thyroid levels have recently been checked and are stable, then I’d start looking for other causes, such as GI disease. Other possibilities include kidney disease, which can definitely cause vomiting and typically goes along with hyperthyroidism (as well as just being a geriatric cat). Always a good idea to check liver values as well, as liver disease is a common problem in older cats too.

So since your cat is hyperthyroid the first step to diagnosing causes of vomiting is running full blood work – complete blood count, chemistry panel, and urinalysis – to look for some of the things I mentioned above. If nothing turns up, imaging with x-rays or ultrasound or both will likely provide a lot more information. Good luck.

Q. Cat is deficating on rugs, not litter box. Has never done this until this year. We drove from NY to FL, could there be a connection?
ANSWER : A. Sudden changes in bowel or litter box behavior can be caused by both behavioral or medical reasons. Scheduling a wellness exam with your local vet to rule out any problems (and also to bring in a stool sample) is the best first step. Problems such as digestive upset, constipation, diarrhea or even arthritis in older cats making it harder to get into the box can all cause this problem.

If your cat checks out healthy, it is possible that stress such as another person or pet in the home, age, or environment are causing the problem. Make sure that the litter used is the same, and if it needs to be changed that it is done gradually- cats are very picky about what they like as litter. Making sure bedding, food and water are not too close to the litter can also help as cats do not like to potty near these objects usually. For arthritic cats, a step or lowered box can make getting in and out easier to allow for proper use of the box. Keeping the box clean is also a must for cats.

As for cleaning up accidents, using a product such as an enzymatic cleaner may be helpful. These products break down urine and stool particles left in the accident area, and may deter your cat from using the spot as a bathroom again.

Q. I have a cat with that virur (aids) could u tell me about her disposition and care
ANSWER : A. Thanks for your question.

Unfortunately the discussion about what you asked has no straightforward answers and can be quite complex.

First thing that I would double check, considering that your cat is very young, is whether she is really infected. It is important to remember that kittens born to FIV-infected queens will receive antibodies from the queen via the milk, and so will test positive early in life though they may not be infected. Kittens with a positive test result should always be retested when they are 5-6 months of age.

Many FIV infected cats are able to live happily with the virus for a long period of time, and indeed the virus will not necessarily ever cause clinical disease.

Different factors will influence the onset of disease in your cat including:

– The ”subtype” of FIV your cat is infected with,

– Her immune response

– The presence or absence of other infectious agents.

To maintain a good quality of life for your cat, I will give you these general guidelines, but you will then find certainly helpful to speak with your veterinarian for specific cases.

– Some antiviral medications used in human patients with HIV infection have also been shown to help some cats with FIV infection. Interferons may have anti-viral effects and modify immune responses. A recombinant feline interferon (feline interferon omega) is available in some countries. Down side is the cost usually.

– Keep your cat away from other cats and possible source of infections;

– Maintain good quality nutrition;

– Keep your cat indoor if possible regularly checked by your veterinarian;

– Keep your cat away from non-infected cats.