Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. You should contact an eye specialist and get a eye exam. If he already has cataracts I would venture a no with just eye drops to help him. But there are other things that can be done that the specialist could tell you more about and have much more knowledge than I do on this subject.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Currently, no eye drops effectively remove or treat cataracts in dogs. Products that claim they can remove or treat cataracts may use their language carefully to prevent you from understanding what they actually do.
Kinostat contains ingredients that may help to reduce inflammation and lubricate the eyes, which can be beneficial for dogs with diabetes. It has been noted during tests that dogs treated with Kinostat had an 85% lesser chance of developing diabetic cataracts within 9 months.
Kinostat® prevents diabetic cataracts by preventing the metabolism of excess glucose to sorbitol independent of hyperglycemia levels present.
Topical steroids may be recommended, but these medications can be systemically absorbed and dysregulate the dog`s diabetes. Surgical management — Cataract surgery to remove the lens is the only way to restore vision and is considered the gold standard approach. Reported success rates are around 90% to 95% in most dogs.
Veterinarians say there`s no known way to reverse or even slow the progression of cataracts. In immature cataracts, your vet may suggest eye drops until cataracts progress further. But generally, they`ll tell you cataract surgery is the only option.
LIU is managed mostly by topical corticosteroids (Prednefrin Forte® and Maxidex® eye drops) or topical NSAIDs (Voltaren® eye drops). Initially the drops are used BID to TID as required to get the perilimbal hyperaemia to resolve, then SID long term. Some dogs will be able to be reduced to every other day therapy.
The best way to resolve dry eye caused by diabetes is to work with your doctor to create a treatment plan that keeps your blood sugar levels well managed. Artificial tears and prescription eye drops can help relieve symptoms while you work with your healthcare professional to control your diabetes.
Unfortunately, you would be mistaken to think that the same eye drops you use are suitable for dogs. You should not use human eye drops on dogs. If your dog is experiencing eye irritation, contact your vet and take them in to get an eye examination and possibly eye drops that are safe for dogs.
Generally the cataract has matured and the dog is blind in a matter of weeks. Until recently, the development of blindness in a diabetic dog was basically a foregone conclusion but there is a new product called Kinostat® which has changed this.
If your dog`s vision is seriously affected by a cataract, visit a veterinarian right away. If the cataract is a result of diabetes, it`s possible to reverse the progress by changing your dog`s diet and insulin intake. If the cataract has progressed far enough, surgery is also an option.
It`s true that a dog can pass away within a month or two of beginning to show signs of diabetes, but many will live for a year or two after diagnosis with appropriate treatment. Some do very well for even longer, particularly if they have a dedicated pet parent who can continue to provide the care they need.
Cataract surgery can reverse a cataract caused by diabetes. This short outpatient procedure involves removing and replacing a damaged lens with a healthy artificial lens.
When a dog with cataracts is left untreated, they can become blind. The cataract completely blocks light from entering the eye through the lens and keeps your dog from seeing. The condition is still treatable at that time with surgery, but without treatment, it can develop into glaucoma.
YES! Carrots contain natural forms of Vitamin A (also known as retinal) a vitamin that supports our and our dog`s eyesight helping to keep their vision clear and helping prevent problems such as cataracts in the future.
In addition to vision loss, chronic cataracts can cause excruciatingly painful, unmanageable secondary issues within the eye, for which the only recourse is enucleation, or surgical removal of the eye. This happens because the lens continuously degenerates over time, sparking chronic inflammatory changes around it.
One popular method is using a warm, damp cloth to gently clean and soothe the eye area. Another option is using a saline solution to flush out any irritants.
Some of the vitamins proven to do this include vitamin C, vitamin A, and vitamin E. These antioxidants will aid in the prevention of macular degeneration, which affects the retina of the eye. This has proven that the vitamins may be able to protect diabetic eyes against conditions such as retinopathy.
Optimal combinations of vitamins B1, B2, B6, L-methylfolate, methylcobalamin (B12), C, D, natural vitamin E complex, lutein, zeaxanthin, alpha-lipoic acid, and n-acetylcysteine are identified for protecting the retina and choroid. Certain medical foods have been successfully used as therapy for retinopathy.
Over-the-counter (nonprescription) nasal sprays and eye drops can pose a serious risk to animals that ingest them. The problem ingredients—imidazoline decongestants, phenylephrine, and xylitol—are common in products to treat allergies, colds, flu, and red eyes.
Eye drops: Naphazoline, an ingredient found in most redness relief formulas, and brimonidine, found in eye drops for glaucoma, can both cause a serious drop in heart rate and blood pressure, even if small amounts are ingested.
Most dogs with diabetes will quickly see changes in vision and formation of cataracts after becoming diabetic. Affected dogs often lose sight within five to six months of being diagnosed. Vision loss from diabetes can occur quickly, with complete vision loss occurring within 48 hours of the first symptom.
Cataracts can develop very slowly or almost overnight. You probably won`t notice any change in your dog during the early stages, but once the cataracts are mature (completely blocking light transmission to the retina), she will be blind.
The results of this study suggest that the majority of dogs with diabetes will develop cataracts within 5-6 months from the time of diagnosis of the disease, and that approximately 80% of dogs will develop cataracts within 16 months of diagnosis.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My seven year old Lab has cataracts in both eyes. He is diabetic and has thyroid issues as well. Would eye drops help him?
ANSWER : A. You should contact an eye specialist and get a eye exam. If he already has cataracts I would venture a no with just eye drops to help him. But there are other things that can be done that the specialist could tell you more about and have much more knowledge than I do on this subject.

Q. How do I know if I am losing my cat. She is 8 and weighs about 20lbs. She is having issues breathing and I don’t have any money to take her to the vet
ANSWER : A. Your cat really should be seen by a vet. Her weight may be the only thing causing her breathing problems, but without an exam, there’s no way to know for sure.

If you are in financial difficulty, there are ways of still getting your pet treated by a veterinarian. Ask if they take Care Credit and apply online. This is a credit card specifically for medical, dental, and veterinary expenses.

Call a local animal shelter or college of veterinary medicine in your area and ask if they have a low- or no-cost veterinary care program.

GiveForward and Youcaring.com are crowd funding websites that help you raise money to help take care of your pets

Harley’s Hope Foundation is an organization that ensures low income pet parents and their companion or service animals remain together when issues arise.

Many breed rescues and groups have specials funds available for owners who need financial assistance, such as the Special Needs Dobermans, Labrador Lifeline, and Pitbull Rescue Central.

Banfield Pet Hospital has its own programs for owners that can’t afford their pet’s care.

Feline Veterinary Emergency Assistance (FVEAP) works with seniors, people with disabilities, people who

have lost their job, good Samaritans who rescue a cat or kitten who may need financial assistance to save a beloved companion.

The Feline Veterinary Emergency Assistance Program is a nonprofit 501 (c)(3) organization that provides financial assistance to cat and kitten guardians who are unable to afford veterinary services to save their companions when life-threatening illness or injury strikes.

God’s Creatures Ministry helps pay for veterinarian bills for those who need help.

IMOM is dedicated to insure that no companion animal has to be euthanized simply because their caretaker

is financially challenged.

The Onyx & Breezy Foundation has many programs including helping people with medical bills. They are a good resource for information.

Brown Dog Foundation provides funding to families with a sick pet that would likely respond to treatment, but due to circumstances, there is not enough money immediately available to pay.

Some groups help with specific disease, such as Canine Cancer Awareness, The Magic Bullet Fund, Helping Harley Fund, and Muffin Diabetes Fund.

The Pet Fund and Redrover.org are great sources for help to care for your pet.

The Humane Society website has many links to other organizations that help with veterinary expenses.

Read Full Q/A … : Vetinfo

Q. Joshua was put on Neo/Poly/Bac Optic Ointment & Optimune Cyclosporine 1% for dry eye and eye ulcers. It’s been 9 mo. since I can’t afford it?
ANSWER : A. I would recheck with a vet to see what the tear production is like and also add in Genteal ointment or drops to help with the dry eye. If it’s only dry eye you should be able to discontinue the neo poly bac, but the cyclosporine will also help so keep that up. Only way to know if it’s helping is to get a schirmer tear test done and see the values. Also I would recommend seeing an eye doctor for him to determine if there is more going on than just the dry eye, which is more than likely causing the ulcers.

Q. Can you put your sick 16yr cat down with pills, cannot afford a veterinarian.
ANSWER : A. If you are in financial difficulty, there are ways of still getting your pet treated by a veterinarian. Ask if they take Care Credit and apply online. This is a credit card specifically for medical, dental, and veterinary expenses.

Call a local animal shelter or college of veterinary medicine in your area and ask if they have a low- or no-cost veterinary care program.

GiveForward and Youcaring.com are crowd funding websites that help you raise money to help take care of your pets

Harley’s Hope Foundation is an organization that ensures low income pet parents and their companion or service animals remain together when issues arise.

Many breed rescues and groups have specials funds available for owners who need financial assistance, such as the Special Needs Dobermans, Labrador Lifeline, and Pitbull Rescue Central.

Banfield Pet Hospital has its own programs for owners that can’t afford their pet’s care.

Feline Veterinary Emergency Assistance (FVEAP) works with seniors, people with disabilities, people who

have lost their job, good Samaritans who rescue a cat or kitten who may need financial assistance to save a beloved companion.

The Feline Veterinary Emergency Assistance Program is a nonprofit 501 (c)(3) organization that provides financial assistance to cat and kitten guardians who are unable to afford veterinary services to save their companions when life-threatening illness or injury strikes.

God’s Creatures Ministry helps pay for veterinarian bills for those who need help.

IMOM is dedicated to insure that no companion animal has to be euthanized simply because their caretaker

is financially challenged.

The Onyx & Breezy Foundation has many programs including helping people with medical bills. They are a good resource for information.

Brown Dog Foundation provides funding to families with a sick pet that would likely respond to treatment, but due to circumstances, there is not enough money immediately available to pay.

Some groups help with specific disease, such as Canine Cancer Awareness, The Magic Bullet Fund, Helping Harley Fund, and Muffin Diabetes Fund.

The Pet Fund and Redrover.org are great sources for help to care for your pet.

The Humane Society website has many links to other organizations that help with veterinary expenses.

Q. Eye discharge, occasional sneezing. Need over the counter solution. Cannot afford vet. Roughly 3 months old, 3lb
ANSWER : A. If you are in financial difficulty, there are ways of still getting your pet treated by a veterinarian. Ask if they take Care Credit and apply online. This is a credit card specifically for medical, dental, and veterinary expenses.

Call a local animal shelter and ask if they have a low-cost pet clinic that works with people with limited incomes or call a college of veterinary medicine in your area and ask about a low- or no-cost veterinary care program.

GiveForward and Youcaring.com are crowd funding websites that help you raise money to help take care of your pets

Harley’s Hope Foundation is an organization that ensures low income pet parents and their companion or service animals remain together when issues arise.

Many breed rescues and groups have specials funds available for owners who need financial assistance, such as the Special Needs Dobermans, Labrador Lifeline, and Pitbull Rescue Central.

Banfield Pet Hospital has its own programs for owners that can’t afford their pet’s care.

The Onyx & Breezy Foundation has many programs including helping people with medical bills. They are a good resource for information.

Brown Dog Foundation provides funding to families with a sick pet that would likely respond to treatment, but due to circumstances, there is not enough money immediately available to pay.

Some groups help with specific disease, such as Canine Cancer Awareness, The Magic Bullet Fund, Helping Harley Fund, and Muffin Diabetes Fund.

The Pet Fund and Redrover.org are great sources for help to care for your pet.

The Humane Society website has many links to other organizations that help with veterinary expenses.

Read Full Q/A … : Vetinfo

Q. Seven month old cat has watery diarrhea for five days. Asks perfectly normal. What can I give him to help with diarrhea ?
ANSWER : A. Anytime a pet has prolonged diarrhea, it is always a good idea to schedule a wellness check with your veterinarian. Bringing in a sample of your cat’s stool is also a good idea to check for any internal parasites or illnesses that may be causing it.

Diarrhea can be caused by a large number of things ranging from illness, internal parasites, digestive upset or even dietary issues. Ruling out any more serious issues first is best, then looking to others such as stress or diet is next. Cats can have issues with some grain products such as wheat, corn and soy, and can even have issues with dairy and fish products! (Cats are naturally lactose-intolerant). Changing the diet may help to firm up the stools.

For other additives, adding a probiotic such as Forti-flora from your vet, or a teaspoon of plain yogurt added to the food can help. Adding in a small amount of pureed pumpkin to the diet may also help as the added fiber can firm up the stool. However if the stool does not improve after a few days of treatment, a follow-up with your vet is best.

Q. I have a kitten (about 3 months old) who’s ear is red and squishy sounding today (just started today) I can’t afford to go to a vet, what can I do?
ANSWER : A. If you are in financial difficulty, there are ways of still getting your pet treated by a veterinarian. Ask if they take Care Credit and apply online. This is a credit card specifically for medical, dental, and veterinary expenses.

Call a local animal shelter and ask if they have a low-cost pet clinic that works with people with limited incomes or call a college of veterinary medicine in your area and ask about a low- or no-cost veterinary care program.

GiveForward and Youcaring.com are crowd funding websites that help you raise money to help take care of your pets

Harley’s Hope Foundation is an organization that ensures low income pet parents and their companion or service animals remain together when issues arise.

Many breed rescues and groups have specials funds available for owners who need financial assistance, such as the Special Needs Dobermans, Labrador Lifeline, and Pitbull Rescue Central.

Banfield Pet Hospital has its own programs for owners that can’t afford their pet’s care.

The Onyx & Breezy Foundation has many programs including helping people with medical bills. They are a good resource for information.

Brown Dog Foundation provides funding to families with a sick pet that would likely respond to treatment, but due to circumstances, there is not enough money immediately available to pay.

Some groups help with specific disease, such as Canine Cancer Awareness, The Magic Bullet Fund, Helping Harley Fund, and Muffin Diabetes Fund.

The Pet Fund and Redrover.org are great sources for help to care for your pet.

The Humane Society website has many links to other organizations that help with veterinary expenses.

Q. Weak, discharge from eyes, swelling on right eye, does not want to open eyes. What is wrong?
ANSWER : A. If the discharge from the eye is green or yellow in color, it can indicate a secondary infection. Swollen eyes can be caused by a number of things ranging from allergies to infections, to injury to the eye itself or surrounding areas.

It is best to have your pet’s eye examined by your local vet. They will most likely wish to place a stain in the eye that can check for damage such as cuts or scratches. An ointment can then be given to help reduce inflammation, pain and take care of infection.

Until you can get to the vet, be sure to not let your pet scratch or paw at their eye as this can make things worse. You can also use a warm wet washcloth to gently remove any debris and allow the eye to open some, providing relief. However, if symptoms worsen, or the swelling travels to the face, head or neck, it may indicate a serious allergic reaction which should be treated immediately.