Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. If she vomited some of the tablets then it is very good sign. however, ibuprofen is very dangerous to dogs and your vet may recommend further treatment and intravenous fluids.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Although relatively safe in humans, ibuprofen and other NSAIDs can be extremely harmful to dogs. Poisoning may happen when pets get into the owner`s medications. In some cases, owners may administer ibuprofen to treat their pet`s pain prior to consulting a veterinarian.
Vomiting or Diarrhea

It is not as concerning for your dog to vomit 2-3 times within 10 minutes and then be fine. If your dog vomits three or more times over a period of eight hours, you should be worried. If there is any blood in either, you should take your dog to the vet immediately.

Some symptoms of ibuprofen poisoning in dogs, like vomiting and diarrhea, occur quickly, either immediately or within a few hours. Other symptoms, like stomach ulcers, may take longer to develop. Long-term and short-term symptoms include: Vomiting.
Renal (kidney) symptoms of toxicity: If the toxic dose ingested is high, you may notice symptoms related to renal impairment. They are usually detectable 12-24 hours after ingestion and you will notice increased thirst and urination, blood in the urine and general lethargy and malaise.
If given to dogs, it can be absorbed into their system in as little as 30 minutes, depending on how recently they`ve eaten. Accidental ingestion by animals is fairly common due to how prolific this drug use.
Your dog is most likely fine if he vomits once without any other symptoms, according to veterinarians. If your dog`s vomiting can be described as any of the following, then it is time to start getting concerned: Continuous vomiting. Chronic vomiting.
Wait and Observe. After a dog vomits, it`s generally best to withhold food for several hours and observe, but don`t withhold water. 2 If your dog vomits one time and then acts completely normal, you can probably resume your normal feeding routine within six to 12 hours or when the next meal is due.
Toxic consumption:

Ibuprofen: Signs of toxicity may be seen at doses of 50 mg/kg (22 mg/lb) in dogs and 25 mg/kg (11 mg/lb) in cats. With long-term administration, toxicity has been seen in dogs with doses as low as 5-6 mg/kg (2-3 mg/lb).

A typical pill has 200 mg of ibuprofen, which is actually quite a lot, so it doesn`t take many pills to cause a poisoning. The first level of toxicity involves ulceration of the stomach. This leads to vomiting with or without blood, appetite loss, and/or stools that are black from digested blood.
It is important to give your dog`s digestive system some time to recoup and rest from the vomiting by not feeding your dog for 12-24 hours. You can give your dog small amounts of water to keep them hydrated. Food and large amounts of water will only aggravate your dog`s upset stomach.
Dehydration from continual vomiting definitely makes them sick. The way to rehydrate a vomiting dog is not to give water by mouth: the correct way to do it is to give fluids either in the vein or under the skin. So, when your dog vomits, the thing to do is take away all the food and water for 24 hours.
Ginger is one of the best home remedies for your dog`s vomiting and upset stomach. You can make ginger tea by boiling fresh ginger root in water, cooling it, and giving it to your dog in small amounts throughout the day.
There is no safe ibuprofen (Advil) dosage for dogs. It is dangerous. In fact, even Tylenol and aspirin can be unsafe. Here`s what you need to know.
The mean terminal half-life of Carprofen is approximately 8 hours (range 4.5-9.8 hours) after single oral doses varying from 1-35 mg/kg of body weight. After a 100 mg single intravenous bolus dose, the mean elimination half-life was approximately 11.7 hours in the dog.
Our results supported that the Caplets took the least amount of time to dissolve the coating and release the Ibuprofen. It took an average of 20 min/gram. The Gel Capsules took on average 126 min/gram and the tablets took 26 min/gram.
Ibuprofen is a weak acid drug (BCS class 2a; pKa ≈ 4.85) with an extremely low solubility in the stomach. This implies that the oral absorption is depending upon gastric emptying of ibuprofen in the small intestine, where dissolution and permeation will take place in the more neutral pH environment.
Your goal is to give your dog 1 cup of water per 40 pounds of body weight every 2 to 3 hours explains Bethlehem Vet Hospital, and you should gradually increase the amount after 12 hours.
Contact vet: If your dog still won`t drink water, or if he/she is suffering from an illness, you should contact a veterinarian as soon as possible. In case of illness proper hydration is important to the recovery process and it is therefore very important that your pet gets professional help.
If your dog is vomiting, it usually happens at least a few minutes after your dog has eaten. Your dog`s stomach contents will probably be mushier and will look and smell less like the food they ate. In this case, it`s time to call the vet.
Can I give Ibuprofen to my Pet? Do not give Ibuprofen to your dog or cat under any circumstances. Ibuprofen and naproxen are common and effective medications used to treat inflammation and pain in humans, but they should not be given to pets. These drugs can be toxic (poisonous) to dogs and cats.
Your vet may suggest making the animal vomit if ingestion just occurred, but your pet may also need intravenous fluid support or treatment with specific medications and antidotes to combat the toxin.
Ibuprofen is toxic to dogs because it blocks an enzyme called cyclooxygenase that, in addition to reducing inflammation, also has roles in promoting blood flow through the kidneys and producing protective prostaglandins for the mucosal lining of the stomach. Dogs are much more sensitive to the effects of ibuprofen.
Ibuprofen is a commonly-used OTC medication. While it doesn`t usually cause liver damage, it can be hard on the kidneys. It`s important to follow OTC dosing instructions, as this will help lower your risk of side effects, including kidney damage.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My shih ztu got into Advil, she vomited ..dont know how many..is the fact she vomited good, is a vet visit warranted
ANSWER : A. If she vomited some of the tablets then it is very good sign. however, ibuprofen is very dangerous to dogs and your vet may recommend further treatment and intravenous fluids.

Q. My dog has been throwing up a clear liquid (a little slimey) but otherwise acts fine. Could something be wrong?
ANSWER : A. How long has he been doing this? Ongoing vomiting (>2 weeks) warrants a vet visit, but if it’s a one-off, or happens very infrequently then it could be due to something he ate disagreeing with him. Is he is bright, alert and happy in himself I would monitor him, start keeping a vomit journal (seriously) of when he vomits, how much, what the vomit was like, what he was doing before and any other notes. This will be really useful for your vet if it requires further investigatoon. You can also try bland food – boiled chicken and white rice – in small amounts on his vomit days to give his tummy a rest. Withhold for 8h after a vomit and reintroduce the bland diet in small, frequent meals.

Q. My puppy is throwing up her food this morning and yellow foamy stuff. Please help!
ANSWER : A. If the vomiting has only occurred once, it may be due to the fact that there was something causing a minor upset stomach in your pup. Yellow foam is often acid, and tummies that are upset or that have been empty for too long can cause this to appear in vomit. It may just be that your puppy needs an extra meal in the day to help keep her stomach happy. Eating a meal too quickly can also cause a pup to vomit up undigested food and foam, and feeding smaller meals more often, or slowing down your dog’s eating can help.

If the vomiting has only happened once, pick up your puppy’s food for an hour or two and then offer a bland meal of plain boiled chicken and plain rice. These bland ingredients can help settle upset stomachs while being enticing “people food”. If the vomiting does not occur again, you can return to a normal feeding schedule.

However, if the vomiting continues, worsens, or new symptoms appear along with it, then it is a good idea to schedule an appointment with your vet to rule out any more serious causes.

Q. What are the ways and/or steps to become a veterinarian?
ANSWER : A. Being a veterinarian is a rewarding career, but does involve a lot of schooling, experience and knowledge. Many people try out veterinary medicine through being a tech or assistant first, then continue on to veterinary school if they decide that is the path for them. If you are still in high school, the best way to start gaining experience is just by volunteering at your local animal shelter. Some clinics will also hire kennel technicians, a good starting job that gets you into a clinic and viewing procedures while working your way up. You can major in anything you want in college, however there are class prerequisites that must be met to apply for vet school. Majoring in a degree program such as biology, zoology or animal sciences often meets these requirements without having to take extra classes. Working summers as a tech or assistant, staying active in local animal groups and maintaining a high GPA will make you an ideal candidate. Once you are ready to apply for vet school you will need to take a GRE which is an exam graduate and medical schools use to determine how well you might do. Vet schools tend to look for applicants who are active in the community, have experience and have good grades. If considered, you will then have an interview to determine if you’re a good fit! Vet school itself requires four years, the first two focused on classroom and theory subjects such as anatomy, physiology and pathology. Your third year becomes more hands on with lots of labs and “shadowing” of vets in the school. Fourth year is usually entirely clinical rotations to give you a taste of all the things veterinary medicine offers!

Q. My French Bulldog (11 months) threw up after eating and is dry heaving, plus he’s not acting normal. His breathing is nasally and he’s lethargic. Help
ANSWER : A. Vomiting is a common symptom that can be a sign of numerous health issues ranging from minor digestive upset, to bloat or internal illness. If the vomiting has only occurred once and everything else is normal, a bland diet of plain boiled chicken and white rice can help.

Since your Frenchie is having other issues such as trouble breathing and lethargy, it may be a good idea to contact your vet for advice. Minor digestive upset can cause lethargy due to the energy expended in vomiting, however prolonged symptoms usually indicate something more serious is going on.

Bulldogs are one breed that are prone to bloat (though any breed of dog can be affected), a serious medical emergency. Signs of bloat can include a suddenly painful and bloated abdomen, signs of distress such as heavy panting, whining, or trouble breathing, pale gums and tongue, vomiting and diarrhea, or attempting to vomit or defecate without success. If you suspect your dog may be experiencing bloat please contact your vet or emergency clinic immediately.

Q. My cat is excessively scrstching herself., to the point she has sores. She is strictly an indoor cat. Did have flees been treated for 2 months
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. My pet has been vomoncoing for sometimes now and will eat grass and stop eating, still plays and seem happy. I can tell something is wrong
ANSWER : A. I disagree with the other poster. Dogs can vomit for many reasons other than food intolerance, and repeated vomiting warrants a vet visit instead of waiting a week – especially since you didn’t give mih info about the frequency, severity, or duration of this vomiting. In addition, your vet will be a better source of information than a pet store associate. By-products are perfectly good animal parts given a bad name by the marketing departments of companies like Blue Buffalo.

Q. Great Dane, Lab mix is vomiting, lethargic, bloodshot droopy eyes. No appetite. What’s wrong?
ANSWER : A. Vomiting is a common symptom of many illnesses which can range anywhere from minor digestive upset, to mores serious problems such as disease, illness or even bloat.

If your Dane Mix has only vomited once or twice, it may just indicate a minor stomach upset. Picking up food for a few hours then feeding a bland meal of boiled chicken and plain rice can help soothe the stomach and entice eating. However, if the vomiting continues or symptoms persist for more than a day, it may indicate something more serious going on and should be looked at by your vet.

Large and giant breed dogs are more prone to a condition called Bloat, which is considered a medical emergency. Signs of bloat in a dog include a large distended abdomen, pain in the abdomen, signs of distress such as heavy panting, pale gums or tongue, vomiting and diarrhea, or attempting to vomit or defecate without success. If you suspect your dog may be experiencing bloat, contacting your vet or emergency clinic immediately is best.