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Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. If by “hit” you mean “hit by car”, there are many injuries that can go along with this trauma, including bleeding into the lungs, bruising in the lungs, rupture of the spleen and/or bladder, head trauma/brain damage, and spinal fracture. If his leg is obviously fractured you need to get him emergency care immediately, not only because this is painful, but also because there may be even more serious and life-threatening issues on the inside.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

The vet will assess your dog and the extent of her injuries. Based on many factors, the vet will suggest either having the bone repaired, setting the bone, or in very severe cases, amputating the limb. Very likely, your dog will need x-rays of the injured area to assess the type and extent of the fracture.
The bones and ligaments can easily be cracked, stretched or twisted when impact is applied through running, jumping or by virtue of an accident or jolting impact as listed below: Bone fracture. Torn ligaments or tendons. Dislocated joints.
The radial nerve is the largest nerve in the front leg, and is responsible for extending the elbow, wrist and toes. When this nerve is damaged, dogs appear lame, often dragging the front paw on the ground. Trauma above the elbow is the most common cause of radial nerve paralysis in dogs.
A simple rule of thumb to help determine the severity of the injury is that most dogs will not walk on a broken leg, torn ligament, or dislocated joint. A good exam requires two people: one to examine the leg and one to restrain the dog. Dogs that are in pain may bite, even people they love so be cautious.
Most fractures can be repaired very effectively. In many cases, your dog will resume normal activity levels within three to four months after repair. However, if the original fracture involved a joint, your dog may develop some lameness, decreased range of motion, stiffness, or arthritis over time.
WHAT IS A DOG`S BROKEN LEG HEALING TIME? The healing time for a broken leg in a puppy is relatively short (2 to 4 weeks). Younger dogs have more bone building cells and are growing anyway, so their bones are constantly remodeling. For adult dogs, the healing time for a broken leg is 6 to 12 weeks.
Treatment of Broken Leg in Dogs

The options will be of a non-surgical or surgical nature. In the case of a simple, closed fracture, a splint or cast may be all that is required for healing. With a cast or splint, emphasis must be placed on keeping the injured area, and it`s covering clean and dry.

Recovery of Leg Paralysis in Dogs

While there is a good chance of recovery in many cases with supportive care, surgery and other treatments, there are conditions without treatments available. In cases of a viral infection, prevention through vaccination is the best course to ensure your dog is not affected.

The primary signs of nervous system disorders include behavioral changes, seizures, tremors, pain, numbness, lack of coordination, and weakness or paralysis of one or more legs. The effects of an injury on sensory and motor functions depend on its location and severity.
‍Should I take my dog to the vet if they`re limping? Take your dog to the vet`s office immediately if they can`t put any weight on their leg, show extreme pain (this could include crying out), have swelling or injury and are reluctant to move or eat. If your pup is still limping after a day, take them to the vet.
Walk slowly with your recovering dog.

Early in recovery, do make sure that your dog walks really slowly. This will speed up recovery by allowing them to place each leg safely. This is the case whether your dog is recovering from an injury, or has had an operation on a leg or on the spine.

While a sprain is more serious than a simple strain, most dogs make a full recovery from a sprained leg. The biggest challenge most pet parents face is convincing their active and energetic canine companions to take it easy for the roughly six weeks it takes for a sprain to heal.
According to VCA Hospitals, other signs that your dog`s leg might be broken include intense pain, swelling at the site of the fracture, and the leg lying at an awkward angle. If your dog is willing to walk, he won`t put any weight on a leg that`s broken, but will instead carry it above the ground.
If your dog has a broken bone, it`s not likely they will put any weight on the affected limb. Depending on the severity of the break and the amount of pain your dog is in, they can still get around, but they will most undoubtedly limp and avoid using the affected limb.
Certain fractures need to be repaired surgically. A veterinary surgeon will place pins or plates with screws to stabilize the bone until it heals. A splint or cast may be needed after the surgery to provide additional stability. Some fractures require external fixation.
In general, the starting price for basic care is around $600, whereas the broken leg surgery for a dog cost can be as high as $2,000 or more. Of course, your dog`s age, current health status, associated risk factors, and the urgency of the symptoms can all complicate things and potentially raise the price.
And that`s not the weirdest thing about your pet`s front legs. While our arms connect to our skeletons by a collarbone, dogs and cats have nearly lost theirs entirely. Their forelimbs aren`t attached to the rest of their skeleton at all, except by muscle. The hind limbs almost make familiar sense.
Learning that your dog needs to have a leg amputated is very scary. The good news is that dogs, even senior dogs, adapt to having three legs quite quickly. They find their new center of balance and can run and play just like four-legged dogs.
You can also check for any bruising around the leg of your dog if you suspect it has a sprain but also a fracture. You may not see it right away if your dog is furry, but the affected area will slowly turn purple, swell, or become tender to the touch.
An inability to move is a big concern and can have many causes including a slipped disc, a fracture in the neck or back, tick paralysis etc. There is no doubt he needs to be seen by a vet. If unable to transport him, you may need to request an emergency home visit from your local clinic.
Symptoms of Paralysis Due to Spinal Cord Injury in Dogs

Pain when back is touched. Inability to walk. Not moving hind legs. No sensation or feeling of pain in areas below the injury site.

Signs of shock include rapid breathing that may be noisy, rapid heart rate with a weak pulse, pale (possibly even white) mucous membranes (gums, lips, under eyelids), severe depression (listlessness), and cool extremities (limbs and ears). The dog may vomit. Shock requires immediate emergency treatment.
The awareness of pain and pressure in the deep layers of the skin, muscles and joints is defined as having deep pain sensation. It`s a hopeful sign and a good prognosis for the recovery of a paralyzed dog. Veterinarians test for pain because it elicits a big reaction.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My Staffordshire terrier was hit last night and clearly broken his left front leg, what are some other things to looks for hipsbor back injuries
ANSWER : A. If by “hit” you mean “hit by car”, there are many injuries that can go along with this trauma, including bleeding into the lungs, bruising in the lungs, rupture of the spleen and/or bladder, head trauma/brain damage, and spinal fracture. If his leg is obviously fractured you need to get him emergency care immediately, not only because this is painful, but also because there may be even more serious and life-threatening issues on the inside.

Q. My dog has a hard time walking on his front legs. I was told he has nerve damage and he was walking on three legs now it seems to be both front legs
ANSWER : A. Problems with walking in the front legs can be caused by a large number of things. Arthritis in older dogs can cause joint pain and stiffness which may make walking hard. Nerve or muscular damage may also cause problems.

With nerve or muscle damage there is often a loss of muscle tone in the affected limbs. Limbs may look skinnier than unaffected ones, and may lose overall muscle mass. In some cases, treatment for pain or soreness may help improve symptoms some. Depending on the severity of the damage, some dogs may recover while others have permanent damage.

It may also be that if your dog was putting all his weight on one front leg to help the other, that the good front leg is now stiff and sore. Restricting exercise, giving a supplement to help joints and bones and following your veterinarian’s recommendations for care can all help your dog to feel a little better.

Q. How do I get my dog to stop chewing on things? I kennel her when I leave for a few hours, but I can’t go to the mailbox without her eating something.
ANSWER : A. If she’s young, then this is just normal puppy behavior. Don’t worry about it. The thing about puppies is, they explore using their mouths. If your puppy grabs a coat hanger, or a slipper, you should roll up a newspaper, and smack yourself on the head with it for leaving those things out.. your puppy is going to explore things, that’s normal! It is 100% up to YOU to keep those things away from your puppy when your puppy is unsupervised… even for just a moment.

Remember to never scold your puppy for grabbing these things. They are just curious little cuties, and they don’t chew things up to bother us.. Dogs do not have intentional thought, so they aren’t ever doing anything ON PURPOSE to us.. The most important thing you can do when your puppy is chewing something you don’t want her to be chewing is TRADE her the inappropriate item with a toy of hers, so she understands “no honey, that isn’t what puppies chew on… THIS is what puppies chew on!” and then begin playing with her using her toy to show her that TOYS ARE FUN.. Way more fun than a boring ol’ coat hanger.

Another helpful thing you can do is have two bags of toys. In each bag is many different kinds of toys. Lots of chew toys, lots of soft squeaky toys, lots of rope-type toys, a bunch of balls.. All kinds of things! For one week you have bag#1’s toys out for your puppy to play with.. At the end of the one week, you collect those toys, and you bring out bag#2! The toys will be more interesting/feel like new to your puppy, which will in-turn, make her chew less inappropriate things. Her toys are too fun to care about that dumb Wii-mote that you left laying around.

Hope this helps!

Q. Shiba Inu. He periodically shakes and trembles, usually unrpovoked and seeming for no reason. Usually cuddling helps but not always. Becomes reclusive
ANSWER : A. I do find that Shiba Inu’s are a really sensitive breed. I think the first thing to rule out is pain. That could be pain from a muscle injury or even gastrointestinal pain. Try to pinpoint whether it occurs after a meal or not. He might be painful due to something going on in his GI tract, and the pain is at its worse after he eats.

I’ve also seen a lot of small breeds like Shibas get back pain, and shaking can definitely accompany that as well. If you haven’t see your vet who can perform a good physical exam and look for any signs of muscular pain along the spine or elsewhere. It’s not a bad idea at this point to consider doing some blood work just to screen for any problems that could be affecting organ function, for example.

If he’s healthy otherwise, I think it’s likely that there’s something that’s scaring him at home. These things can be really difficult to identify, and you have to be really aware and note exactly when the shaking occurs, how long it lasts, etc, and look for patterns. Dogs can hear things we can’t, and he may be hearing things you’re missing, and the noise is disturbing to him. Cuddling is a good idea, also working to distract him and desensitize him with toys and treats might help. But like I said above – definitely rule out pain first.

Q. Hello.. My jack russel has started to get a bowed front leg at the ankle and is causing him to limp quiet a lot.. Is there anything that can be done.?
ANSWER : A. It is possible an injury or deformity of the leg is causing the limp and physical changes you are seeing. Sprains, breaks, strains and even nutritional deficiencies may cause the leg to bow and pain/limping to occur. Having a vet take an X-ray and examine the leg is best to determine the cause of the changes and limp as well as the treatment needed. Casting, bed rest, and medications to treat pain may all be needed to help the leg heal. Until you can get to the vet, a regime of strict kennel rest with leashed walks only to go potty outside will help reduce any further injury to the leg and decrease pain.

Read Full Q/A … : Jack Russell FAQs Page!

Q. Have a dachshund who is over weight but this past couple of days she refuses to go up steps and her left back leg is not being used, and she is guntin
ANSWER : A. This particular breed is very susceptible to back problems. Your dog is showing some classic symptoms of back pain- reluctance to climb stairs, weakness or inability to use a rear leg and grunting. Your dog should be examined and have radiographs of her back as soon as possible. Hopefully, she can be treated medically, but sometimes back problems progress quickly to something surgical. The quicker you get an accurate assessment of the extent of her problem, the quicker you dan get her some pain relief.

Read Full Q/A … : Theories of gravitation

Q. My Chihuahua was jumping and suddenly started whining. Now she won’t put her hind leg down, but doesn’t cry when I mess with it. Will it heal on own?
ANSWER : A. Leg injuries are very common in small dogs, especially if they have jumped from a high place, or even stumbled and landed on the leg wrong. Leg injuries can be caused by anything from minor sprains and strains, to full blown breaks or joint tears and even arthritis or luxating patellas (knee joints that slip in and out). If the leg appears swollen, dislocated or there is visible bone or bleeding, veterinary care should be sought. Providing strict kennel rest and decreased activity for a day or two can help with minor injuries, however if the limping continues for more than a day you should make an appointment with your local veterinarian.

Read Full Q/A … : Causes of Limping in Dogs

Q. Whenever I take my dog on walks he always barks at people and others dogs in my neighborhood. What should I do to resolve the problem
ANSWER : A. The very first thing to do is to make sure your dog is getting sufficient physical and mental exercise every day. A tired dog is a good, happy dog and one who is less likely to bark from boredom or frustration. Depending on his breed, age, and health, your dog may require several long walks as well as a good game of chasing the ball and playing with some interactive toys.

Figure out what he gets out of barking and remove it. Don’t give your dog the opportunity to continue the barking behavior.

Ignore your dog’s barking for as long as it takes him to stop. That means don’t give him attention at all while he’s barking. Your attention only rewards him for being noisy. Don’t talk to, don’t touch, or even look at him. When he finally quiets, even to take a breath, reward him with a treat. To be successful with this method, you must wait as long as it takes for him to stop barking. Yelling at him is the equivalent of barking with him.

Get your dog accustomed to whatever causes him to bark. Start with whatever makes him bark at a distance. It must be far enough away that he doesn’t bark when he sees it. Feed him lots of good treats. Move the stimulus a little closer (perhaps as little as a few inches or a few feet to start) and feed treats. If the stimulus moves out of sight, stop giving your dog treats. You want your dog to learn that the appearance of the stimulus leads to good things.

Teach your dog the ‘quiet’ command. Oddly, the first step is to teach your dog to bark on command. Give your dog the command to “speak,” wait for him to bark two or three times, and then stick a tasty treat in front of his nose. When he stops barking to sniff the treat, praise him and give him the treat. Repeat until he starts barking as soon as you say “speak.” Once your dog can reliably bark on command, teach him the “quiet” command. In a calm environment with no distractions, tell him to “speak.” When he starts barking, say “quiet” and stick a treat in front of his nose. Praise him for being quiet and give him the treat.

As in all training, always end training on a good note, even if it is just for obeying something very simple, like the ‘sit’ command. If you dog regresses in training, go back to the last thing he did successfully and reinforce that before moving on again. Keep sessions short, 15-20 minutes max, and do this several times a day.