Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. As you know, this is a normal issue to have with a 3 month old puppy. Be sure that you are never scolding your pup for biting/nipping/teething. This is so natural and normal for them, scolding gives very mixed messages. There are a few things you can do to help teach your pup that nipping on you is inappropriate without the use of scolding.

First off, you should have a toy that YOU own. This toy should be brand new. It should be something like a SOFT braided rope toy. Never allow your pup to play with this toy without you. Never leave this toy on the ground for your pup to play with. Never allow your pup to “”win”” tug games with this toy. This toy disappears when YOU are finished playing with it. This toy is hidden from your pups sight whenever you are finished playing with it. After about a week of keeping this toy hidden from your pup, and only bringing it out when YOU are engaging your puppy in play, you can THEN begin to use it to redirect your pups attention when she nips.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

If your puppy is teething, try freezing a rubber toy; the cold rubber will soothe their gums. As always, supervise your puppy so they don`t chew and swallow any pieces. Make items unpleasant to your dog. Furniture and other items can be coated with a taste deterrent (such as Bitter Apple®) to make them unappealing.
Mouthing and play biting is a common phase for most pups and I often reassure owners that their pet will almost always grow out of it when they`re around three to five months old. Biting is also part of the natural teething process – this normally lasts until your pup is around seven months of age.
How long do puppies teethe? By the time your pup reaches 6 to 7 months old, they should have all 42 of their adult teeth and they should have passed the teething phase. However, both of you will endure 4 to 5 months of intense teething.
It`s normal for puppies and dogs to chew on objects as they explore the world. Chewing accomplishes a number of things for a dog. For young dogs, it`s a way to relieve pain that might be caused by incoming teeth. For older dogs, it`s nature`s way of keeping jaws strong and teeth clean.
When you do catch your dog chewing, stop it with a verbal command or a loud noise. When your dog stops, provide a chew toy. When your dog starts chewing on the toy, provide praise and positive reinforcement. Chew toy choices vary.
Puppy discipline uses a combination of redirection, basic commands that reprimand in a firm but calm tone of voice, supervision, and positive reinforcement. Positive reinforcement: When puppies exhibit good behavior or correct bad behavior, reward them with verbal praise, petting, treats, or playtime.
For the Lip Roll technique, you roll their lip onto their teeth and press down slightly as they bite, until they pull away. Alternatively, for the Jaw Pinch technique, you press your thumb down on top of their tongue and pinch down against your forefinger on the underside of the jaw again until they pull away.
Not only will the cool cloth numb your pup`s gums, but it will also provide a softer chewing texture compared to some toys. Your puppy will be able to sink his teeth into the cloth. Be very careful when using ice cubes to relieve teething pain. Never allow your pup to chew directly on ice cubes.
Teething is almost certainly uncomfortable for your puppy. Puppies have increased salivation, loss of appetite and irritability when their teeth erupt.
Do Puppies Get Aggressive During Teething? Some people may confuse some growling, biting, or tugging as aggressive behavior in a puppy. The truth is that the puppy is probably showing excitement at playing or trying to relieve dental pain.
Owners report destructive chewing when the dog is anywhere between six and ten months of age. Different breeds and sizes of dogs hit this stage of development at different times. Severity of damage depends on the individual dog`s level of pain tolerance.
Teething

Teething is a natural part of your puppy`s developmental stage. Their instincts tell them that the best way to relieve the pain is to chew. Sure they have toys to chew on, but they are less interactive than your fingers and won`t get your attention the same way.

Puppy Teething

Adult teeth start to come in around 12-16 weeks of age, and during this time, you may see an increase in chewing on objects or on you. Your puppy`s gums may be a bit sore as they lose puppy teeth and adult teeth come in.

Young puppies have not yet learned to regulate their emotional arousal. When then become overly excited or aroused, they start to lose inhibition and self-control, which leads to them getting extra bitey.
Here are some behaviors to avoid when your puppy starts biting: Don`t hold your puppy`s mouth closed when they nip at you. This method can send the wrong message to some developing pups.
For a dog who is acting out of fear or frustration (for example, a dog who is barking and lunging on leash), using the word `no` to stop the behavior without helping to alleviate their fear or frustration will often lead to an escalation in behavior, such as growling, air snapping, or biting.
Excessive chewing – your puppy will likely chew on anything and everything as they try to soothe their gums. Drooling (increased salivation) – the increased saliva can help lubricate the gums and make it easier for the puppy to chew. Irritability – your pup may be grumpy and fussy due to the pain of teething.
Carrots also have another benefit when they are fed to puppies. They make great teething aids! Cut them into tiny chunks so they are not a choking hazard and pop them in the freezer for a few hours. Your puppy will appreciate the soothing effect frozen carrot chunks can have on their sore gums and teeth.
Yes, dogs can eat bananas. In moderation, bananas are a great low-calorie treat for dogs. They`re high in potassium, vitamins, biotin, fiber, and copper. They are low in cholesterol and sodium, but because of their high sugar content, bananas should be given as a treat, not part of your dog`s main diet.
The puppy biting seemed to be getting a little better. But now it`s getting worse again! Most likely your puppy is teething. The baby teeth are getting ready to fall out and the adult teeth are starting to come in.
Stage 5: Adolescence (6 – 18 months) This can be the most difficult time during a puppy`s development – adolescence. Your cute little puppy is becoming a teenager and will start producing hormones which may result in changes in behaviour.
Undesirable behaviours such as barking, chewing, counter surfing, house-soiling and jumping up commonly begin to occur at around 3-6 months of age. Your puppy will not grow out of these behaviours. On the contrary, it is more likely that these behaviours will worsen if not addressed early on.
Squirting your dog with a water bottle may stop the behavior temporarily. However, this punishment teaches your dog to practice the undesired behavior when you and the water bottle are not present. Think about it this way: When you receive a speeding ticket, it`s effective punishment, but only temporarily.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. How do I get my dog to stop chewing on things? I kennel her when I leave for a few hours, but I can’t go to the mailbox without her eating something.
ANSWER : A. If she’s young, then this is just normal puppy behavior. Don’t worry about it. The thing about puppies is, they explore using their mouths. If your puppy grabs a coat hanger, or a slipper, you should roll up a newspaper, and smack yourself on the head with it for leaving those things out.. your puppy is going to explore things, that’s normal! It is 100% up to YOU to keep those things away from your puppy when your puppy is unsupervised… even for just a moment.

Remember to never scold your puppy for grabbing these things. They are just curious little cuties, and they don’t chew things up to bother us.. Dogs do not have intentional thought, so they aren’t ever doing anything ON PURPOSE to us.. The most important thing you can do when your puppy is chewing something you don’t want her to be chewing is TRADE her the inappropriate item with a toy of hers, so she understands “no honey, that isn’t what puppies chew on… THIS is what puppies chew on!” and then begin playing with her using her toy to show her that TOYS ARE FUN.. Way more fun than a boring ol’ coat hanger.

Another helpful thing you can do is have two bags of toys. In each bag is many different kinds of toys. Lots of chew toys, lots of soft squeaky toys, lots of rope-type toys, a bunch of balls.. All kinds of things! For one week you have bag#1’s toys out for your puppy to play with.. At the end of the one week, you collect those toys, and you bring out bag#2! The toys will be more interesting/feel like new to your puppy, which will in-turn, make her chew less inappropriate things. Her toys are too fun to care about that dumb Wii-mote that you left laying around.

Hope this helps!

Q. My puppy is urinating a lot. And the lady I gave one of the puppies to said she thinks her puppy has diabetes could my puppy have it to
ANSWER : A. It is not likely that either one of these puppies has diabetes. It is very uncommon for a puppy that young to have diabetes. If your puppy is straining to urinate or is urinating very small amounts frequently and cannot seem to wait for very long between urination, he may have a urinary tract infection. It is quite possible that your puppy is completely normal. I would suggest an exam with your veterinarian and discuss the behavior with them. They may suggest a urinalysis. Your puppy should be going to the vet at 3 week intervals for vaccinations at this age, so you can discuss it when he has his next set of vaccines. The other person with the other puppy should also be taking hers to a vet for proper immunizations and she should also discuss her concerns with her vet.

Q. How do I tech my puppy to tell me when he needs to go outside to go potty?
ANSWER : A. I would suggest that you have a one on one consultation with a Petcoach consultant such as myself and I would suggest that you sign your puppy up for a puppy class. Puppy class Dog trainers help teach their students everything and anything concerning puppy care and training. They can help you with potty training, biting, chewing, toys, care, commands, ect. Also you will be able to socialize your puppy with other puppies at a young age which you NEED to do! If you have a dog that was never socialized with other dogs it will become fearful and even aggressive and bite other dogs later in life.

Q. My puppy is 15 weeks old and is biting me. I can’t seem to stop her. What should I do?
ANSWER : A. Biting and nibbling is very common in puppies, as like infants, they tend to explore their environment with their mouths. As a puppy hits about 5-7 months of age, her adult teeth will also begin to come in, making his need to chew even higher! Providing plenty of distracting chews as well as teaching some bite inhibition can help to save your fingers! Chew toys such as thick canvas toys, toys that can be cooled in the fridge to soothe sore gums and toys that treats can be hidden in make for a great chew experience. If your fingers and hands are the target, letting out a loud “YELP!” and walking away can also teach your puppy that you do not enjoy her nibble sessions. Another way to teach bite control is through “air-planing” treats which involves slowly moving the treat down to your dog’s nose. If she jumps or gets too excited, remove the treat and start again. If she stays calm and doesn’t lunge, award her the treat. This can help teach her patience and control when playing with people!

Q. 2 month old Bulldog. While playing gets TOO rough:gripping hand REALLY tight/growling/shaking to the point of drawing blood. Aggresive?Normal?HELP!!
ANSWER : A. For the most part, this sounds pretty normal to me. English Bulldogs can be like this. What you can do is teach him bite inhibition. He needs to know that biting gets him nothing. Each and every time he nips, even gently, you immediately yelp like a puppy would, stand up, cross your arms, and ignore your puppy. Once he is ignoring you, go back to calmly playing with him WITH A TOY. Remember to always use a toy when playing with/petting/interacting with puppies. They will be teething very soon, and they don’t understand that biting you is inappropriate, so using a toy to redirect their attention is important. He needs SOMETHING to bite, or else he will choose your hand. Give him more options.

Another thing you can do is have a toy that YOU OWN. This can be a soft braided rope toy or something of the like. Dot not allow your dog to have this toy whenever he wants. This toy disappears when you are done playing with him with it, and reappears when you want to play. Never allow him to “win” games with this toy. Eventually, the toy will hold so much meaning, when he sees it, he will be instantly interested in the toy instead of your hands.

It also helps to have two bags of toys. Bag#1 is full of chew toys/rope toys/soft toys/etc. It comes out for one week, and then disappears and out comes Bag#2. Bag#2 has the same types of toys in it. This will keep the toys feeling like “new” to your pup and make him less likely to chew on you during play!

Q. What solid food should I start 4 week old Pit Bull puppies on?
ANSWER : A. A puppy food designed for large breed puppies can help with rapidly growing bones and joints and can be given in a wet form easily to puppies learning to eat solids. You can also provide a dry kibble for them to try and should moisten it with water or some formula to make it easier for the puppies to eat and digest. As the puppies grow and their teeth come in, they will begin to eat and explore more of the solid food on their own.

Mom should also be on a Puppy formula while nursing her puppies as it will provide extra nutrients to both her and babies while they are in a very rapid stage of growth!

Q. How can I stop my 9 week old puppy from biting?
ANSWER : A. This is common behavior in a young teething pup trying to learn more about their surroundings. You can help teach the puppy by providing plenty of safe chew toys and treats such as Nylabone and bully sticks. Only greet the puppy while calm and walk away if pup keeps biting. When puppy bites just freeze and offer a toy to redirect puppy to instead. Also ensure pup is getting plenty of exercise. Feeding meals out of a kong is a good way to provide mental stimulation which is also a form of exercise.

Q. How do I get my 10 wk old puppy to stop biting? He only bites me and my fiancé but licks everyone else. Tried bitter bite spray but he just barks.
ANSWER : A. When greeting your puppy, you should present an appropriate alternative for him to chew on. This can come in the form of toys. It’s normal for this age for puppies to be bitey. When you greet him, immediately offer a toy for him to chew on and calmly pet him. If he bites you instead, there are a few things you can try. You can yelp loudly startling him just as a sibling would do. You can freeze not jerking your hand away since that can likely become a game to him and you can also keep him secured in a play yard where if he bites, you can simply remove yourself from him so he learns all a attention goes away when he bites. Only give attention when he is calm.

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