Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Those bulbs are not used to heat the water!! You should place it in a spot where the turtle can “bask” in it. They are designed to provide lighting and heat in a specific spot for when they are out of the water. They are used as a substitute for the sun as most household lights do not give off any uva/uvb rays and turtles need those types of rays. Setting the tank next to a window will also not help as most windows filter those rays. If your turtles are indoors they need this lighting. Do not use the petstores for advice unless you find a reptile specialty petstore. Most employees are the big chains are just there for a paycheck and will tell you/sell you whatever you will buy. Reptile stores want what is best for your turtle. You could also seek out a veterinarian that specializes in exotics and they are more likely to help you and many will test your bulb for free and have them in stock.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Most fluorescent terrarium bulbs provide needed UVB (and UVA) but do not provide enough heat for basking. There are only a few exceptions. Mercury vapor bulbs and metal halide UVB lamps can emit both basking heat and UVB, but some produce heat or UVB that`s too intense, making them unsafe for your reptile buddy.
They need light that approximates normal sunlight, UVA (Ultraviolet A) light, and UVB (Ultraviolet B) light. They also need warmth like the sun would provide if they were living in the wild. In nature, aquatic turtles spend a good part of every day basking in the sunlight.
Turtles need UVA and UVB light to stay healthy. There are mixed views on the importance of UVA light. Some people believe it`s not as important as UVB light, but it`s known to help with breeding and activity levels. Alongside this, turtles living in the wild would be exposed to UVA rays every day.
Getting enough UV-B light is also critical for a turtle`s health. Turtles need UVB light to maintain an optimal level of vitamin D3 production. Without it, they will be unable to process and use calcium in their bodies.
Both bulbs emit heat and white light, the difference is a subtle one in the color of light that your animals are displayed under. ZooMed Basking Bulbs emit a very yellowish hued light, but are one of the most preferred methods for heating animals that have requirements for high basking temperatures.
A turtle can go a couple weeks without basking. However, after a month or so, their health will almost certainly deteriorate. A turtle can even suffer health repercussions if they go a couple days without basking.
UVA light helps regulate behaviors such as feeding, diurnal movement, mating and similar activities. UVB light allows the synthesis of vitamin D3, which helps to absorb calcium. UVC light is not required for reptiles, but it can help kill bacteria.
The amount of UVB your turtle needs will depend on its natural habitat. Most turtles will require 10.0 (or 10%) UVB, especially turtles who live in desert conditions. However, aquatic turtles or turtle species that come from swampy areas need less UVB, around 5% or a 5.0 bulb.
UVA rays, while slightly less intense than UVB, penetrate your skin more deeply. Exposure causes genetic damage to cells on the innermost part of your top layer of skin, where most skin cancers occur.
UVB is certainly necessary for turtles, as they can`t process calcium (via vitamin D) without it. This leads to metabolic bone disease and soft shell, among other issues. That said, your turtle should be fine for a few weeks until the new one comes in. Heat is a bigger issue.
AVOID TOUCHING THE UV LAMP GLASS WITH YOUR BARE HANDS. Oils on your hands can cause hot spots on the UV lamp and shorten its life. Use a soft clean cotton cloth or clean cotton gloves to handle the UV lamp.
UV lights do indeed get hot when they are turned on. But, they aren`t as hot as an incandescent bulb can get. An average UV light will reach about 50 degrees Celsius (122 degrees Fahrenheit). This temperature isn`t dangerous to humans.
The difference between UVB and UVA is made by the difference in wavelengths and the energy in the photons of the light. UVA also has a longer wavelength than UVB does. Both of these wavelengths, however, are Ultraviolet, hence the UV.
Different Types of Bulbs

Light bulbs provide UVA/UVB (typically fluorescent bulbs), while heat bulbs change the ambient temperature for basking or nighttime heat (typically incandescent or mini halogen bulbs).

When turtles are cold stunned, usually when water temperatures reach 50 degrees and below, they will experience a decrease in heart rate and circulation causing them to become lethargic. Cold stunning may lead to shock, pneumonia, frostbite, and potentially death, as they are not able to migrate to warmer waters.
Cold-stunned turtles become lethargic and are eventually unable to swim causing them to float at the surface. Wind and/or tides may wash them ashore. If temperatures remain low or turtles are not rescued, they can develop secondary health problems or die.
Turtles generally sleep for about 4 to 7 hours each night. They might also sleep during the day, or go to sleep for long periods of time if they`re hibernating. They may also rest in their basking area for long hours. Even when they sleep expect them to wake up frequently to breathe.
However, because they are captive animals, they do not have the opportunity to do this in an aquarium. For this reason, keeping turtles in an aquarium requires providing them with external sources of warmth. Heat lamps help provide turtles with the heat they need, especially when they are in early stages of life.
Do not use tap water for your tank, as tap water contains chlorine and possibly fluoride which can upset the pH balance of your system. De-chlorinated water needs to be used for the swimming area and filtered water for your turtle to drink.
If the water is too cold, they will get sick. But if the water is too warm, can also make them sick. Your turtle needs the water temperature suitable to be right in order to survive and be healthy. Like all reptiles, turtles are ectothermic or “cold-blooded” animals.
Turtles like to sunbathe (scientifically known as basking) to regulate their internal body temperature. Unlike mammals, reptiles are cold-blooded. As such, their body temperature is determined by the temperature of the surrounding environment.
UVB rays, the primary sunburn ray, are largely blocked by glass; but more than 50 percent of UVA rays, the main cause of premature skin aging, can penetrate glass.
The FWC suggests instead to use red or amber LED lights, since they give off a longer-wavelength light, which does not interfere with the turtles` mating, nesting and migration habits.
Smaller or juvenile turtles will eat heartily every day. As they get older, adult turtles may be offered a good-sized portion of food every two or three days.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My turtle has a uva / uvb blubs but is that enough to heat up the water for her?
ANSWER : A. Those bulbs are not used to heat the water!! You should place it in a spot where the turtle can “bask” in it. They are designed to provide lighting and heat in a specific spot for when they are out of the water. They are used as a substitute for the sun as most household lights do not give off any uva/uvb rays and turtles need those types of rays. Setting the tank next to a window will also not help as most windows filter those rays. If your turtles are indoors they need this lighting. Do not use the petstores for advice unless you find a reptile specialty petstore. Most employees are the big chains are just there for a paycheck and will tell you/sell you whatever you will buy. Reptile stores want what is best for your turtle. You could also seek out a veterinarian that specializes in exotics and they are more likely to help you and many will test your bulb for free and have them in stock.

Q. My dog drinks a lot of water, should I worry?
ANSWER : A. Firstly, you should quantify if your dog is actually drinking an excessive amount of water. In a 24 hour period, a dog should drink about 1 fluid ounce (or 30mL) per pound of body weight. Therefore, the recommended amount of water intake (in fluid ounces) equals your dog’s weight (in pounds). For example, if your dog weighs 8 pounds, he/she should drink about a cup of water in a 1 hour period. This will be slightly increased if your dog gets a lot of physical activity or lives outdoors.

You can measure your dog’s water intake the following way: in the morning, measure a specific amount, a little bit more than you think he/she will drink. 24 hours later, measure the remaining amount. If the amount of water your dog drank is significantly greater than it should be, then you should take your dog to a veterinarian.

Causes for mildly increased water consumption include: food changes, increased ambient and body temperature, increased activity, urinary tract infection, and general illness.

Common causes for greatly increased water consumption include: diabetes, urinary tract infection, kidney disease, steroid use, and other systemic diseases. With large increases in water consumption, you will also usually see increased urination. Please take note of urinary patterns to discuss with your vet. Greatly increased drinking and urination is ALWAYS a reason to see a vet.

Q. How important is water to cats?
ANSWER : A. Water is very important to cats. Dehydration puts cats at risk for many health problems, including urinary tract disorders. Cats get some of their water from their food, but they should always have access to fresh, clean water. Some cats seem to prefer to drink from a running source of water instead of a bowl. Rather than leaving a faucet on, look into purchasing a kitty “water fountain”.

Q. My 4 year long haired cat has fluid in lungs has water tablets, refusing wet food sleeping most. Any further I can do?
ANSWER : A. You need to take her back to the vet, the medications might not be enough. has she been diagnose with heart failure or heartworm or only water in the lungs? water in the lungs is cause by some other primary condition like cancer, heart failure or a severe infection – these needs to be treated as well together with the water in the lungs. treating the water in the lungs only is not going to solve the problem.

Q. My dog throws up after drinking water, what should I do?
ANSWER : A. If this only happens occasionally (a few times per week or month), and your dog throws up just water, it is not usually an emergency. Consider your dog’s activity before the event – physical activity, stress, elevated temperature, drinking too fast, and inhaling water can cause them to vomit water. Try elevating the bowl, giving him/her small amounts of water at once and waiting a few minutes after the activity.

Even if this has only happened once, if your dog is acting strange afterwards (low level of activity, not eating, etc.) you should visit your veterinarian immediately. Vomiting can be a sign of an obstruction, heat stroke, or a multitude of other causes.

If this happens frequently and you cannot figure out the cause, your dog should also be examined by a veterinarian. Chronic daily vomiting can be a sign of many problems, including a chronic obstruction, other gastrointestinal disease, or a systemic disease.

Q. Can I give my dog ice water to drink?
ANSWER : A. Yes, of course you can. However, you do not want to give ice water to your dog when he is already overheating. If your dog is panting, shallow breaths, vomiting, displaying gums of a different color, having diarrhea, or lethargic, do not give him ice water. Ice, ice water, and very cold water all shock your dogs system, and constrict the blood vessels, making your dog hotter in-turn. It could turn deadly.

If your dog is acting normal, and in a cool room, feel free to give him some ice water, or ice cubes! There a fun treat, and you have nothing to worry about. It’s truly only when they’re very hot, or overheating.

FYI, if the dogs are vomiting, panting with shallow breaths, having diarrhea, etc.. please see a vet immediately.

Q. Does Ice water really cause bloating in dogs due to muscle spasms? ?
ANSWER : A. No, that is false. The thing to worry about with ice and ice water is the constriction of the vessels. When your dog is hot/overheating/panting excessively/drooling/vomiting/having diarrhea/lethargy/gum discoloration/etc you should avoid giving them ice or ice water because of the constriction of the dogs blood vessels, which will cause the dog to heat up MORE internally. Instead, if your dog is panting excessively/drooling/obviously overheating, you should give them cool water, splash cool water onto their undersides, and place them in a cool dark room. If they are vomiting/having diarrhea/lethargic/and you notice their gums are discolored, seek veterinary help immediately!

Q. My frenchie puppy has a rash in her ears and one of her eyes is red
ANSWER : A. Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.