udly??

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. This is natural play behaviour no different to children playing. It’s not possible or fair to teach them to play quieter as they aren’t doing anything wrong. If you don’t like them playing tug of war games in the house only allow them to have the rope toy in the garden.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Ideally, interrupt his play before he gets too excited. Stop the game, put a leash on him, ask him to lie down, and give him something to chew on. Or, if he`s already too excited, walk him on the leash and ask him to do some obedience exercises until he calms down.
Provide exercise. Exercise your new puppy… lots. Burn off as much of his playful energy as possible with walks and outdoor or indoor play so he does not irritate your older dog with demands for play and roughhousing.
YOU are the ultimate leader, not the older dog and you must ensure the puppy does not harass the older dog. Usually a puppy can out play an adult, but this goes both ways. If the puppy walks away because it no longer wants to play the older dog needs to be told GAME OVER.
You need to slowly approach and consistently praise him and be there every time he meets a new dog. Then throw in a neutral toy and encourage them to play. If either dog shows any signs of aggression, pull your dog away and wait until next time. You need to ensure positive, friendly play at all times.
Avoid physical contact with your dog or cat during playtime to discourage dominant behavior. Treats can be a great motivator to stop playful aggression, much like with any other form of training. If your dog starts getting rough, practice a command to get her to calm down. If she obeys, give her a treat.
Bottom Line: When your dog growls at you I recommend that you listen to what your dog is saying. Immediately stop doing whatever it is that you`re doing and move away.
Teach the Younger Dog Respect

The poor old dog! Let your old dog growl and teach the young dog as long as it doesn`t get out of hand. If the young dog is rude and the old dog growls, barks, chases the young dog, and pins him to the ground, that`s fine. Let him teach the young dog some rules.

Pet and give positive reinforcement (treats, praise) when your older dog is calm. Move the puppy closer as the older dog can handle it without becoming stressed. Keep giving high-value treats to the older dog so that he`s associated great things with the puppy.
And, here are some signs that the play has become too rough:

Snapping and/or snarling. Showing teeth in a wide “smile” Lunging suddenly at the other dog.

While many dogs will welcome a new puppy with open paws, others may growl, snap and try to get away from the puppy from the onset. However, it is very rare for an adult dog to hurt a puppy.
It can take months before your new dog and resident dog mellow into true comfort with one another, so have patience with them as they get used to siblinghood. Always acknowledge positive interactions between your dogs and enjoy watching the lifelong friendship bloom.
Avoid punishing your dog if they act out, as they will associate any negativity with the other dog`s presence. Instead simply cease praising them and ignore them. Over time you will be able to build up your dog`s tolerance with less familiar dogs.
In many cases when a puppy is playing, they might simply not be cognizant of their own strength, or their ability to hurt others. When this happens, it can be shockingly easy for an otherwise harmless puppy to accidentally do some real damage.
While yelling at your puppy for biting is not advisable, it is okay to use a simple, firm signal such as “No!” when they make a mistake. If your puppy gets nippy while playing, stand up, take your hands away and say “No!” Once they`re sitting calmly, reward them with a treat and go back interacting/playing with them.
In one posture, hold the pup over your head, firmly supporting him with both hands and stare into his eyes (staring is a dominant behavior to the dog). Maintain this position until the pup has been still for 10 seconds. He must be still for that length of time or he hasn`t submitted to you.
Growling is part of normal canine communication. People usually think of a dog`s growl as a warning or as a sign of defense. Often, growling means that the dog needs space or is uncomfortable. However, growling is a complex vocalization that also occurs in other situations.
Don`t push your dog over his tolerance threshold. Whatever you`re doing, just stop. If your dog`s growl threshold is near his bite threshold – that is, if there`s not much time between his growl and his bite, get safe. If his growl doesn`t mean a bite is imminent, stop what you`re doing but stay where you are.
Snarling – often ignored by humans, tiny muzzle movements associated with a lip snarl may be an indicator of an uncomfortable dog. Dogs will often lift their lip in a snarl before they growl or snap. Growling – Sometimes dogs will growl during play, but these growls are accompanied with loose, relaxed body language.
Best case scenario if you growl at your dog — you`ll get his attention because you`ve made a novel noise. Worst case scenario – you`ll get bitten in the face. I used another example to illustrate the fact that growling at your dog is not only silly, but dangerous advice.
The short answer is: no. It is not OK to punish your puppy. The most important thing during a puppy`s first months of life is to teach him that you are his friend and protector and that you are reliable, predictable and fun. Your puppy most likely has no idea what you are punishing him for if you discipline him.
Most mother dogs will primarily discipline their puppies by moving away or using a simple snarl or growl. A deep guttural growl or sharp bark quickly informs the puppy that the interaction is not appreciated and to stop whatever he is doing or even thinking of doing.
If you`re anything like us, you`ll probably continue referring to your dog as a puppy until they`re old and grey! But generally speaking, a puppy is officially considered an adult dog between the ages of 1 – 2 years, once their bones have fully developed and they`ve reached their final height and size.
That means your dog is healthy and enjoying life. Nothing is slowing her down so she`s active, like a puppy.
It`s a common misconception that you can`t teach an old dog new tricks. Modern dog training methods are suitable for canine companions at any stage of their life. From a few weeks old, through puppyhood, adolescence, adulthood and right into their dotage, dogs love to learn.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. How do I get my dog to stop chewing on things? I kennel her when I leave for a few hours, but I can’t go to the mailbox without her eating something.
ANSWER : A. If she’s young, then this is just normal puppy behavior. Don’t worry about it. The thing about puppies is, they explore using their mouths. If your puppy grabs a coat hanger, or a slipper, you should roll up a newspaper, and smack yourself on the head with it for leaving those things out.. your puppy is going to explore things, that’s normal! It is 100% up to YOU to keep those things away from your puppy when your puppy is unsupervised… even for just a moment.

Remember to never scold your puppy for grabbing these things. They are just curious little cuties, and they don’t chew things up to bother us.. Dogs do not have intentional thought, so they aren’t ever doing anything ON PURPOSE to us.. The most important thing you can do when your puppy is chewing something you don’t want her to be chewing is TRADE her the inappropriate item with a toy of hers, so she understands “no honey, that isn’t what puppies chew on… THIS is what puppies chew on!” and then begin playing with her using her toy to show her that TOYS ARE FUN.. Way more fun than a boring ol’ coat hanger.

Another helpful thing you can do is have two bags of toys. In each bag is many different kinds of toys. Lots of chew toys, lots of soft squeaky toys, lots of rope-type toys, a bunch of balls.. All kinds of things! For one week you have bag#1’s toys out for your puppy to play with.. At the end of the one week, you collect those toys, and you bring out bag#2! The toys will be more interesting/feel like new to your puppy, which will in-turn, make her chew less inappropriate things. Her toys are too fun to care about that dumb Wii-mote that you left laying around.

Hope this helps!

Q. How do I desensitize my dog to squirrels and stray cats in the neighborhood?
ANSWER : A. It depends on the goal that you have in mind. I am going to assume that you would prefer that your dog not chase squirrels or stray cats in the yard/street. In this case, your options include: (1) training your dog on a “Leave it ” cue using positive reinforcement methods, (2) training your dog not to pull on its leash when it sees a squirrel/stray cat, and (3) training your dog to perform a more desirable behavior when it sees a squirrel/cat.
Training your dog on a cued “leave it” command is useful because it will give you the ability to tell your dog to stay away from any number of undesirable objects on your command. Training your dog to perform a more desireable behavior when it sees a squirrel or cat will substitute a behavior you find acceptable (sitting, laying down, coming to the door, etc.) with a behavior you dislike. Your dog can still react, just in a positive way. If your dog pulls on the leash every time you see a squirrel/cat, training not to pull will make your walk safer and more pleasant.
The ideal training method to use with dogs, or any animal for that matter, is positive reinforcement training, particularly a method called “clicker- training.” The basic concept of positive reinforcement training is to pair a reward (reinforcement) with a behavior you want to increase in frequency. In other words, when your dog performs the behavior you desire, it receives an award, which reinforces the desired behavior so you get more of that behavior. There are many excellent books in stores or on-line that describe positive reinforcement training in detail and many give step-by-step instructions for training common commands like “leave it”. Look for books that specifically mention positive reinforcement training or clicker-training. You can also take dog training classes to learn the techniques, find a mentor who already uses clicker-training, or request a consult from one of the pet experts on this site to guide you.

Q. 2 month old Bulldog. While playing gets TOO rough:gripping hand REALLY tight/growling/shaking to the point of drawing blood. Aggresive?Normal?HELP!!
ANSWER : A. For the most part, this sounds pretty normal to me. English Bulldogs can be like this. What you can do is teach him bite inhibition. He needs to know that biting gets him nothing. Each and every time he nips, even gently, you immediately yelp like a puppy would, stand up, cross your arms, and ignore your puppy. Once he is ignoring you, go back to calmly playing with him WITH A TOY. Remember to always use a toy when playing with/petting/interacting with puppies. They will be teething very soon, and they don’t understand that biting you is inappropriate, so using a toy to redirect their attention is important. He needs SOMETHING to bite, or else he will choose your hand. Give him more options.

Another thing you can do is have a toy that YOU OWN. This can be a soft braided rope toy or something of the like. Dot not allow your dog to have this toy whenever he wants. This toy disappears when you are done playing with him with it, and reappears when you want to play. Never allow him to “win” games with this toy. Eventually, the toy will hold so much meaning, when he sees it, he will be instantly interested in the toy instead of your hands.

It also helps to have two bags of toys. Bag#1 is full of chew toys/rope toys/soft toys/etc. It comes out for one week, and then disappears and out comes Bag#2. Bag#2 has the same types of toys in it. This will keep the toys feeling like “new” to your pup and make him less likely to chew on you during play!

Q. My 3 month puppy eats his own poop and is also biting what can I do to prevent this
ANSWER : A. When it comes to poop eating, you want to consider a few things. First off, what is his diet like? Maybe something is lacking in his diet that is causing him to want to eat his own poop. This is the most common reason why dogs eat THEIR OWN poop. Try a higher quality kibble like Taste of the Wild, Ziwipeak, Orijen.. and try feeding three meals per day, instead of the more common two meals per day. Remember to gradually switch his kibble. Add a little bit of the new kibble and reduce the old kibble very slowly.. little by little every couple of days until the bowl is mostly new kibble! You should also be cleaning up his poops IMMEDIATELY after he does them.. I mean like, you have a bag in your hand, and you are low enough to scoop it up RIGHT when he finished so he doesn’t have a chance to eat his poop.

When it comes to nipping there are a few things you can do. First, you should yelp as soon as the teeth touch your skin, stand up, cross your arms, and ignore the puppy until he is ignoring you. Once he is off doing his own thing, swoop down and calmly reward him by playing with him WITH A TOY so he doesn’t nip your hands. Whenever you pet him, or interact with him, you should always have a toy on-hand so you can give it to him. This toy should be a soft braided rope toy that YOU own. This means, your puppy is never allowed to have this toy on the floor, and your pup can never “win” tug games with this toy. This is YOUR toy that disappears when you’re finished playing, and reappears when you want to play. If you keep this up, in a weeks time, your puppy will be so excited to see that toy, that as soon as you bring it out, he stops nipping you because he wants to play with the toy. Another thing you can do is have two bags of toys. Bag#1 is full of chew toys/soft toys/squeaky toys/etc. After one week, Bag#1 disappears and out comes Bag#2. Bag#2 has the same types of toys as Bag#1, and it only stays out for one week. This keeps the toys feeling like new to your pup!

Q. My two year old dog and five month old puppy play very loudly, growling, playing with a rope toy. How can I train then to play but not so loudly??
ANSWER : A. This is natural play behaviour no different to children playing. It’s not possible or fair to teach them to play quieter as they aren’t doing anything wrong. If you don’t like them playing tug of war games in the house only allow them to have the rope toy in the garden.

Q. Whenever I take my dog on walks he always barks at people and others dogs in my neighborhood. What should I do to resolve the problem
ANSWER : A. The very first thing to do is to make sure your dog is getting sufficient physical and mental exercise every day. A tired dog is a good, happy dog and one who is less likely to bark from boredom or frustration. Depending on his breed, age, and health, your dog may require several long walks as well as a good game of chasing the ball and playing with some interactive toys.

Figure out what he gets out of barking and remove it. Don’t give your dog the opportunity to continue the barking behavior.

Ignore your dog’s barking for as long as it takes him to stop. That means don’t give him attention at all while he’s barking. Your attention only rewards him for being noisy. Don’t talk to, don’t touch, or even look at him. When he finally quiets, even to take a breath, reward him with a treat. To be successful with this method, you must wait as long as it takes for him to stop barking. Yelling at him is the equivalent of barking with him.

Get your dog accustomed to whatever causes him to bark. Start with whatever makes him bark at a distance. It must be far enough away that he doesn’t bark when he sees it. Feed him lots of good treats. Move the stimulus a little closer (perhaps as little as a few inches or a few feet to start) and feed treats. If the stimulus moves out of sight, stop giving your dog treats. You want your dog to learn that the appearance of the stimulus leads to good things.

Teach your dog the ‘quiet’ command. Oddly, the first step is to teach your dog to bark on command. Give your dog the command to “speak,” wait for him to bark two or three times, and then stick a tasty treat in front of his nose. When he stops barking to sniff the treat, praise him and give him the treat. Repeat until he starts barking as soon as you say “speak.” Once your dog can reliably bark on command, teach him the “quiet” command. In a calm environment with no distractions, tell him to “speak.” When he starts barking, say “quiet” and stick a treat in front of his nose. Praise him for being quiet and give him the treat.

As in all training, always end training on a good note, even if it is just for obeying something very simple, like the ‘sit’ command. If you dog regresses in training, go back to the last thing he did successfully and reinforce that before moving on again. Keep sessions short, 15-20 minutes max, and do this several times a day.

Q. My three month puppy is teething and she’s biting everything. What can I do?
ANSWER : A. As you know, this is a normal issue to have with a 3 month old puppy. Be sure that you are never scolding your pup for biting/nipping/teething. This is so natural and normal for them, scolding gives very mixed messages. There are a few things you can do to help teach your pup that nipping on you is inappropriate without the use of scolding.

First off, you should have a toy that YOU own. This toy should be brand new. It should be something like a SOFT braided rope toy. Never allow your pup to play with this toy without you. Never leave this toy on the ground for your pup to play with. Never allow your pup to “”win”” tug games with this toy. This toy disappears when YOU are finished playing with it. This toy is hidden from your pups sight whenever you are finished playing with it. After about a week of keeping this toy hidden from your pup, and only bringing it out when YOU are engaging your puppy in play, you can THEN begin to use it to redirect your pups attention when she nips.

Q. My Beagle listens to me, but cries & whines when I’m gone & doesn’t listen to my parents. I adopted him just a couple days ago. Any tips for my folks?
ANSWER : A. I really highly doubt that your Beagle listens to you and has formed a connection with you in just a couple of days. It takes months to build up any kind of serious connection with your dog. You need to work on communication with your dog through training them to understand different cues. For instance the Leave-It cue: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R1TS5nA7z5Q

You have to work on bonding with your dog through mental stimulation. Training is very important. Luring each new behavior from scratch, and training using treats is how you form a strong bond with your new dog. No scolding is ever necessary… work on being calm, and positive, all the time.

If your dog is crying/whining when you leave, this may be separation anxiety. You’re going to have to separation train this dog from scratch. This dog needs to learn that separation can be a good thing! Tell your “folks” to NOT scold the dog when he is crying/whining after you leave, because that will make your dog MORE anxious when you leave next time. Your dog will be dwelling on the negative if your parents fuel your dogs negative feelings towards you leaving. FUN things should happen when you leave. Your parents should pull out the treats and start doing some basic obedience training with your dog. Your parents should stuff a Kong filled with awesome treats (peanut butter) and give it to him so he feels happy when you leave.

I have some excellent separation anxiety exercises you can work on. If you’d like, you can purchase a consultation with me, and I will go over how to separation train from scratch. It will make your dog comfortable being alone, guaranteed.

Read Full Q/A … : I Don't Like My Mother