Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Sounds possible that he had some irritation to the eye that is at least not itchy anymore. You can do either, having it checked now to confirm mild irritation, potentially due to debris or a topical irritant to the eye; or you can flush the eye with sterile saline eye wash (over the counter) using care not to poke or prod the eye and see if the irritation goes away on its own within the next 24 hrs. It has shown improvement already it appears, however if it is not cleared up and your pet seems irritated by it AT ALL, then it should be looked at by a vet and tested for a possible corneal scratch or ulcer. These can cause redness of the eye, eye discharge and pawing at the face. They are usually treated by prescription only topical eye antibiotic ointment and generally do very well after treatment.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

If you notice redness in one or both eyes of your pet, you should visit your veterinarian to obtain a proper diagnosis. The most common causes of red eye are conjunctivitis, allergies, or irritants, however more serious possibilities exist so it is important to have your pet examined.
One popular method is using a warm, damp cloth to gently clean and soothe the eye area. Another option is using a saline solution to flush out any irritants.
Once you know the cause, your vet can help you with a treatment plan. If it`s a bacterial infection, the treatment will be intense but it gets better in a few days. There are more serious problems if it`s a viral disease like distemper. For a fungal infection, the red eye will get better after the whole dog is treated.
The fact is that if your dog is experiencing any eye sensitivity, irritation, or pain it`s time to head to your vet. Your veterinarian will be able to conduct a thorough eye exam to determine the cause of your pup`s symptoms and provide effective treatment to help your dog`s eyes feel better.
It`s vital that you see a vet if you suspect your dog has conjunctivitis or other eye problems so they can diagnose the problem and start treatment. You should not wait for it to go away on its own or rely on home remedies. In many cases, your dog`s eye infection will not go away without treatment.
With appropriate treatment, bacterial conjunctivitis is usually fully resolved within 5 to 7 days. Viral conjunctivitis can take up to 3 to 4 weeks for full resolution. Allergic conjunctivitis will persist until the underlying allergen is discovered and eliminated.
The most likely causes of a painless red eye are minor problems such as conjunctivitis or a burst blood vessel. These conditions don`t tend to affect your vision and normally get better within a week or two.
“Cherry eye” is a common term for prolapse (or popping out) of the third eyelid gland. Many mammals, including dogs, have a third eyelid located inside the lower eyelid, also called the nictitating membrane. The third eyelid serves as an additional protective layer for the eye, especially during hunting or fighting.
Signs that a pet may be experiencing eye pain include: Squinting, blinking, or closing their eyes more than normal. Elevated third eyelids, which rise from the eye`s inner corner. Rubbing their eyes on furniture or carpet.
The fact is that if your pooch is experiencing any eye sensitivity, irritation, or pain it`s time to head to your vet. Only your veterinarian will be able to conduct a thorough eye exam to determine the cause of your pup`s symptoms.
The vast majority of corneal injuries are fairly minor and respond really well to simple treatment. This usually involves a short course of antibiotic eye drops and some painkillers for a week or so.
Some injuries may affect your dog`s ability to open its eye entirely. A bloodshot appearance in the white of the eye may indicate trauma or irritation. A yellow or greenish discharge can signal an infection, which may occur as a result of an injury.
Pinkeye in dogs is very similar to pinkeye in humans, and it may cause similar symptoms too. Some of the symptoms of pinkeye include pain, itching, swelling, and crust or drainage from the eye. Pinkeye can be easily treated with the help of medicated eye drops.
Depending on the cause, red eye can often be treated at home. Here are some tips. Regularly place a cool compress over the eyes, made by soaking clean cotton wool or cloth in warm or cold water and then squeezing it out. Avoid eye makeup, or choose hypoallergenic eye make up.
In addition, an eye infection can easily be spread to other pets in the home. Untreated eye problems can lead to significant vision loss or blindness if left untreated or if treatment is delayed. This is true even for easily-treated eye conditions such as pink eye.
Bloodshot Eyeballs and Swollen Eyelids

Dogs with pink eye typically develop physical symptoms such as a pinkish color to the eye and fluid discharging from the affected area. The eyeball may appear to be bloodshot, and the eyelid may become swollen, even to the point where the dog cannot open its eye.

Signs that a dog eye ulcer is healing include decreased redness and squinting, and the dog just seems more comfortable. Additional signs a dog eye ulcer is healing include: Third eyelid goes back down. Eye no longer looks white.
Natural treatment for eye infection

If you believe your dog or cat may have some eye irritation, try using a homemade saline solution made from 1/4 teaspoon of salt and 1 cup of lukewarm water. Drip the saline solution into your pet`s eye using a cotton ball or eye dropper 3 or 4 times a day.

A red eye is usually nothing to worry about and often gets better on its own. But sometimes it can be serious and you`ll need to get medical help.
Cool compress

A towel soaked in cool water and wrung out may also provide short-term relief for red eye symptoms. It can relieve any swelling and reduce any itchiness from irritation. Be sure to avoid any extremes of temperature in the area around your eyes, or you may make the problem worse.

An untreated “cherry eye” will have decreased tear production and possibly incomplete closure of the eye. This can cause eye infections and dry eye. The dry eye can be severe enough to cause a lot of pain, pigmentation of the eye and blindness. The treatment for a prolapsed nictitans gland is often surgical.
Spreading Conjunctivitis

Many people wonder if they can catch conjunctivitis from their dog? It may surprise you to learn that, while it`s very unlikely that you will catch conjunctivitis from your dog it is possible if the cause of your pup`s eye condition is a parasite such as roundworms.

The only safe human eye drops for dogs are saline eye drops and artificial tears. And, even then, you should discuss why you want to use them with your veterinarian before administering the drops. If you just need to flush out your dog`s eyes to remove a crusty discharge, warm tap water will do the trick.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. One eye is more red than the other. Last night he was pawing at it,today, he isn’t. Should I bring him to the vet?
ANSWER : A. Sounds possible that he had some irritation to the eye that is at least not itchy anymore. You can do either, having it checked now to confirm mild irritation, potentially due to debris or a topical irritant to the eye; or you can flush the eye with sterile saline eye wash (over the counter) using care not to poke or prod the eye and see if the irritation goes away on its own within the next 24 hrs. It has shown improvement already it appears, however if it is not cleared up and your pet seems irritated by it AT ALL, then it should be looked at by a vet and tested for a possible corneal scratch or ulcer. These can cause redness of the eye, eye discharge and pawing at the face. They are usually treated by prescription only topical eye antibiotic ointment and generally do very well after treatment.

Read Full Q/A … : Eye Problems in Cats

Q. Weak, discharge from eyes, swelling on right eye, does not want to open eyes. What is wrong?
ANSWER : A. If the discharge from the eye is green or yellow in color, it can indicate a secondary infection. Swollen eyes can be caused by a number of things ranging from allergies to infections, to injury to the eye itself or surrounding areas.

It is best to have your pet’s eye examined by your local vet. They will most likely wish to place a stain in the eye that can check for damage such as cuts or scratches. An ointment can then be given to help reduce inflammation, pain and take care of infection.

Until you can get to the vet, be sure to not let your pet scratch or paw at their eye as this can make things worse. You can also use a warm wet washcloth to gently remove any debris and allow the eye to open some, providing relief. However, if symptoms worsen, or the swelling travels to the face, head or neck, it may indicate a serious allergic reaction which should be treated immediately.

Q. I was told by my vet that my dogs cherry eye was caused by something hitting his eye when he was poking around under a bush. I was told surgery needed
ANSWER : A. Prolapsed gland of the eyelid refers to a pink mass protruding from the animal’s eyelid; it is also called a “cherry eye.” Normally, the gland is anchored by an attachment made up of fibrous material. The most common sign of “cherry eye” is an oval mass protruding from the dogs’s third eyelid. It can occur in one or both eyes, and may be accompanied by swelling and irritation. He may have acquired it by getting an injury to his eye but this isn’t the case sometimes. Sometimes there is a weakness in the fibrous attachment.

The veterinarian will review the mass in the dog’s third eyelid and determine if there is an underlying cause for the condition. The diagnosis of the prolapsed gland could be scrolled or everted cartilage in the third eyelid, abnormal cells in the third eye, or a prolapse of fat in the dog’s eye.

Treatment often includes surgical replacement of the gland in the dog’s eye, or removal of the entire gland if the condition is severe. Conversely, if medications are recommended, they are typically topical anti-inflammatory drugs that are effective in reducing swelling.

Q. Yes I have a Chiquita and her left eye was swollen and red then next it spread to the other eye. What should I do when all the vets are close?
ANSWER : A. If both eyes are swollen shut or you are seeing swelling of the face and neck in addition it may indicate a serious allergic reaction and you should seek care from an emergency vet immediately. It is also best to try and schedule an appointment with your regular vet when they reopen if the eyes are very red or bothered or if the redness spreads. You can use a warm washcloth to remove any debris from the eyes to make them more comfortable, however seeking veterinary care is best.

Q. Why does a dogs pads on his paws turn such a pink color?
ANSWER : A. I’m confused here. Are your dogs paw pads typically black, but they turn a reddish pink? You may want to see your veterinarian about this to make sure there isn’t anything wrong with his paw pads. I’ve met dogs who have extremely fragile paw pads due to some bad genetics.. they end up getting injured on their paws very easily. I’ve met dogs who are unable to even walk on cement without wearing little doggy booties. It could be that your dog is dealing with some serious discomfort, and you want to get that checked out immediately.

If your dogs paw pads just seem a little bit irritated, you may want to try something like “Musher’s Secret” on them. This is an ointment that you rub on your dogs paw pads to keep them healthy, and smooth. I use this in the winter when there is rock salt all over the ground.. it keeps her paw pads from getting irritated and tearing open. It’s like lotioning your skin to keep it from getting dry and cracked. If you think your dog is dealing with something that is a little more extreme than just some dry irritated paw pads, then see your vet immediately instead of purchasing the Musher’s Secret.

Read Full Q/A … : Discolored Pads in Dogs

Q. What can be given to dogs to stop the brown draining around dogs eyes? I was told tetracycline would work.
Thanks
ANSWER : A. Eye leakage is normal in some breeds of dogs, especially those that are more “bug-eyed” types. This eye leakage is just normal tears coming from the eye which can stain lighter colored coats. Unless there is an infection it does not need to be treated with antibiotics. Signs of infection usually include drainage that is thick or goopy and is yellow or greenish in color. Dogs with infections may also want to keep the eye closed, or may paw and scratch at it.

For plain tear-staining. Tear-stain wipes can be used around the eyes to remove the stain and bring the coat back to natural color. If infection is suspected, it is best to have your vet take a look at the eye prior to placing any medications in it.

Q. My dog got into a fight with a cat. I think the cat scratch her eye. I clean it out with water. I have gentak can I put that in there?
ANSWER : A. It is best NOT to place anything in the eye unless specifically instructed to do so by your vet as it can cause more damage to the eye. As cat scratches and bites can easily become infected and the eye is a very sensitive area, it is best to schedule a veterinary appointment as soon as possible to have the eye examined. Your vet can place a fluorescent stain in the eye to check the extent of the damage and can then give you a pet-safe medication to place in it as needed to help it heal. Until you can get to the vet, it is best to keep the eye clean of debris and discharge with a warm wet washcloth, and to prevent your dog from scratching or clawing at the eye with the use of an Elizabethan (cone) collar.

Q. My pet is suffering eyes discharge, what should I do?
ANSWER : A. Mucus, yellow-green pus, or a watery eye discharge can all be signs of conjunctivitis, which is inflammation of the lining of your dog’s eye.

There is a wide range of causes for conjunctivitis, from allergies, injury, birth defects, and tear duct problems, to foreign bodies, dry eye syndrome, infections or even tumors.

Other signs of conjunctivitis include excessive blinking or keeping the eye closed, squinting and pawing at the eyes.

Treatment of this condition depends on the underlying cause. In most of the cases cleaning, soothing the eye and applying antibiotics eye drops suffice but is some instances further investigation is required to establish the cause of the excessive eye discharge, and this should be performed by a veterinarian.