Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. No sinuses in cats are very small compared to humans and they hardly ever get infected. Your kitten is more likely to have upper airways infection – if he/she has green discharge from the nose or eyes, has breathing difficulties or is not eating you should take him/her to your vets to get treatment.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Severe cases of rhinosinusitis in kittens or adult cats may require intravenous fluids to prevent dehydration, and nutritional support via a feeding tube to maintain weight. The veterinarian may prescribe antibiotics if secondary bacterial rhinosinusitis is present or suspected.
It can result from a variety of conditions, including: an upper respiratory infection, a sinus infection (from dental disease or a nasal foreign body), a tumor in the nose, nasopharyngeal stenosis (a narrowing of the back of the throat) or a nasopharyngeal polyp.
Cat colds are typically not considered life-threatening, however, in some cases, symptoms may become severe and lead to a more dangerous secondary infection. It is especially important to closely monitor very young, or senior cats if they show signs of a cat cold.
A runny or stuffed-up nose is the most common clinical sign in cats with chronic upper respiratory infections. The nasal discharge tends to be thick and often yellow.
Symptoms of upper respiratory tract infections include clear or colored discharge from the eyes or nose, coughing, sneezing, swelling of the mucous membranes around the eyes (conjunctivitis, see Figure 2), ulcers in the mouth, lethargy, and anorexia. In rare cases, cats may have trouble breathing.
Most cat colds last about seven to ten days and are generally not serious. If your cat has been suffering with cold symptoms and shows no sign of improvement within 4 days, it may be time to visit the vet. Some upper respiratory diseases can be serious and may lead to pneumonia, if not closely monitored.
“Most cats with an uncomplicated upper respiratory infection can be treated symptomatically at home.” Cats with nasal or airway congestion may benefit from increased environmental humidification, such as being taken into a steamy bathroom for 10-15 minutes several times per day.
Feline Upper Respiratory Infection Treatment

The veterinarian will tell you what the best course of treatment is for your cat. This may include medications, isolation, rest, fluids from an IV, and nutritional support. Cats often get a bacterial infection on top of a viral infection, so yours may need antibiotics.

In most cases, cat colds are harmless and will go away within 1-2 weeks. You do need to monitor their health, however, and if there is no sign of improvement by the fourth day, you should make an appointment with your vet as a persisting cold that does not get treated properly may develop into pneumonia.
Can cats get a cold? Yes! Cat colds are upper respiratory infections characterized by all the same symptoms as the human cold. If your feline friend is sneezing or has a runny nose there`s a good chance they have a cat cold.
At home, you can try using a plain (non-medicated) saline nasal spray (available over the counter at any drugstore) if your cat tolerates it. It will help thin any “stuck” mucus and often stimulates sneezing, which helps expel mucus and bacteria. Tip the bottle upside down to drip 1-2 drops onto each nostril.
Most upper respiratory infections in cats will resolve themselves with a little extra TLC and time. However, more severe infections may require treatment, prescription pet medication or even hospitalization. As a rule of thumb, a sniffly kitty that is still eating, active and feeling fine can be watched for a few days.
In rare cases, URI can cause serious disease such as pneumonia. Also, sick cats may not eat or drink enough thus becoming severely dehydrated. In such cases, hospitalization and fluid supplementation may be needed.
If you observe your cat breathing or panting through their mouth continuously for more than a few minutes at a time, and it isn`t related to physical exertion, it can be a warning that they need medical attention. Breathing through their mouth can be a symptom of: Something stuck in their nose.
Treating Upper Respiratory Infections in Cats. Thankfully, many times URI cases have generally mild signs that will resolve on their own over time (much like if you caught the common cold). However, if your cat has colored eye or nasal discharge, your vet may prescribe antibiotics, either orally or in a topical eye.
Cat laryngitis is often the result of infectious diseases such as upper respiratory infections (cat cold or URI), calicivirus, or rhinotracheitis, however, there are also various other conditions that can make your cat lose their voice including: Hyperthyroidism. Blockage in the larynx.
Medical therapy for URIs may include liquid oral antibiotics such as Clavamox, probiotics, lysine powder and/or a topical antibiotic for the eyes. You can also provide nebulization to these kittens by allowing them in the bathroom while you run a hot bath or shower.
Feline upper respiratory infection is a common illness in cats. It`s similar to a cold, but it can be much more serious. It`s caused by different viruses or bacteria, and it targets the upper airway — the nose, throat, and sinuses — rather than the lungs.
Cats with colds may have symptoms including coughing, sneezing, discharge from the eyes or nose, lethargy, and sometimes fever. For many cats, these symptoms are will go away on their own in about 7-10 days. However, some cats may experience complications, such as a secondary bacterial infection or pneumonia.
Experts agree that outdoor temperatures under 32 degrees Fahrenheit (0 degrees Celsius) can pose a danger to cats if they do not have access to a suitable shelter. When temperatures drop below freezing, cats can be at risk for hypothermia and frostbite, both of which are life-threatening conditions.
Nasal sprays: Saline nasal spray and pediatric nasal sprays (Little Noses) can be given in kittens and cats to alleviate dryness and nasal congestion associated with a cold.
Olive Leaf Extract For Pets – A natural antiviral and antibacterial herbal remedy that has been used since ancient times to support a healthy immune system. It is helpful for cats with respiratory conditions including asthma, chronic upper respiratory infections (URIs), allergies, viruses and sinus infections.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. I have a cat with that virur (aids) could u tell me about her disposition and care
ANSWER : A. Thanks for your question.

Unfortunately the discussion about what you asked has no straightforward answers and can be quite complex.

First thing that I would double check, considering that your cat is very young, is whether she is really infected. It is important to remember that kittens born to FIV-infected queens will receive antibodies from the queen via the milk, and so will test positive early in life though they may not be infected. Kittens with a positive test result should always be retested when they are 5-6 months of age.

Many FIV infected cats are able to live happily with the virus for a long period of time, and indeed the virus will not necessarily ever cause clinical disease.

Different factors will influence the onset of disease in your cat including:

– The ”subtype” of FIV your cat is infected with,

– Her immune response

– The presence or absence of other infectious agents.

To maintain a good quality of life for your cat, I will give you these general guidelines, but you will then find certainly helpful to speak with your veterinarian for specific cases.

– Some antiviral medications used in human patients with HIV infection have also been shown to help some cats with FIV infection. Interferons may have anti-viral effects and modify immune responses. A recombinant feline interferon (feline interferon omega) is available in some countries. Down side is the cost usually.

– Keep your cat away from other cats and possible source of infections;

– Maintain good quality nutrition;

– Keep your cat indoor if possible regularly checked by your veterinarian;

– Keep your cat away from non-infected cats.

Q. My cats nose is stopped up on antibiotics. She has a loss of appetite, acting normal though. Is 3 ounces of can food enough in 24h? 9 pound cat
ANSWER : A. Cats with stopped up noses tend to eat much less, as you’ve noted, because they can’t smell their food as well. And the smell of food is pretty important to a cat’s appetite. You can start by warming up the food in a microwave – not too hot, test it yourself by putting your finger right in the center, as the temperature of microwave food can vary – as this will intensify the smell and hopefully make your cat more interested.

Saline nose drops, like those that are used on little kids, are safe to use on a cat to clean the discharge that is dried around and in the nose. There’s a brand called Little Noses that’s available in the U.S. That I like. You can put it on a q-tip and try to remove the debris. Humidifying the air with a humidifier can help as well, or you can put the cat in the bathroom and run the shower enough to generate steam. Don’t use “real” nose drops like Neo-synephrine or anything else like that – cats quickly build up resistance to them.

A 3 oz can of food is an OK amount in 24 hours, but do try the techniques above to help your cat get more interested in food. You might also try some baby food – no garlic or onions in the ingredients – as cats usually really like the taste of it.

Q. Our 14 week old kitten sounds like she has a stuffy nose. Do cats get sinus infections?
ANSWER : A. No sinuses in cats are very small compared to humans and they hardly ever get infected. Your kitten is more likely to have upper airways infection – if he/she has green discharge from the nose or eyes, has breathing difficulties or is not eating you should take him/her to your vets to get treatment.

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

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Q. i believe my cat is pregnant but showing signs of being in heat
ANSWER : A. Cats are induced ovulators, meaning they will continue to go into heat until they are bred, or spayed (reproductive organs removed). If your cat is showing signs of being in heat (excessive yowling, presenting her rear to you for inspection, attempting to get out or other cats hanging near your house) and you don’t want kittens, it is best to have her spayed. Most cats are also semi-seasonal in their heat cycle meaning they will more likely be in heat through Spring-Summer than in Fall-Winter.

Pregnancy in cats lasts about 60 days. Signs of pregnancy may include weight gain, increased appetite, nipples that become pronounced or “leak” and seeking nesting areas to deliver kittens. If you saw that your cat was in heat, or had her mated, you can use the date she was bred to determine when she may be due for kittens. Your local vet can help determine if she is indeed pregnant and can also take an X-ray to determine the number of kittens present if your cat is nearing her due date. Be sure to feed mom a kitten formula in the last few weeks of her pregnancy and during nursing as it will help provide extra beneficial nutrients for both mom and babies.

If you do not want kittens, some very early term pregnancies can be aborted with spaying, otherwise spaying mom is usually done when kittens are weaned from their mom.

Q. I have 6 cats, my 2 black, male, cats have small eruptions on the furry bridge area above & to the side of the nose. They dry and form crust scabs.
ANSWER : A. I do agree with the answer below that any time more than one animal in a household is affected with a skin condition we have to rule out contagious disease – even if not every animal in the house in infected. The changes you are describing to your cats’ noses definitely sound compatible with infectious diseases like ringworm and mites (mange). However, if your cats stay indoors and don’t have contact with cats outside of your other cats, and if none of your cats (not just the infected ones) came from a shelter recently it’s probably not something contagious.

I will add that I have seen non-affected cats that carry ringworm and pass it to other animals in the household, so if you have any new cats check for ringworm.

Once infectious causes have been ruled out you can think about strange things, like immune-mediated skin disease (lupus) and solar dermatitis. Diagnosing what exactly is causing the problem and how to treat it may require taking a biopsy from one or preferably both cats.

Q. My cat has a runny nose along with runny eyes. Should I worry?
ANSWER : A. Runny noses and eyes are common disorders in cats, and are usually a sign of an underlying condition. The most common one being an Upper Respiratory Infection.

This condition, also known as “cat flu”, is seen most often in kittens. It is caused by one of several viruses or bacteria and common symptoms include a runny nose, runny eyes, sneezing, wheezing and congestion.

In some cases, the discharge may change color to greenish or yellow, indicating a secondary infection. Cats that are in high stress environments or in contact with other cats are most likely to get URIs.

At home, be sure to keep your cat eating and drinking to prevent dehydration. You can also use a warm washcloth to remove any debris from the eyes or nose that is making seeing or breathing difficult.

Finally, keep in mind that if the symptoms continue for more than a day or two, the discharge becomes green or yellow, or your cat appears to be feverish or in distress, veterinary care should be sought without further delay.