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Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. If she has been vomiting that much it is impossible to keep her hydrated at home as she will be losing a lot more fluids and electrolytes than you can replace. You need to see your vet or emergency vet as soon as possible.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Vomiting and diarrhoea can have a wide range of causes including parasites, a viral infection, a bacterial infection, toxin ingestion, a gut obstruction, a new food allergy or sensitivity, pancreatitis etc.
The cause of an old dog throwing up has ranged from something simple, like the dog eating too many dog treats, to more complex issues, like liver or kidney disease. Senior dogs, like puppies, are not as resilient and may become significantly and more rapidly affected by vomiting compared with adult dogs.
Hello, some dogs will drink a lot of water and then vomit shortly after from just drinking too fast. She could also have GI issues and would need to see your vet for prescription nausea medication such as cerenia. For dogs that are vomiting, you can also try chicken and rice to help calm her stomach.
Prompt attention from a veterinarian should be sought if your dog vomits multiple times in one day or for more than one day in a row. In addition, you should seek veterinary attention if your dog shows the following symptoms accompanied by vomiting: Loss of appetite. Change in frequency of urination.
If your pet is lethargic, refusing food or having bloody vomit or diarrhea, you should take him or her to your veterinarian immediately. If your dog is vomiting or having diarrhea, you should skip his or her next meal. After this, you can start feeding the bland diet.
Intestinal parasites, such as roundworms. Viral infections, such as distemper, parvovirus and coronavirus. Diseases, such as kidney disease, cancer and stomach ulcers. Ingesting poisons like rat poison, antifreeze, pesticides or household drugs, like acetaminophen and aspirin.
If your dog has been vomiting frequently or it has become a long-term or chronic issue, this is cause for concern, especially if you`ve noticed symptoms including abdominal pain, depression, dehydration, blood, poor appetite, fever, weakness, weight loss or other unusual behaviors.
It could be that your dog ate more than they could handle or ate too fast, or your dog could have eaten too much grass. Sometimes the cause could be more serious. Your dog could have swallowed something toxic, or it may be a sign of a serious illness, which could require a visit to see your vet.
Causes of Chronic Vomiting

Common gastrointestinal causes include: inflammatory bowel disease, viral or bacterial infection, gastritis (typically caused by garbage ingestion or changing the diet too quickly), pancreatitis, foreign body and neoplasia. Systemic causes include toxicities and kidney and liver disease.

With proper treatment, your dog`s stomach virus should subside within three to seven days. If symptoms last longer than two weeks, call or visit your veterinarian. To learn more about the symptoms your pet may be experiencing and get advice from our in-house vet, review Gastroenteritis in Dogs.
Most cases of gastroenteritis can be cured within a few days, but it is essential to keep an eye on your dog`s progress throughout this time. If your dog doesn`t appear to improve or gets worse, you should contact your vet immediately.
Ginger is one of the best home remedies for your dog`s vomiting and upset stomach. You can make ginger tea by boiling fresh ginger root in water, cooling it, and giving it to your dog in small amounts throughout the day.
Some of the signs of parvovirus include lethargy; loss of appetite; abdominal pain and bloating; fever or low body temperature (hypothermia); vomiting; and severe, often bloody, diarrhea. Persistent vomiting and diarrhea can cause rapid dehydration, and damage to the intestines and immune system can cause septic shock.
The most common reasons your dog may not be comfortable while lying down are joint pain, anxiety, dementia, pancreatitis, bloat and heart disease.
Allow them to rest. Don`t force your dog to play or walk if they don`t seem interested. Their body will need to naturally recover after vomiting, which is generally over a period of 1-2 days.
Small dogs are considered senior citizens of the canine community when they reach 11-12 years of age. Their medium-sized friends become seniors at 10 years of age. Their larger-sized colleagues are seniors at 8 years of age. And, finally, their giant-breed counterparts are seniors at 7 years old.
Acute pancreatitis can occur after a dog eats a fatty food such as pork, beef, and some other human foods. Dogs that get into garbage can develop pancreatitis. Pancreatitis can also have other causes, including certain medications and some viral or bacterial infections.
There is a higher prevalence of pancreatitis in Miniature Schnauzers, Yorkshire Terriers, Cocker Spaniels, Dachshunds, Poodles, sled dogs, or other breeds. Some infections, such as Babesia canis or Leishmania, may also contribute to the development of pancreatitis.
Most dogs with a GI obstruction have severe abdominal pain as well as a lack of appetite. A classic sign of pain is the bowing down position. Your dog may not want to be touched on the tummy. Or she may groan and be tense and wide eyed when you touch her there.
Early Symptoms of Intestinal Blockage in Dogs

Some dogs may be immediately put off by food with others just not eating as much. Some of that food may make its way through, or a dog may always vomit a meal back up, even a couple of hours later.

Partial obstruction allows the dog to pass some stool and gas, but this constriction will eventually damage the intestines if not remedied. A complete GI obstruction is an emergency that can swiftly lead to death if untreated.
Take away her food bowl and remove her water bowl, as well—guzzling too much H20 can irritate your pup`s GI tract even further. Instead, offer a few laps or ice cubes every few hours, suggests Elswick. “Gently rubbing his or her abdomen when your dog has an “upset tummy” may provide some comfort,” says Elswick.
It is important to give your dog`s digestive system some time to recoup and rest from the vomiting by not feeding your dog for 12-24 hours. You can give your dog small amounts of water to keep them hydrated. Food and large amounts of water will only aggravate your dog`s upset stomach.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Our 9 yr old cockapoo has been vomiting all nite and day now along with diariea. Drags herself around rather than walk. Keeping her hydrated.
ANSWER : A. If she has been vomiting that much it is impossible to keep her hydrated at home as she will be losing a lot more fluids and electrolytes than you can replace. You need to see your vet or emergency vet as soon as possible.

Read Full Q/A … : John Grogan

Q. How can I keep my 14 year old Yorkie from snapping at the younger ones?
ANSWER : A. It’s all about management. Do not allow the 7yo’s to interact with your 14yo unsupervised. You should be there each time they interact so you can redirect the 14yo’s attention onto some toys, or onto some treats when the 7yo’s are around. It sounds like you need to help your 14yo make positive associations with being around the younger pups. You should be trying to feed him treats each time he interacts with them, and doesn’t snap at them. Pet and praise him each time he is around them, or any time they are near. As I said, keep the separated when you cannot supervise their interactions because if you aren’t around when he is snapping at them, you could end up with a fight on your hands.

It could also be that they spend too much time together. Imagine spending 100% of your time with somebody, day in and out, doing everything together… including going to the bathroom.. that might bother anybody. I think you should give them more time apart from each other. Take them all on separate walks, separate them to play with them individually, separate them when you take them to potty, separate feeding times in separate rooms, etc. This can help alleviate the stress your older dog is feeling due to living closely with other dogs. You should always be giving individual activities in a houseful of dogs anyway.. when you expect them to get along 100% of the time, that’s when you find trouble.

Q. My puppy is throwing up her food this morning and yellow foamy stuff. Please help!
ANSWER : A. If the vomiting has only occurred once, it may be due to the fact that there was something causing a minor upset stomach in your pup. Yellow foam is often acid, and tummies that are upset or that have been empty for too long can cause this to appear in vomit. It may just be that your puppy needs an extra meal in the day to help keep her stomach happy. Eating a meal too quickly can also cause a pup to vomit up undigested food and foam, and feeding smaller meals more often, or slowing down your dog’s eating can help.

If the vomiting has only happened once, pick up your puppy’s food for an hour or two and then offer a bland meal of plain boiled chicken and plain rice. These bland ingredients can help settle upset stomachs while being enticing “people food”. If the vomiting does not occur again, you can return to a normal feeding schedule.

However, if the vomiting continues, worsens, or new symptoms appear along with it, then it is a good idea to schedule an appointment with your vet to rule out any more serious causes.

Q. My 3 month old puppy has had diarrhea, liquid form. This is the second day. What should I do? I recently changed his food as well.
ANSWER : A. Is he vomiting or lethargic? Food should always be introduced slowly over 7-10 days as that can cause diarrhea, if there are any other symptoms then contact you vet. Try introducing 3/4 of old food with 1/4 of new food for a few days & then half & half for a few days followed by 3/4 of new food with 1/4 old food for a few days before completely changing onto new diet.

Q. Which common foods are poisonous to pets?
ANSWER : A. That’s a great question. As responsible pet owners we need to be aware of food items that can be harmful to our canine or feline companions. Here are some of the most common foods proven to cause illness in our animals at home:

Chocolate: A favorite and irresistible treat amongst most humans, chocolate is considered toxic to dogs. In very small amounts it is usually not a huge issue, but with larger volumes and with darker chocolates pet owners should be concerned. Chocolate contains methylxanthine theobromine, which is similar to caffeine. Chocolate ingestion can cause vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity, issues with normal heartbeats, seizures, and in some severe cases, death. It is best to keep your favorite chocolate treats in a good hiding spot and out of reach of your dog or cat.

Grapes and raisins: Dogs should not consume grapes and raisins because of the risk of acute kidney failure. Most dogs experiencing grape or raisin toxicity will begin to have vomiting and/or diarrhea within 6-12 hours of ingestion. Other abnormal clinical signs include lethargy, abdominal pain, dehydration, and tremors. Kidney failure develops within 24-72 hours of the initial ingestion. There are some dogs that do not experience these devastating side effects. It is best to contact your veterinarian or veterinary emergency facility if you believe your pet has ingested grapes or raisins.

Garlic and onions: We often forget that our meals contain these two popular ingredients and will allow our furry companions a few bites or licks. Onion and garlic both can cause a type of poisoning that results in damage to red blood cells, making them more likely to rupture. They can also cause stomach upset and mouth irritation. Look for pale gums, increased breathing or drooling or any vomiting or diarrhea.

Bread dough: Unbaked bread dough is considered poisonous to our pets. The bread dough, when ingested, expands in the stomach because of the warm and moist environment. This can lead to a bloated or even twisted stomach. In addition yeast is often added to our baking products to help get bread to rise, and when this yeast is fermented it produces both carbon dioxide and alcohol. The alcohol produced can be absorbed into the bloodstream and causes dangerous drops in blood sugar, blood pressure and body temperature. Common clinical signs include vomiting or retching, distension of the stomach, weakness and collapse.

Macadamia nuts: Ingestion of these nuts are not proven to be fatal in dogs but can cause them to experience uncomfortable clinical sings, including fever, joint stiffness, vomiting, tremors and difficulty walking, especially in their hind legs. Often your pet will start to feel better after about 48 hours, but supportive veterinary care (such as pain medication) may help ease their discomfort.

Xylitol: The most common ingredient used in sugar-free gum is xylitol, which is a non-caloric sweetener. It is also found in some oral rinses, toothpastes and vitamins. Xylitol and dogs do not mix – it can cause a dangerous drop in blood sugars levels. Dogs will often display signs of disorientation, black tarry stool, tremors and seizures. If severe enough some dogs have developed liver failure. Keep your gum away from your canine companion.

Avocados: Avocados are not actually poisonous to dogs or cats but as many veterinarians can tell you the avocado pits can cause a foreign body obstruction. Avocados contain persin, which is actually toxic to the majority of pet birds. The abnormal clinical signs associated with avocado ingestion in birds include, respiratory distress, inability to perch, liver and kidney failure and sudden death.

Go forth and enjoy your favorite foods, but keep in mind which foods you should avoid sharing with your furry family members. Whenever in doubt, contact your veterinarian for healthy and safe food suggestions.

Q. My 1 year old great Pyrenees will not walk on the leash she stops and jumps around on the leash and when I try to walk her she just sits down.
ANSWER : A. At one year, she is right in the middle of canine adolescence which is when new fears can show up. She needs positive reinforcement and luring to teach her leash walking is a good thing. You can take some special, tasty treats that she doesn’t get regularly for leash walking time only. Use these treats to lure her forward a little bit at a time. Don’t pull or force her or it will become a big, negative experience to only reinforce her discomfort. Keep it light, positive, and fun. You will likely only get a short distance the first few days, but within a few weeks you should be able to increase that and help her overcome her fear about it.

Q. My dog has been throwing up a clear liquid (a little slimey) but otherwise acts fine. Could something be wrong?
ANSWER : A. How long has he been doing this? Ongoing vomiting (>2 weeks) warrants a vet visit, but if it’s a one-off, or happens very infrequently then it could be due to something he ate disagreeing with him. Is he is bright, alert and happy in himself I would monitor him, start keeping a vomit journal (seriously) of when he vomits, how much, what the vomit was like, what he was doing before and any other notes. This will be really useful for your vet if it requires further investigatoon. You can also try bland food – boiled chicken and white rice – in small amounts on his vomit days to give his tummy a rest. Withhold for 8h after a vomit and reintroduce the bland diet in small, frequent meals.

Q. How many minutes or hours should I play with my 3 month old puppy per day?

How long should I walk him per day?

ANSWER : A. Play with him as much as you like but as soon as he goes off to sleep or goes to his quiet space then it is important to leave him alone until he comes back to play again. Walking depends upon his size and breed. If you can do 2-3 shorter walks a day that will be good, as he gets older you can do longer walks.